‘Zero-star’ Jericho restaurant to re-open

first_imgThe Lebanese Restaurant Al-Shami has now reopened following the temporary closure imposed on the business last week.Al-Shami, of Walton Crescent, Jericho, was shut down by Oxford City Council inspectors on 19th March following a routine inspection which found failures in food hygiene management and staff not properly trained in safe food handling practices.In response to the Council’s actions Mimo Mahfouz, owner of Al-Shami, spent over £25,000 refurbishing the restaurant kitchen and installing new fridges and freezers which will now keep raw and cooked meat separate. An additional area has also now been created specifically for the preparation of raw meat.The restaurant was issued with a Hygiene Emergency Prohibition Order on Tuesday 16th March after officers found what the council have called ‘widespread evidence of cross contamination between open raw meat and high-risk ready to eat foods including cooked chicken, yoghurt, cheese and salad’.The order, which was then upheld by Oxford Magistrates on Friday 19th March, dictated that the restaurant be closed indefinitely, until the Council’s Environmental Health Officers were satisfied that any risks to health had been removed.Richard Kuziara, Environmental Health Officer, commented at the time: ‘When dangerous conditions such as these are found we will always take the necessary action to protect the public.‘The premises will only be allowed to reopen when we are satisfied that they can produce food that is safe to eat.’The improvements have been met with praise. Kuziara commented that, having interviewed all Al-Shami kitchen staff, he was satisfied that employees were now well aware of hygiene issues.The restaurant’s food hygiene rating, which totalled zero stars according to last week’s inspection, cannot officially change until another random routine inspection is performed. However, Mr Kuziara commented that the establishment would have achieved a three star rating had the inspection been carried out this week, after Mahfouz had implemented improvements.Mahfouz reflected on the recent events: ‘I feel that I have learned a lot from this and I thank environmental health for opening my eyes to a lot of things.’He added, ‘everybody was shocked that we were closed, but we are concentrating on hygiene now at least 10 times more than before, we owe it to our customers that we are in top condition everywhere’.Despite its recent bad press, students seemed keen to revisit Al-Shami, which has featured in The Which? Good Food Guide for the past twenty years. Claire Jonstone, a student living near to Walton Crescent, commented, ‘If the Council is happy now that the restaurant is hygienic, then I would definitely go – the food there is good’.Another undergraduate from the Jericho area agreed ‘I’m sure Al-Shami will still be fairly popular among students.’Information regarding the cleanliness of Oxford’s various food businesses is available through the City Council’s ‘Scores on the Doors’ scheme, which publishes restaurant information and hygiene ratings.last_img read more

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GALLEMORE, NANCY E. (nee: Harris)

first_img85, a longtime Bayonne resident and dedicated Jehovah Witness, passed away on February 22, 2017. Nancy was born in Jeffersonville, GA and has resided in Bayonne since 1951. She was a former dietician and also worked as a window manufacturer for Ideal Windows in Bayonne. Wife of the late Marshall Gallemore. Mother of Veronica Register, Batunda Gallemore and his wife Jessica, and the late Andrew Gallemore and Marshall Gallemore, Jr. Grandmother of Anthony Ingraham and Emmanuel Register. Great-Grandmother of Andrew and Emma Ingraham. Sister of Anna Carruthers. Aunt of George Riggins. She is also survived by a host of nieces & nephews. Funeral arrangements by G. KEENEN O’BRIEN Funeral Home, 984 Avenue C.last_img read more

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Guidance: Organisation testing registration: record of users

first_imgThere’s a new version of the record-keeping (bulk upload) spreadsheet to use from 26 February 2021, above. Register your completed record-keeping (bulk upload) spreadsheet After the organisation-based registration portal is updated, you will not be able to use a previous version of the spreadsheet to register tests.You should download and fill in this spreadsheet now so that you’re prepared for this change. Do not try to register this spreadsheet before 26 February.You can register up to 100 tests on the spreadsheet. You’ll need to complete separate spreadsheets for staff and non-staff.The guidance provides information on completing and uploading the record-keeping spreadsheet.center_img Watch a video demonstration of return box trackingDemonstration of return box tracking.Watch a video demonstration of registering mulitple test kits on the portal.Demonstration of registering mulitple test kits on the portal.See guidance on getting tested.last_img read more

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Graphic warnings on cigarettes effective across demographic groups

first_imgQuitting smoking is a common New Year’s resolution for Americans each year, but research has repeatedly shown it is not an easy task. Some groups, such as racial/ethnic minorities, have an even harder time quitting. New research suggests hard-hitting graphic tobacco warnings may help smokers of diverse backgrounds who are struggling to quit. A new study by researchers at Legacy® and Harvard School of Public Health provides further evidence that bold pictorial cigarette warning labels that visually depict the health consequences of smoking — such as those required under the 2009 Family Smoking and Prevention Tobacco Control Act — play a life-saving role in highlighting the dangers of smoking and encouraging smokers to quit.The study is one of the first to examine the effectiveness of pictorial warning labels versus text-only labels across diverse racial/ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Although a growing body of research has shown that disadvantaged groups may differ in their ability to access, process and act on health information, little is known about communication inequalities when it comes to cigarette warning labels.The study authors note that text-only cigarette warnings have been repeatedly characterized as unlikely to be noticed or have an impact, and cite prior research indicating pictorial warning labels are more effective. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Naples captures state mock trial crown

first_imgNaples captures state mock trial crown Naples captures state mock trial crown May 1, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img “Objection, your Honor!” These words rang through the Orange County Courthouse recently, but they were not the words of experienced trial attorneys; these were the words of high school students participating in the 2002 Florida High School Mock Trial Competition state finals.The Community School of Naples from Collier County won the first place Lady of Justice trophy and now will represent Florida at the National High School Mock Trial Championships in St. Paul, Minnesota, May 9-12. South Dade Senior High School finished second followed by Fletcher High School from Duval County, Pinellas Park High School, and Palm Bay High School from Brevard County.“This exercise in justice helps students learn to respect the rule of law and understand the processes in place in our democracy for resolving disputes,” said Annette Boyd Pitts, executive director of The Florida Law Related Education Association, which puts on the event. “The Mock Trial program teaches students about the legal system and the vital role our third branch of government has in our society. It instills trust and confidence in our courts.”Pitts said students who participate in the program not only gain a greater knowledge of the legal system, but they learn practical skills with lasting benefits.“Students learn how to think on their feet, make reasoned decisions, and gain important public speaking skills,” Pitts said.Did Metro City’s negligence cause the death of Sam Jones? Did Sam Jones cause his own death by knowingly drinking tap water contaminated with a parasite called Pindia? Are Sam Jones’ parents entitled to compensation for the death of their adult son? These were the legal issues examined by students arguing the fictional civil case Ricki Jones v. The City of Metro City, a civil case that asked whether the defendant was negligent and liable for the death of Sam Jones. Jones died of pindiatosis, in connection with AIDS, after drinking the city’s tap water which was infected with the parasite Pindia.Teams consisting of six to eight students studied the case for five months in preparation for the competition. Seventeen high schools and more than 170 students from across Florida participated in the program.More than 250 volunteers from Florida’s legal community donated approximately 1,000 service hours to the event, serving as judges and coaches in the mock trial circuit and state competitions. At the end of each round the judges gave critiques and advice to the students.last_img read more

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S.Korea warns of nationwide coronavirus spread as church outbreaks threaten capital

first_imgNearly 90% of the new cases appeared in the capital, Seoul, and surrounding areas, raising concern of the rapid spread of the virus in a metropolitan area of more than 25 million people.”We’re in a desperately dangerous crisis where infections are spreading in the Seoul metropolitan area and threatening to lead to a massive nationwide transmission,” Vice Health Minister Kim Gang-lip told a briefing.”The government cannot contain the current spread only with tracing and isolation … please stay home unless you must go out.”At least 140 of the new infections are linked to the Sarang Jeil Church, taking the number of cases from it to nearly 600. Topics : Authorities are trying to trace another 600 members of the church’s congregation who should be in isolation and would like to test all of its 4,000 members, Kim said.More than 8,500 police have been mobilized to track down church members, he said.Authorities have said some members of the church, which is run by a radical conservative preacher, are reluctant to come forward and get tested, or to self-isolate.Prime Minister Chung Sye-kyun said the government would take legal action against the church for any attempt to disrupt tracing and testing efforts by failing to provide accurate membership lists.At least three other smaller clusters have been linked to churches in Seoul and one to a church in the city of Yongin. Dozens of cases were linked to a coffee outlet in the city of Paju.Nightclubs, karaoke bars, buffets and cyber cafes have been ordered to close in Seoul and surrounding regions.In-person church services, have also been banned while indoor and outdoor gatherings have been restricted to no more than 50 and 100 people, respectively.Authorities said if the number of infections rises or continues at the current rate of spread, they will likely impose the highest level of social distancing rules, under which schools are closed, businesses advised to work from home and gatherings limited to 10 people.center_img South Korea reported on Wednesday its highest daily rise in novel coronavirus cases since early March as outbreaks from churches around the capital spread, prompting a warning of a nationwide wave of infections.The 297 new infections mark the sixth straight day of triple-digit increases in a country that has managed to blunt several previous outbreaks.The national tally rose to 16,058 infections with 306 deaths, according to data from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC).last_img read more

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Use antigen tests for screening but with caution: Experts

first_imgPCR tests can take hours or even days to process in labs as testing backlogs remain common in the country.”Certainly, antigen tests can be used in Indonesia as recommended by the WHO in order to replace rapid antibody tests, and screening with [antigen] tests can be more effective and won’t be a burden on PCR tests as the gold standard in diagnostic tests,” he said.Antigen tests use nasal or throat swab samples to detect certain proteins on the surface of the coronavirus. These tests do not require advanced lab equipment and come in the form of paper strips resembling home pregnancy tests.Antibody tests detect antibodies in blood samples – which may only develop weeks after infection and can form differently in people with certain conditions. Amid persistent COVID-19 testing constraints, the government appears to be looking into using rapid antigen tests, which are cheaper and faster although less accurate than the gold-standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. Experts are on board but urge caution.National COVID-19 task force spokesperson Wiku Adisasmito said the government was searching for better and more accurate alternatives to its current screening method of rapid antibody tests, whose inaccuracy experts have highlighted, and that it was considering antigen tests.Wiku said on Tuesday that the government was aware of the World Health Organization’s recommended list of rapid antigen test kits, which could provide results in less than 30 minutes. PCR tests detect the virus’ RNA, making them more accurate than the other two tests, but they require specific laboratory safety measures, skilled workers and specific machines.An insufficient number and uneven distribution of facilities that meet these requirements have been cited as reasons behind Indonesia’s low testing rates compared to other countries. Long testing turnaround remains a problem, affecting containment efforts that require people to be tested, traced and isolated quickly.Read also: COVID-19 leaves lab workers grappling with unprecedented testing scalePCR tests that are not subsidized by the government can cost more than Rp 2.5 million (US$168) – prohibitively expensive for many Indonesians. Some 120 million antigen tests costing $5 each will be made available to poorer nations, the WHO announced on Monday.The WHO said earlier that the use of rapid antigen tests could be considered in areas experiencing widespread community transmission, where it might not be possible to administer PCR tests or where test results faced long delays.But experts have said that further confirmation by PCR tests is necessary, especially if someone tests negative but shows symptoms indicative of COVID-19.Studies of antigen test kits of various brands cited by the WHO have shown that their sensitivity ranges between 0 and 94 percent, meaning the chance of false negatives could be high. But their specificity is consistently above 97 percent, meaning the chance of false positives is low.“I agree [about the use of antigen tests] for early phases, during which the viral load is believed to be at the highest level,” said Aryati, a professor of clinical pathology at Airlangga University who also chairs Indonesia’s Clinical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Specialists (PDS PatKLIn) association. “It can be performed both on people with symptoms or without.”Unlike PCR tests, which can detect even fragments of the virus, causing some people to test positive for months after symptoms disappear, antigen tests are believed to best detect the virus in patients with high viral loads. This means up to three days before symptom onset and within the first five to seven days of illness, according to existing, though limited, studies cited by the WHO.Read also: Carry out proper mass testing with PCR, experts sayBut since studies of the virus’ infectiousness over time are limited and require a more sophisticated viral culture, rather than simply relying on predicted viral loads, University of Indonesia microbiologist Anis Karuniawati said it was important to cautiously determine which populations were suitable for antigen tests. She said health authorities should consider what steps would be taken after results came back.”Whether we want it or not, we need a method that allows us to detect [possible cases] even more widely,” Anis said.She said these tests could be used not only where testing was scarce but where quick results were necessary, such as for triage purposes at hospitals. These tests could be performed outside labs, although the transmission risk during the processing of the tests had to be studied first, she said, adding that tests should be performed and interpreted by experts.The PDS PatKLIn has suggested that trained workers with personal protective equipment (PPE) perform the tests and that the samples only be processed at labs with level 2 biological safety cabinets and sufficient cold chain and infectious waste bins.It was important to purchase the tests advised by the WHO, experts said, and those that were not on the list should be validated by Health Ministry labs or other labs planning to use them to ensure their quality – unlike what occurred with the existing and widespread rapid antibody test kits.The WHO has recommended a minimum threshold of 80 percent sensitivity and 97 percent specificity for antigen test kits.”Don’t use just any [brand of test]. Use what’s recommended by the WHO […] There must be quality control and assurance. Don’t jump into using them without the knowledge of clinical pathologists,” said Herawati Supolo Sudoyo from the Eijkman Institute of Molecular Biology.Topics :last_img read more

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Man City boss Pep Guardiola reveals how he responded to Liverpool’s late win over Tottenham

first_imgPep Guardiola did not sugarcoat his feelings (Picture: Getty Images)Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola has admitted that he didn’t quite keep his cool when Liverpool secured a late win over Tottenham on Sunday.The Reds went back to the top of the Premier League with their victory over Spurs, which came thanks to a 90th minute own-goal from Toby Alderweireld.City can leapfrog Liverpool again on Wednesday night if they can pick up three points at home to Cardiff in a title race which Guardiola admitted was never going to be easy.However, he hoped it was going to be made a bit easier by Spurs picking up a draw at Anfield.ADVERTISEMENT Phil HaighTuesday 2 Apr 2019 2:40 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link77Shares Comment Toby Alderweireld’s late own goal gave Liverpool three points on Sunday (Picture: Getty Images)When asked about his reaction to Liverpool’s win, Guardiola said: ‘When you see them you think “ah s**t” but no one said it would be easy.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘We knew it, I knew it. It is a better challenge. It is an incredible team to fight against them.‘Yesterday I saw how Arsenal play, incredible manager Unai [Emery] and incredible distance.‘Everybody is excited for the next few weeks. It is not so complicated. It is amazing to live this opportunity.’ Guardiola is relishing the challenge (Picture: Getty Images)Pep also confirmed that Sergio Aguero will miss the clash with Cardiff on Wednesday night after picking up an injury against Fulham on Saturday.The problem is not thought to be a serious one, but it is enough to leave their top scorer out of the meeting with the Bluebirds.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityIf, as expected, City beat Cardiff at the Etihad then they will go one point clear of Liverpool at the top, and take them back to level on games played (32).‘Everyone is excited about the next weeks, but we also know we can lose everything,’ continued the Spaniard. ‘It’s amazing to have this opportunity, to be there.’MORE: Chelsea boss Maurizio Sarri confirms worrying Marcos Alonso injury newsMORE: Chelsea want Reece James to challenge Cesar Azpilicueta for first-team place next seasoncenter_img Man City boss Pep Guardiola reveals how he responded to Liverpool’s late win over Tottenham Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

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Schools scramble to check rules after student’s legal victory

first_imgNZ Herald 28 June 2014New Zealand schools are facing hefty legal bills to ensure their rules on students’ appearance are legally watertight following a High Court ruling that a college’s decree on hair length was not legally enforceable.Lucan Battison, 16, successfully challenged his suspension from St John’s College in Hastings for refusing to cut his “naturally curly hair”.The school’s rules state students must have “hair that is short, tidy and of natural colour. Hair must be off the collar and out of the eyes.”Yesterday, Justice David Collins said the rule was capable of being interpreted differently by students, parents, teachers, the principal and the board of trustees and was not legally enforceable.He also ruled that Lucan’s refusal to follow principal Paul Melloy’s directive to get his hair cut did not amount to setting a harmful or dangerous example to other students.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11283431last_img read more

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PM’s legal team questions IPO’s decision to investigate alleged interest in villas

first_img 21 Views   no discussions Share Share Senior Council, Anthony Astaphan.Senior Council Anthony Astaphan and his team are seeking further clarification from the Integrity in Public Office Commission about its decision to probe Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit’s alleged involvement in the villa.Astaphan says there appears to be inconsistency in several sections of the ruling and the findings of the IPO Commission.Click here to listen to Senior Counsel Astaphan:  Mr. Astaphan says his team has serious difficulties with the evidence which was relied upon; evidence which was submitted by the complainant Mr. Lennox Linton and regarding the reasoning and rationale of the Integrity Commission.Dominica Vibes News Sharecenter_img Sharing is caring! Tweet LocalNews PM’s legal team questions IPO’s decision to investigate alleged interest in villas by: – July 21, 2011last_img read more

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