New faculty deans appointed

first_imgDanoff Dean of Harvard College Rakesh Khurana announced today the appointment of the new faculty deans of Currier House. Professor Latanya Sweeney and Sylvia Barrett will take their posts this fall.“I’m tremendously pleased that these two very talented and strong members of the Harvard community will assume these important roles,” Khurana said. “Both Latanya and Sylvia have demonstrated a strong commitment to teaching, learning, and community-building in their careers, and will be a wonderful addition to Harvard College’s residential community as the faculty leaders of Currier House.”Sweeney is professor of government and technology in residence and director and founder of the Data Privacy Lab at Harvard. She is editor in chief of the journal Technology Science, former chief technology officer at the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, and distinguished career professor of computer science, technology, and policy at Carnegie Mellon University. In 2001, Sweeney became the first African-American woman to earn her Ph.D. in computer science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).Her undergraduate program began at MIT, and after 10 years away to run a business, she returned to graduate with a degree in computer science from Harvard Extension School in 1995, at which time she gave a motivating and often-cited graduation speech about those in academic despair.Barrett is a lawyer who has lived most of her adult life in Cambridge but grew up in New York and South Korea with her African-American father, Korean mother, and younger brother. She first came to Cambridge to attend MIT and immediately felt at home in the area’s diverse communities. During her junior year, she got the entrepreneurial bug, like many of her peers at the time, and left MIT to start a computer company with Sweeney.After almost 10 years in the business arena, Barrett returned to school and graduated from Harvard Extension School (A.L.B. ’95) and the University of Pittsburgh School of Law (J.D. ’02). For a brief time, she worked in the Science Center, designing and facilitating technology options for the Extension School and Harvard Summer School courses. In law school, Barrett was editor in chief of the Pittsburgh Journal of Technology Law and Policy, won the National Association of Women Lawyer’s Student Achievement Award, and received the School of Law Community Service Award. After graduation, Barrett engaged in private practice, specializing in business law.The two met as MIT undergraduates and have been together for 30 years. Their son, Leonard, is 8 years old and into everything. His current passions are “Magic the Gathering” trading cards, chess, reading, and biking.Interim Dean of Student Life Tom Dingman, who assisted in the search, said of the new deans, “The students, tutors, and staff on the in-house advisory committee who met Latanya and Sylvia were impressed greatly by their warmth, varied experience, and high energy and interest.”last_img read more

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With Overseers president, interacting is key

first_imgAfter six years on Harvard’s Board of Overseers, President Kenji Yoshino ’91 steps down this year. Yoshino, a Rhodes Scholar and the Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Constitutional Law at New York University Law School, sat down with the Gazette recently and looked back as well as ahead, reflecting on everything from the board’s work to his years as a College student.  GAZETTE: Your term on the Board of Overseers and as board president is ending in a few months. Any advice for your successor?YOSHINO: I have an inkling of who that successor might be. And I have no advice for that individual because that individual is spectacular and will do a terrific job.I will say, however, that when I assumed the role of president of the board last year, the most helpful thing I did was to engage in a listening tour of my Overseer colleagues. I took suggestions for the kinds of plenary sessions that we would have this year, meaning that our agenda arose out of consensus.Our first meeting in the fall was about The Harvard Campaign and how we can make the most of its final two years. The second was about inclusion and belonging, which provided us with an opportunity to engage with the leaders of President [Drew] Faust’s task force. The third was about the mentorship of tenure-track faculty. We have sessions coming up on Allston and on digital learning.One procedural change, which also arose out of that listening tour, has been a constant. We’ve tried to create more of a conversation with the individuals who generously come to present at our plenaries, whether it’s a group of faculty members or a dean or members of task forces. We’ve been saying to all of our presenters: “Let’s just try an experiment in living for a year, in that we’re going to be much more interactive. When you come in here, we want you to talk at the outset for just a tiny amount of time. Because what we really want to do is invite you into a conversation. We come from all different walks of life, and hopefully you’ll be able to get the equivalent of 13 ways of looking at a blackbird.”GAZETTE: So the plenary sessions have become more a conversation than a presentation?YOSHINO: Exactly. And a continuing dialogue about what’s best for the University also occurs between the sessions. For each of our meetings this year, we’ve had some set of queries sent around before the meeting. For the mentorship meeting, for example, we sent around a questionnaire saying to Overseers: “Can you describe an experience of positive or noteworthy mentorship you had? What made it work? How might it translate to the context of mentoring tenure-track faculty here?”It got a conversation going, and leveraged the diversity of the board. Of the bodies that have leadership responsibility here, the Board of Overseers may well be the most diverse demographically and professionally. For that reason alone, we can add value as a focus group. The hope is to say: “What don’t we know? What could we understand better? How could we make this University better?”GAZETTE: What do you see as some of the biggest challenges facing Harvard in the years to come?YOSHINO: The biggest challenges are, frankly, endemic to all higher education. But because it is so visible, Harvard will create a cascade effect where it succeeds; conversely, if Harvard stumbles, the world will hear about it.When I think about those challenges, the first is the affordability of higher education that we’re all struggling with these days.Another one would be trying to think about an education in noninstrumental terms, which means defending the humanities and a liberal education in a world that seems to relentlessly emphasize education in increasingly vocational terms.And a third would be how to deal with demographics that are different in kind from anything we’ve experienced before. We’re going to be a nation in 2050 where no ethnicity, for example, is going to be a majority. That’s a place that we’ve never been before as a country. So fortifying ourselves so we’re an institution in which students from diverse backgrounds can not only be admitted to the University but can also all thrive here, I think that’s going to be a major challenge. GAZETTE: How would you describe the responsibilities of the board?YOSHINO: The Board of Overseers has 30 members elected by the alumni. There are some matters we formally decide. But for the most part, we give the University the best advice and counsel we can with regard to its long-term objectives, ideals, and strategies.As a practical matter, we have these plenary sessions that bring together all of us, and then six different standing committees that meet on the mornings before the plenary. Three of those committees focus on the humanities and arts, the social sciences, and the natural and applied sciences. The other three have to do with the Schools, with finance, administration, and management, and with institutional policy.We have other committees, together with the Corporation, on honorary degrees, on audit, on alumni affairs and development. And we offer advice through all of those channels.And then there are our visiting committees, on which we sit and which report in to us. I was correctly told when I came on the Overseers that “visitation” would be one of the most significant parts of our remit, because a visiting committee is a committee that engages intensely with a department or School. These committees exert significant influence in affirming or redirecting the trajectory of a department or School.GAZETTE: Which visiting committees have you sat on, and how did those specific experiences go?YOSHINO: The College, the English Department, the Law School, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study — all were fantastic experiences.Just to take an example from the College. I remember the visit right when Dean [Rakesh] Khurana was coming in to his first round of meetings. He was inspiring about what Harvard is doing and how it’s trying to help its students become good citizens and leaders. The second-best part of the visit was his query: “If we were Harvard, what would we do?” The best part of the visit, as is often the case, was meeting the students.GAZETTE: What made you accept the invitation to run for Overseer?YOSHINO: It was really President Faust, in candor, and also love of Harvard. Harvard changed not just not my own life, but my family’s life.My father was a professor at Harvard Business School, so I grew up in Belmont and then in Cambridge. I grew up as a “fac brat.” I went to boarding school, then “came home” for college, given that Mather House was a stone’s throw away from where my parents lived.I did a couple of years at Oxford, and I went to Yale Law School and taught there for a number of years. But I’d always felt a deep tie to Harvard for what it’s done for my family, and what it did for me when I was an undergraduate here.It was a completely transformative experience where I really felt I learned — it’s a little mortifying to put it this way — but I learned how to read and write at Harvard as an English major. And I wrote a collection of poems for my senior thesis. I worked with Seamus Heaney and Helen Vendler, and it was just a kind of peerless educational experience. I still, even as a law professor, teach my constitutional law classes as classes on interpretation.And when President Faust called me six years ago, I thought, “Well, here is a completely inspirational individual.” She told me about the Board of Overseers and her vision of the University: One Harvard, interdisciplinary studies, increasing access to the University, a profound commitment to the humanities at a time when the humanities were beleaguered (as they still are). I felt this would be the perfect way to close the circle and return to Harvard.GAZETTE: How has your view of Harvard changed through your experience as an Overseer, compared with what it was when you were a student?YOSHINO: Seismically. As a student, of necessity, you’re only getting one cut of the University. As an Overseer, you’re seeing across the whole.I have a better understanding of Harvard as a university than I do of Yale as a university or NYU as a university, even though I’ve been a professor in the law schools there. Being on the board gives us such a privileged perspective.I have described it as being like the red dot or storm that moves over Jupiter. You’re constantly roving over the surface, so you get to understand this vast University much better than you could from any other vantage point.I knew the College as an undergrad and the Business School because my dad taught there. But that was about it.Now, as an Overseer, I’ve seen so many different parts of the University, including ones that I’d never set foot in as a student, like the School of Design, the Radcliffe Institute, which didn’t exist as such then, the Divinity School, the Kennedy School, the School of Public Health. The i-lab obviously wasn’t here when I was here, and that’s a really extraordinary space to visit. So it’s a privileged perspective.We’re sitting here in Loeb House, and Lamont Library right outside still looks exactly the same as it did when I was working late nights there as a student. The Henry Moore sculpture is still out there, right by Lamont. I wrote a fine arts paper on it to satisfy a core requirement. Houghton Library, which you can also see through the curtains there, is where Helen Vendler took us to see the correspondence between Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell, which for me as an English major was extraordinary, and also the papers of Sylvia Plath. I took a seminar in Plath, Lowell, and Bishop with her, which, again, was a game-changer for me. It’s just amazing to see the kind of schoolgirlish handwriting Sylvia Plath had. She might have been dotting her i’s with hearts, but the things she was writing were, of course, of a different tenor — the contrast is still extraordinary.It’s wonderful to think that some things have remained exactly the same. But at the same time there’s immense transformation. Not even leaving the world of architecture, look at the Harvard Art Museums’ renovation, which we can see through the other window. It’s an extraordinary transformation of that space. I try to sneak in there from time to time when I’m here because it’s literally across the street. It’s just been revitalized.President Faust once said, “Harvard endures because Harvard changes.” And Harvard also endures because what’s incomparable about this University is preserved. I hope that we as Overseers play some small part in thinking about how best to craft that story of change and continuity.last_img read more

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A pioneering mind for the power of design

first_imgAs a sophomore at Wellesley College, Adele Fleet Bacow was attracted to architecture and art. Soon, after enrolling in a course on urban sociology, she found a passion that combined her love for the arts with her desire to help enhance the vitality of neighborhoods and communities.The only problem was that Bacow had to develop her own major, since the path she envisioned didn’t exist at her college. Fortunately, a cross-registration program had recently been established between Wellesley and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Creating a major in urban design, she was able to draw greedily from classes in the schools of architecture and urban planning at MIT.The experience was not exactly new. Growing up as the fourth of five siblings in a close-knit family in Jacksonville, Fla., she was used to charting her own course.“It was wonderful to be part of a large family,” said Bacow in an interview at Loeb House. “There is never someone doing things for you, for the most part. You learn to be fairly independent and forge your own way.”Now, Bacow is looking forward to leaving her imprint at Harvard.On a recent Monday morning, Bacow spoke with parents, helped carry boxes, and posed for photos as she and her husband, Harvard President Larry Bacow, welcomed first-years to campus. It was, in many ways, a continuation of the warm and personable style the Bacows demonstrated as first couple at Tufts, where they hosted senior dinners, served pancakes to students during reading period, and once performed a hip-hop dance with faculty that nearly brought down the house. In her new role, Bacow plans to stay connected to student life, but with limits.“We have a lot of energy, but I’m not promising hip-hop,” she said, breaking into laughter.A Wellesley College graduate with a master’s degree in city planning from MIT, Bacow feels fortunate to have built a career that combined her interests in community development and the arts, while also helping to raise two sons and supporting her husband’s pursuits as a scholar and higher ed leader.At the helm of Community Partners Consultants, a firm she founded in 1996, Bacow’s work focused on urban planning, cultural economic development, and the arts. Throughout her career as a city planner and urban designer, Bacow has worked with cities and towns, state agencies, and community-based organizations focusing on economic and community development, design, and the arts. Her work in the public and private sectors led her to advocate for better public environments and to promote design that highlighted the revitalization of downtowns, urban spaces, and public facilities. Much of her work drew upon the symbiosis of arts and community development.Design, said Bacow, is neither a “frill” nor merely “aesthetics.” It affects the lives of communities because it is closely tied to economic development. In 1995, she published “Designing the City: A Guide for Advocates and Public Officials” as a manual to inform efforts to improve “the way communities are planned, designed, and built.”“People used to say, ‘Why should I worry about design when there are more important things, such as schools and education?’” noted Bacow. “When I wrote the book, many mayors said they wanted their cities to have a better design because it benefits their communities. It improves their living environment, which attracts workers, businesses, and increases property values and tax revenues.”Bacow’s influence on urban design has left a mark, said Gary Hack, professor emeritus of urban planning at MIT, where he led the Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Bacow and Hack met at the school while she was taking a course in urban design and architecture.“Adele was a pioneer in the field,” said Hack. “Back then, people thought economic development involved making industrial parks to attract companies to locate their offices or production factories. Not many people thought about the quality of design as an important tool to attract businesses to their communities. She made a career out of the intersection of design and economic development.”As director of design and development at the Massachusetts Council on the Arts and Humanities, Bacow created a statewide program to advance the quality of design and planning. For her work with the council, she was awarded a Federal Design Achievement Award from the Presidential Design Awards program. She also served as deputy director of the Massachusetts Government Land Bank, responsible for the redevelopment of blighted properties and former military bases.Anne Hawley, who as executive director of the Council on the Arts and Humanities hired Bacow, recalled the role Bacow played in helping government officials advance design in the public interest. Bacow worked with main streets and small towns that were struggling with runaway development. She also organized bridge design workshops for engineers at the Department of Public Works and brought in Swiss bridge designer Christian Menn to chair a bridge design competition. Menn would play an influential role in the design concept for the cable-stayed Zakim Bridge over the Charles River.“Adele made people in government understand that design was an important part of everyday life,” said Hawley, who went on to direct the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum from 1989 to 2015.“The Zakim Bridge was a result of her work. She helped us understand that design could improve public places and public life. From rural Massachusetts to the bridges, she figured out a way to involve architectural designers in enhancing theenvironment.”To connect government officials to the ways design impacted their communities, Bacow commissioned Anne Mackin and Alex Krieger to write “A Design Primer for Cities and Towns,” which was distributed to planning, conservation, and historic preservation boards across the state.“At that time, when the primer was published [in 1989], there was a growing concern about sprawling America and how it was becoming more suburban-focused at the expense of the quality of our towns and villages,” said Krieger, a professor in practice of urban design at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.“Adele was determined, among others, to reinstigate a discussion about what makes good communities. She has been a great advocate for urban design and preservation and continuation of quality of life in our cities, small towns, and villages.”Over the past two decades, as cities and downtown centers suffered blight and decay, Bacow began promoting the arts as a tool to spur economic and community development.“I thought it was a bit schizophrenic at first, in integrating the fields of the arts and economic development, but now you see it recognized everywhere,” Bacow said. “People have realized the value of the arts in community and economic development.”Some of Bacow’s favorite projects include strategic plans for Artists for Humanity’s EpiCenter in Boston, business plans for community development corporations working to create jobs for low-income people nationwide, a master plan and economic development strategy for the Worcester Arts District, and a plan for an arts and cultural district for downtown Beverly, Mass.For Bacow, who grew up in a family that loved art, music, and culture, the role of arts is paramount to quality of life. Her father, a pediatrician, and her mother, a trained pianist and an active volunteer, would take their five children to local cultural events.“I have art in my soul,” said Bacow, who plans to bring a baby grand piano to Elmwood, the Harvard president’s house.Asked what she would have been had she not become an urban planner, Bacow said that she contemplated becoming a journalist or a high school art teacher, and that earlier in life she entertained the “fantasy” of being a ballet dancer. But becoming an urban planner was a perfect marriage of her love for the arts and her desire to help improve communities. It was a desire born in her teenage years when her work as a Head Start volunteer in Jacksonville took her across the railroad tracks on her bike and opened her eyes to segregation in her home city.“I didn’t realize how important that experience was,” Bacow said. “But in college, while taking an urban sociology class, I went back to those memories and I became interested in issues such as inner cities, community, and economic development.”As for her life at Harvard, Bacow said she relishes being surrounded by young learners and expects to maintain a healthy balance between her diverse interests and family life, which now includes Harvard students.“I spent my whole adult life around college students,” Bacow said. “I think it’s the best age in the world. College students are so full of life and promise, optimism, and idealism. There is nothing better.”last_img read more

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Beer Blog: Old Chub Nitro…The Shaft of Beers

first_imgHere’s the beautiful thing about craft beer: Brewers are never satisfied with “good” or even “great.” They’re always finding new ways to take their beers to “11.” Bourbon barrel aging, dry hopping, blending batches, resting porters on cocoa nibs…They’re always looking for ways to make good beer better.Take Oskar Blues’ Old Chub. It’s an excellent beer. Absolutely nothing wrong with it. A perfect example of a Scotch ale—malty, biscuity, and chocolatey without being too decadent. It’s a hell of a beer.But that wasn’t good enough for Oskar Blues, so this year, they introduced cans of Old Chub juiced with nitrogen.Nitrogen is basically a different way of adding carbonation to the beer, typically malt forward beers like stouts or porters. The addition of nitrogen adds a creamy element to the beer. Guinness is the most famous example of a beer that’s gassed with nitrogen.Oskar Blues put a nitrogen widget in each 16-ounce can of their Scotch Ale. Pop the top and the gas is released into the beer. That’s an over simplification of the process, but I’m an overly simple guy.This new, nitrogen Old Chub, is better than the traditional Old Chub. It goes to 11. Pour the beer into a glass and the bubbles do this crazy wave dance thing as they make their way up the side of the glass. The beer has a thick head that looks like you could tap dance on, but it’s actually as soft as cotton candy. The drink itself is as smooth as Billy D. Williams.It’s stupid creamy. I’d like to see more beers get the nitro treatment. I’m sure it’s expensive as hell, but the result is addictive. It’s like taking your typical stout or porter, and filtering it through the Shaft soundtrack. You know what I’m saying? Smooth, people. Smooth…last_img read more

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Public weighs in on pandemic vaccine allocation plan

first_imgDec 12, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – As US officials wrap up efforts to gauge the public’s response to a draft plan for allocating vaccine supplies during an influenza pandemic, suggestions to fine-tune the plan are emerging, such as giving higher priority to critical infrastructure workers, the families of key healthcare workers, and community pharmacists.A 3-day Web dialogue, held Dec 4 through 6, drew about 420 people who either participated in or observed guided discussions on various aspects of the pandemic vaccine prioritization draft, according to summaries of the dialogue posted on the event Web site. The event was sponsored by the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), along with the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) and National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO).The groups, with assistance from the Keystone Center, a nonprofit science public policy group based in Keystone, Colo., will hold a stakeholder meeting in Washington, DC, tomorrow. They also sponsored a series of public engagement meetings in January in Las Cruces, N.M., and Nassau County, N.Y., and in November in Milwaukee and Henderson County, N.C. HHS is taking comments on the draft pandemic vaccine allocation plan through Dec 31, according to a Federal Register notice.A federal interagency working group presented its vaccine prioritization draft to HHS’s National Vaccine Advisory Committee on Oct 23. The tiered approach lists key health and safety personnel and children as top priorities.During the Web dialogue, participants offered several ideas for revising the draft guidance, according to daily summaries on the dialogue Web site. Some suggested that adding an age criterion to the occupation groups might help the plan fulfill its goals of reducing deaths and maintaining critical infrastructure. “It was noted that the draft guidance is not age-based, but leans more toward protecting society (critical infrastructure) and the population groups at the top [of the priority lists],” the summary notes.One of the main themes, according to the daily summaries, was protecting critical infrastructure, especially the electric power grid. Employees who maintain electrical systems should be moved to the top tier, many of the participants said.”Some suggested that the only true critical infrastructure is electric power,” the dialogue summary said. Employees who maintain power systems “should receive the highest priority for prophylactic antiviral medications, have special support for their families, and be first in line for vaccine,” the summary noted.The vaccination priority of family members was also raised several other times during the Web dialogue. Though many participants seemed to support family coverage for first responders and other key healthcare workers, there was less of a consensus on priority status for the families of military members and homeland security employees. Some surveys have indicated that many healthcare workers will not show up for work during a pandemic if their families don’t receive antiviral medication or vaccines and if they don’t have adequate personal protective equipment.Some participants said the final vaccine priority plan should factor in important supply chain issues and protect workers who produce and deliver necessities such as raw materials, medicine, food, and fuel.The discussion moderators asked participants what the government should do to make the vaccine priority plan more acceptable to the public. Suggestions included keeping citizens informed when supplies of vaccines and antiviral medications change. “Citizens will be enraged if their expectation is not adjusted before a pandemic starts. Set the policy for the current reality and be up-front about the implications,” the summary said.Though the discussion summaries don’t suggest that participants supported moving many groups down on the priority list, a poll at the end of the dialogue asked participants to make some difficult choices. The dialogue summary said the poll questions were crafted from questions and concerns from the dialogue and public engagement sessions. About 170 people took part in the poll, which also included some who attended public engagement sessions in Henderson County, N.C., and Milwaukee. The poll results are available on the dialogue Web site.For example, when participants were asked if people aged 80 or older should be moved from tier 4 to tier 5, 76% (129) agreed to some extent. And when they were asked if school-age children should be moved up and vaccinated before infants and younger children, 79% (135) agreed.Terry Adirim, MD, MPH, a member of the federal interagency work group that produced the draft vaccine plan, served as a panelist during all of the Web dialogue. Adirim is medical adviser for medical readiness in the Office of Health Affairs in the US Department of Homeland Security. She also helped facilitate some of the public engagement forums.Adirim said the dialogue and public engagement sessions were designed both to solicit public comments and to educate the public about pandemic readiness issues, and the facilitators were impressed with how much many of the attendees already knew about the topics. “We consider it a success,” she said, adding that participants made it clear they had concerns about personal preparedness and government transparency about pandemic and vaccine-related issues.”People also wanted children protected, and moderators familiar with the vaccine plan were able to address why they [the interagency working group] did what they did,” Adirim said.Nicholas Kelley, a masters’ degree candidate in environmental public health at the University of Minnesota, took part in the dialogue during all 3 days. “I’m 24, so I’m in an age-group that would be at high risk, and these issues are fascinating to me,” he said. Kelley is also a research assistant for the CIDRAP Business Source and has worked on college pandemic plans.He said many of the participants were uncertain about how the case-fatality rate during a pandemic will actually steer vaccination strategies, especially since what’s known about the rates during a pandemic is based on historical data. “There’s a lot of disconnect,” Kelley said.”People really want to keep as many alive as possible, but no one really wanted to move people down [the priority list],” he said.Support for protecting critical infrastructure workers grew as the Web dialogue progressed, Kelley noted. “You could see a real shift by the third day. People were adamant about critical infrastructure,” he said.”In a public forum, there are always possibilities for heated emotional exchanges, but the Web format included well-articulated and thought-out comments,” Kelley said of the Web dialogue.In a previous report, the federal interagency working group said that after receiving public comments it would revise the vaccine prioritization plan, which will be considered a final interim report.See also:Draft Guidance on Allocating and Targeting Pandemic Influenza Vaccinehttp://www.flu.gov/individualfamily/vaccination/allocationguidance.pdfOct 24 CIDRAP News story “Pandemic vaccine proposal favors health workers, children”Federal Register notice on comment submissionPandemic vaccine prioritization Web dialogue sitePandemic vaccine allocation poll resultslast_img read more

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Pennsylvania Leaders Launch Public Safety Initiative to Tackle Drivers of Cost, Incarceration, and Recidivism

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter February 18, 2016 Criminal Justice Reform,  Government That Works,  Press Release,  Public Safety,  Results Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf and leaders from both political parties and all three branches of government today launched an extensive review of the state’s criminal justice system as part of a new Justice Reinvestment Initiative designed to reduce ineffective corrections spending and invest those savings in proven public safety strategies.“A broken criminal justice system is a failure to deliver on the promise of a fair and just society, and we must all work together to ensure Pennsylvania leads the nation in rehabilitation and not incarceration,” Governor Wolf said. “While much progress has been made, there is more we can do and today is the beginning of an important process to look at how we can improve our criminal justice system from sentencing guidelines to our bail system. Working together, we can make many significant changes that will make our system fairer, improve public safety and save millions of dollars.”Pennsylvania currently has the highest incarceration rate among all states in the Northeast, despite reducing its prison population in recent years. The Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice Center, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization assisting the state in its justice reinvestment approach, today released an overview of the state’s criminal justice system. Preliminary findings include:Pennsylvania is one of only four states in the nation where corrections spending exceeds expenditures on higher education;Between 2004 and 2014, corrections expenditures increased by 40 percent, from $1.5 billion to $2.2 billion.Over the same period, the state’s incarceration rate increased by 20 percent. Conversely, New York and New Jersey saw their incarceration rates drop by 20 percent and 21 percent, respectively.The Department of Corrections has requested $2.3 billion in state funds for the 2015–2016 budget, a 7-percent increase over the prior year.“When legislators from both sides of the aisle work together to tackle these tough issues, we create genuine results,” House Speaker Mike Turzai said. “We proved that with a justice reinvestment approach we took in 2012. That bipartisan spirit must be invoked again in order to build on the positive outcomes that we are seeing to create a safer and more cost effective system.”Indeed, the justice reinvestment approach has already proven to be effective in Pennsylvania. After the state’s prison population increased by 28 percent (from 40,090 to 51,184 people) between 2002 and 2012, a Justice Reinvestment Initiative conducted by the state in 2012 helped spur a decline in the population to 49,914 people by the end of 2015. These changes generated almost $13 million in savings, close to $4 million of which was reinvested in areas to enhance public safety, such as victims’ services, effective policing procedures, strengthening probation, and local reentry strategies.“Pennsylvania has certainly made significant headway over the last few years with strong improvements to our criminal justice system,” Senate President Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati said. “It is vital that we continue to work towards increasing efficiencies and reducing the costs of our corrections system. We need to reduce recidivism to benefit our communities and help ensure that taxpayer dollars that are being sent to Harrisburg are being used productively.”Despite the impacts from the 2012 reforms, other drivers of incarceration and costs at the state and local levels remain unaddressed. Therefore, the latest justice reinvestment effort will focus on the front end of the system, including sentencing and pretrial policies.“Our prisons were taking on increases of 1,500 inmates each year. In turn, our taxpayers were taking on enormous costs. The 2012 corrections and parole reforms halted a lot of that,” said John Wetzel, secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Corrections and board member of the CSG Justice Center. “But Pennsylvanians aren’t satisfied with simply treading water. They are counting on this process to curb costs while recalibrating our system so that resources are directed at strategies that can lower crime and recidivism rates.”To support the state’s new initiative, Gov. Wolf today also established a bipartisan working group of 35 representatives from the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of state and local government, as well as other criminal justice stakeholders.“I am honored to lead this bipartisan panel of experts as we work together to reform our criminal justice system in ways that make our communities safer, enrich the lives of those involved in the system and protect the interests of taxpayers,” said Josh Shapiro, chairman of the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency and chair of the working group. “Working together we will develop a comprehensive policy package that will strengthen our Commonwealth.”Throughout the year, the working group will guide the CSG Justice Center’s analysis of state and local criminal justice system data in order to develop policy options for introduction in the General Assembly during the 2017 legislative session.Chief Justice Thomas G. Saylor, who has joined the Governor and Legislative Leaders in supporting the process, noted: “Justice reinvestment provides a clear opportunity to do a thoughtful analysis of our criminal justice challenges. Judges, who are carrying out innovative practices in courtrooms across the commonwealth, have valuable perspectives that will help the working group identify practical policy alternatives.”The new initiative also received bi-partisan and bi-cameral support from all four chairs of the General Assembly’s Judiciary Committees.“The first wave of criminal justice reforms have finally started to drive down Pennsylvania’s inmate population and costs and have provided a means of investing in successful strategies to further drive down incarceration; however, this was just the beginning,” said Sen. Stewart Greenleaf. “We have broken the barriers to rethinking corrections policies on all fronts from rehabilitating non-violent drug offenders, to addressing mandatory minimum sentences, and expunging minor criminal records. I look forward to working with our partners on this latest justice reinvestment initiative to find more reforms and strategies to further reduce Pennsylvania’s inmate population and corrections spending.”“Working together to find effective and efficient ways to improve public safety is a fundamental responsibility of state government,” Rep. Ron Marsico said.“JRI has helped us reduce our prison population and costs,” Sen. Daylin Leach said. “It should be refined and continued, but it’s also time to consider whether spending tax dollars on lengthy prison sentences for nonviolent offenders make us any safer.”“In this first year serving as Judiciary Chairman, I have already seen the stark differences in outcomes across populations, counties, and offenses.,” Rep. Joseph Petrarca. “It is clear that we need to do more to control costs, protect the public, and improve outcomes for families”The CSG Justice Center has helped 24 other states—including West Virginia, North Carolina, and Ohio—apply the justice reinvestment approach. The initiative is made possible through funding from The Pew Charitable Trusts and the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolfcenter_img Pennsylvania Leaders Launch Public Safety Initiative to Tackle Drivers of Cost, Incarceration, and Recidivismlast_img read more

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El Gobernador Wolf destaca las funciones de la Agencia de Manejo de Emergencias de PA y de la Guardia Nacional en respuesta a la pandemia

first_img May 18, 2020 El Gobernador Wolf destaca las funciones de la Agencia de Manejo de Emergencias de PA y de la Guardia Nacional en respuesta a la pandemia Español,  Press Release,  Public Health Cuando se trata de una crisis, estar preparados es fundamental. Hoy el Gobernador Tom Wolf destacó los papeles cruciales que desempeñan la Agencia de Manejo de Emergencias de Pennsylvania (PEMA, por sus siglas en inglés) y la Guardia Nacional de PA en la coordinación de la preparación y la respuesta del estado a la COVID-19. En una conferencia de prensa, al Gobernador se le unió el Director de PEMA, Randy Padfield, y el Coronel Frank Montgomery de la Guardia Nacional de PA.“Pennsylvania tiene un gran equipo que trabaja detrás de escena para coordinar nuestra respuesta al coronavirus”, dijo el Gobernador Wolf. “Quiero garantizar a todos los residentes de Pennsylvania que estamos en buenas manos con los equipos de PEMA y la Guardia Nacional. El entrenamiento y la planificación que realizan durante todo el año se prueba durante los ejercicios, y toda esa experiencia se pone en práctica ahora”.Junto con el Departamento de Salud (DOH, por sus siglas en inglés), PEMA ha estado observando al virus desde enero y estableció el centro de operaciones del DOH en PEMA antes de que el virus fuera detectado por primera vez en los Estados Unidos.El Centro de Coordinación de Respuesta del Estado (CRCC, por sus siglas en inglés) de PEMA, que generalmente se utiliza solo durante emergencias climáticas, se puso en marcha plenamente solo unas semanas más tarde para complementar los esfuerzos de planificación y coordinación del personal de docenas de organismos estatales y federales, y socios.PEMA trabaja con organismos de manejo de emergencias en cada uno de los 67 condados del estado para identificar y eliminar posibles problemas al proporcionar la guía y el apoyo necesarios para ejecutar sus planes de emergencia locales únicos. Estos incluyen la coordinación de los sitios de pruebas basados en la comunidad en el condado de Montgomery y, más recientemente, en el condado de Luzerne en el noreste con la Guardia Nacional de PA.“Estos sitios cumplen un papel crucial en la realización de pruebas a personas sintomáticas para comprender mejor la propagación del virus, especialmente en las áreas más afectadas del estado”, dijo el Director de PEMA, Randy Padfield. “Este es solo un ejemplo de los esfuerzos de coordinación que gestiona PEMA. Mantenemos nuestro compromiso de ayudar al Departamento de Salud, a otros organismos estatales y a los condados a responder a la crisis de la COVID-19 y a mitigar los efectos secundarios y terciarios de una crisis tan compleja y a largo plazo”.El Gobernador enfatizó el papel de PEMA en la obtención del sistema de descontaminación de cuidados intensivos de Battelle en el condado de Delaware por parte del gobierno federal. El servicio gratuito para descontaminar ciertas máscaras N95 ayuda a los proveedores de atención médica y a los socorristas de primera línea a prolongar la vida útil de los equipos de protección personal (PPE) al poder reutilizar estas máscaras de manera segura. El Gobernador resaltó que más centros médicos deben aprovechar este servicio.La Guardia Nacional de PA, presente todos los días en el Centro de Coordinación de Respuesta del Estado (CRCC), ha estado trabajando para brindar apoyo a los sitios de pruebas masivas y a los hogares de ancianos del estado que requieren más ayuda de la que se puede brindar con el personal del centro médico. Hasta el día de hoy, la Guardia ha asistido a 10 establecimientos de enfermería en el estado, que incluye a Brighton Rehabilitation and Wellness Center en el condado de Beaver.El Coronel Frank Montgomery brindó información sobre el papel que desempeña la Guardia en Brighton y otros centros médicos.“Los equipos se crearon para incluir asistentes médicos profesionales, enfermeras, médicos y fuerzas de propósito general para brindar apoyo a la dotación del personal, al igual que toda capacitación necesaria sobre el uso de los equipos de protección personal, los procedimientos para colocarlos y retirarlos, y las medidas de descontaminación”, dijo el Coronel Frank Montgomery, director del Apoyo Militar a la Guardia Nacional de Pennsylvania. “Es un honor para nosotros trabajar codo a codo con otro personal de atención de cuidado a largo plazo para prestar servicios a esta población vulnerable. Hasta la fecha, hemos brindado más de 3,500 días de apoyo a la dotación del personal a 10 centros médicos de cuidado a largo plazo, y actualmente todavía brindamos asistencia a cinco centros médicos”.PEMA trabaja mano a mano con la Guardia Nacional de Pennsylvania en sus misiones, que además de asistir a los hogares de ancianos, realiza tareas que van desde la distribución de alimentos hasta el establecimiento de sitios de pruebas masivas.“Los residentes de Pennsylvania no han tenido que preocuparse de que perdamos la ayuda federal por desastre, no han tenido que preocuparse de que los centros de 9-1-1 se vean saturados, y no han tenido que preocuparse de que no se atienda a otras emergencias durante la pandemia”, dijo el Gobernador Wolf. “Eso es todo porque PEMA hace su trabajo de manera eficiente y eficaz”.View this information in Spanish.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Celebrate cup from trackside unit

first_img“Ascot House residents will … benefit from the amazing lifestyle amenities on their doorstep including the restaurant-lined Racecourse Rd.” Damien Nielsen, his wife Jane and their sons Hunter, 8, and Archie, 5.Melbourne Cup fan Damien Nielsen, his wife Jane and their young sons moved into Mirvac’s Ascot Green development’s first stage, Ascot House, in July. Taringa design capitalises on Brisbane city view Mr Nielsen said initially he wasn’t sure he and the family would be able to embrace the apartment lifestyle.“Initially, I was 50/50, I had a foot either side,” he said. >>FOLLOW EMILY BLACK ON FACEBOOK<< Families opt for apartments, over house and land Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:46Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:46 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenChoosing an apartment to invest in01:47 Developer ditched cookie-cutter design at West End community Ascot Green is part of the overall $1.2 billion Eagle Farm masterplan.“We still owned a house, but we bought the unit and I gave my wife the option to move in and she jumped at the opportunity.“I had reservations when we let our house and I hadn’t agreed to a lease with anyone and when we moved in I really did see the benefits.”“I only realised then how much your house actually encumbers you.” The first stage consists of Ascot House, which was completed this year and will also include Tulloch House a second tower adjacent to Ascot House with similar amenities, apartment product and expansive views across the track, with construction yet to begin.Mr Nielsen said while the racecourse wasn’t running races for this year’s Melbourne Cup event, if it was they would have a great view from their apartment.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours ago“I always attend Melbourne Cup events in Brisbane. I am not an every weekend punter, but I certainly go to all the major events,” he said.“We were very lucky, we registered interest to buy the unit, when it first went public.“When we moved into the area nearly 20 years ago, we knew of the development, and I said to my wife that we’d always buy a unit there, regardless.”Mr Nielsen said at the time he purchased he was able to secure a unit with the view he wanted, which was a winning post view with the main straight. “We bought it straight away.” Ascot House has an 800sq m roof terrace and elevated pool deck overlooking the racetrack.He said since moving in, they had cemented themselves with the local community through the use of local communal spaces.“The development has a very spacious rooftop terrace with a large pool, and then we have the use of … a large grass area running against the racecourse, and the Brisbane Racing Club has generously let us use the areas around the racecourse.“There is still some very big parkland areas and I can spend more time there outside kicking a football and there are more areas to do it. “Whereas in a backyard on a 600sq m block, if you kick the ball hard enough it will be over the neighbour’s fence, but now I can kick and throw as I go and the boys can go chase it.”Mirvac Queensland residential development general manager Warwick Bible said Ascot Green was geared towards owner-occupiers. MORE: Mr Nielsen said when the family had lived in their five-bedroom house, Hunter, 8, and Archie, 5, shared a bedroom, as they continue to do in the three-bedroom apartment.“I’ve made them bunk up together … just so they could learn to share,” he said.“It teaches them important skills.” Inside one of the Ascot House apartments.“They are seeking generous floorplans, extra-large balconies and open outlooks, making Ascot House incredibly attractive,” Mr Bible said. RELATED:last_img read more

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Dominican warring for God in Barbados

first_imgLocalNews Dominican warring for God in Barbados by: – April 16, 2012 Sharing is caring! Share Nayan Warrington (GP)Nayan Warrington is all about praising the name of the Lord from the highest mountain top.With his new single Servant getting heavy rotation on Pulse Radio 365, the psychology with sociology major at the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, is looking to not only balance his schoolwork with a musical career, but to also make sure not to limit himself.Nayan’s desire is to reach international status, while not losing the messages.“Most of my music still has that reggae feel to it. Sometimes I just want to be mellow and at other times I can be radical with the message. Based on the inspiration, there can be a switch,” he told the SUNDAY SUN.Nayan is looking to release two more singles and is working hard towards his debut album In Due Season “if everything goes as planned”.“Still I say whenever God is ready, then that will happen. I also have some music videos which I am working on, which should be exciting. One of them being the released single Mr Warrington.”The 24-year-old was born in Dominica to Reverend Martin and Rosemund Warrington. After moving to England at age ten for two years, the family returned to Dominica. His mum was then offered a job in Barbados and the family moved here in 2003.Nayan attended Louis Lynch Secondary School and then Samuel Jackman Prescod Polytechnic.His musical career began at age 14, when he entered a singing competition in Dominica with a group and placed third. But that’s where it started and ended . . . until he came to Barbados and the passion was rebirthed.“From Dominica I realized my talent for writing. [In Barbados] I was first introduced to the chorale group Hosanna Ministries and then the band Ordained Synergy where I was one of the lead vocalists, and main writer. My parents were always full of enthusiasm and behind me 100 per cent. They loved the fact that that was the path I chose as a young man and supported me in whatever way they could.”Being in the music industry was never planned or at the forefront of his mind, he explained, but at some point he knew that this direction was inevitable. He credits St Matthew, Stitchie, Da Truth, Mr Lynx, Jay Square and Gitta Dan with inspiring him.“I have developed a great friendship with most of them.”Nayan says the messages through his music are of love, power, peace and authority in Jesus.“My music speaks of introspection; it carries a very powerful message of self-evaluation and questions we can all ask ourselves. My music speaks to me as well and of my experiences.“I grew up as a pastor’s kid and strayed during my early teenage years. The depth of my experiences has put me in a position to be more passionate in what I do for this generation and the ones to come.”Five nominationsHe has been nominated for five Flame Awards, at monthend, including New Artiste Of The Year Songwriter Of The Year and Original Song Of The Year with the track People In The World.“I am very proud of myself and so were those close to me when I mentioned it to them. I am also humbled that the music which is God-given can be recognized and appreciated by those who listen. I will be very grateful and thankful for whatever award I receive.”He says his writing process is an amazing experience whether he writes for himself or other artistes.“I just love when God pours into my spirit what He would have me teach and speak to His people.My strategy is to keep Him in mind and focus on whom I want the song to reach.“It gives a greater sense of motivation for the task at hand. My inspiration can occur at the oddest time and places.”Nayan reflected on the concept behind People In The World.“This song was so amazing in that it was not planned. One day I was in the studio with one of my producers David ‘Maestro’ Graham just vibing and I asked him to put on some autotune because I had never recorded with that effect before.“He pulled up this reggae beat and I went into the booth. It was pure freestyle and I believe that the message in it came clear to me.“We recorded, then sent that to my fellow artiste Michael ‘Bishop’ Holford who said he’d love to be a part of this song.“We decided to do it. It relates to people across the globe who go through struggles and turn away from God. The lyrics simply ask God to watch over them no matter what situation they are faced with and plead with them to look to God where their help comes from. I am now in the process of doing a music video that will give a broader illustration of the concept.”Nayan says one of the biggest challenges doing gospel music is living what he sings; he tries to live by the mantra “practise what you preach”.He added that some people may feel that gospel singers are immune to struggles and testings, but they sometimes face it even harder. Nayan says he is happy for the privilege of collaborating with international gospel artists like St Matthew and David Irie out of Jamaica; performing at events such as SonFest and Gospelfest; and having a chance to be featured on songs with artistes such as Hoszia Hinds, Neil Crichlow and Life and Bishop, just to name a few.What he is hoping for in 2012 is to connect with more people and reach them on a one on one level by ministering to them through his chosen career of being a messenger of God.BY NATANGA SMITH HURDLENation News Tweetcenter_img Share Share 56 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

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Argos Stumble in Final Round

first_imgArgos Stumble in Final Round May 2, 2007LAKELAND, Fla. – Fourth-ranked West Florida had their sights set on competing for an NCAA II National Championship on their home course at Stonebrook Country Club in Pace, Fla. Unfortunately for head coach Robin Dezarn’s Argonauts, they missed their chance by finishing third at the NCAA II South Regional Championships at The Club at Eaglebrooke in Lakeland, Fla. on Wednesday.Top-ranked Florida Southern won the south regional with a 42-over 906 (298-313-295). Second-ranked Rollins held on to second place with a 47-over 911 (304-307-300). The top two teams and top two individuals not on one of the advancing teams will qualify for the NCAA II Women’s National Championships on May 9-12.West Florida shot a 63-over 927 (304-308-315). The Argonauts finished the second round just one stroke off the lead, but finished today’s final round 21 shots behind Florida Southern and 16 shots behind Rollins.Natalia Espinosa (Bogota, Colombia) finished the tournament as West Florida’s top golfer in 12th place. She shot a 15-over 231 (76-72-83). Sarah Nicholson (Cedar Falls, Iowa / Cedar Falls HS) was tied for 14th with a 16-over 232 (75-79-78). Clara Fornella (Montevideo, Uruguay) shot a 19-over 235 (77-79-79) and finished tied for 19th. Vicky Jackson (Ft. Walton Beach, Fla. / Ft. Walton Beach HS) finished 22nd with a 23-over 239 (76-78-85), and Rachel Christ (Charlotte, N.C./Robinson HS) finished 32nd with a 38-over 254 (88-91-75).Medalist honors were shared by Nova Southeastern’s Maria Garcia Austt and Laura Fourdraine of Rollins. Both players shot a four-over par 220 for the tournament, but Fourdraine had to overcome a three-stroke deficit to earn the top spot.For detailed results check the “schedule/results” page at women’s golf on www.goargos.com. All six teams competing in the south regional were ranked nationally in the top seven. The south region was by far the most competitive region in the countryPrint Friendly Version Sharelast_img read more

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