Digital Week lecture examines ethical use of robots

first_imgAt a lecture last night, philosophy professor Don Howard was introduced by a robot.To kick off Notre Dame’s second annual digital week, Howard delivered a lecture discussing the ethical issues regarding the widespread implementation of robots. After a screen attached to a mobile stand projected the face of a man named Elliot who introduced Howard, the professor said something which quickly proved difficult to refute.“There is a revolution underway that is going to transform our world more rapidly and more radically than even the Internet and information revolution did. This is the robotics revolution,” Howard said.This will be even more widespread than the industrial revolution, he said. Both individuals with jobs in the service industry and those requiring higher education are being threatened by mechanization. Howard said this could lead to the unemployment of hundreds of thousands of people.“Already we’re seeing the almost total displacement of human drivers by wholly automated transport,” he said. “Personally, I think this is the single biggest ethical problem facing us today in connection with robotics.”With this advent of widespread robots and their increased capability, Howard stressed caution is of the utmost importance when implementing these machines.“In the past, we have made some really huge mistakes with technology,” Howard said. “We failed to anticipate what the downstream, long-term consequences of a carbon fueled economy were going to be, and now we pay the price for that failure.”However, Howard said the ethical implications of this sort of replacement are not all negative.“Driver error is the ultimate cause behind most fatal accidents,” Howard said. “In theory, we could save 30,000 lives in the U.S. alone and 1.2 million lives globally every year if we replaced human drivers with self-driving cars.”This benefit is impossible to discount, Howard said. Another similar, near future use for robots could include using teleprompters like the one used to introduce Howard earlier to actively engage bedridden students in the classroom, he said. Howard said he expected schools and universities like Notre Dame to begin implementing similar systems soon.“What is a robot?” he asked. “Not all robots have humanoid features. … We cannot let uncertainty about the consequences of new technologies simply stifle technological development because, as we all know, there are many examples of new technologies which are, for the most part, for the good of human kind.”Howard urged those attending the lecture to rethink what they consider to be robots. By doing so, their greater capacity for good might be revealed. Rather than create robots and then discuss their ethical implications, Howard said the two processes should be intertwined.“I think that we need to build a world in which engagement with ethics is an everyday part of the world,” he said.Howard also said it is ultimately humans who determine the ethical implementation of robots. Nobody else is going to ensure this is done fairly.“Why are most humanistic robots white or Asian?” asked Howard. “And why do so many of those robots have attractive female features? Have you ever seen an African-American robot?”According to Howard, humans need to carefully watch themselves to ensure this robotic revolution happens in an ethical manner. It is not the machines which we need to fear. Any concerns regarding an emotionally complex or sentient robot should be distant thoughts, Howard said.“Whatever you do, don’t turn to Hollywood for advice,” he said. “There is no robot apocalypse in the offing.”Tags: Digital Week, ethics, robotslast_img read more

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SMC seniors host Dad’s Weekend

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Katie Morrissette Saint Mary’s senior class invited their fathers to a variety of events at Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame this past weekend for the annual Senior Dad’s Weekend.Class president CoCo Craig said the tradition of inviting fathers to campus has been part of the Saint Mary’s experience for decades.Craig said she spoke with a professor and alumna of Saint Mary’s who said when she went to Saint Mary’s, dads would come to spend the weekend with their daughters.“There’s always been an event for at least 50 years where dads would come to bond with their daughters,” she said.More than 425 people were registered for the weekend, Craig said, which was about 50 more people than expected. Craig said the weekend started with registration and a welcome reception with snacks and beverages. She said that different vendors from the area had stands at the reception and a percentage of everything the vendors sold went to the class. Saturday started with a tour of Notre Dame Stadium, which included the north tunnel entrance, the locker room and the “Play Like a Champion Today” sign, Craig said. Afterwards, students and their fathers were free to spend the rest of the day on their own, an opportunity which most people took to dine at South Bend restaurants and watch the Notre Dame football game. The Saturday night dinner was held at the Century Center in downtown South Bend, Craig said.“President [Carol Ann] Mooney spoke at the dinner,” Craig said. “We also had a silent auction during the dinner. … It can range from sports game tickets to any kind of goodie basket.”Craig said the weekend is a chance for students to spend time with their fathers while at school. “[Students] have personal time that they wouldn’t normally have at school to hang out with your dad,” Craig said. “They also get to meet everyone else’s family and their fathers. It’s a really fun experience that usually people don’t get to do while at school.” Craig said it is important to have Dad’s Weekend as part of senior year at the College.“At that point, you can show your dad all of the activities you do on the weekends and all of the fun places you like to go,” Craig said. “At the same time, you have your friend group. You know your friends and by that time, you can bond with everyone. All the dads can bond together and all the daughters can bond together. Basically, everyone can have quality time together.”Tags: Class of 2016, saint mary’s, senior dadslast_img read more

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Course organizes prayer service in honor of DACA recipients

first_imgRosie LoVoi | The Observer Becky Ruvalcaba, assistant director of multicultural ministry in Campus Ministry, speaks in the Geddes Hall chapel on Monday at a prayer service honoring DACA recipients. A course known as “Advocacy for the Common Good” organized and hosted the service.Members of the Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross College community gathered in the Geddes Hall chapel on Monday for a prayer service in honor of recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.Hosted by members of the “Advocacy for the Common Good” — a one credit course that aims to inform students of advocacy tools and mechanisms — the prayer vigil featured two speakers, Juan Constantino, development director of program staffing at La Casa de Amistad, and Becky Ruvalcaba, assistant director of multicultural ministry in Campus Ministry. The course, offered by the Center for Social Concerns, is taught by Michael Hebbeler, the Director for Discernment and Advocacy at the Center for Social Concerns, focuses on the building of a DREAM Act campaign as a focal point for the class to rally behind. The timeline of the class’s advocacy strategy was altered with the announcement that the congressional vote was moved up from March 8 to Thursday.Freshman Grace Stephenson, chair of the event team, said the class chose a prayer vigil as its platform of advocacy because it embodies the Catholic identity of the University.“This is not a protest but a chance for the community to come together in solidarity for the 40 plus DACA students on the three campuses,” Stephenson said.Jackie Navarro, a junior at Holy Cross College and member of the event planning team, said this issue is a big part of the campus identity.“We can’t just be Catholic by name,” Navarro said.Following an opening prayer, Ruvalcaba spoke on the definition of an eligible DACA candidate. She provided the government definition and then incorporated scripture.“There’s a moral and spiritual commitment we all have a role to play,” she said. “Regulation and security are necessary, but Catholic social teaching dictates that all initiatives be oriented for the common good.”Costantino followed with his own testimony as an recipient of DACA. He told stories of growing up in South Bend with the constant fear of deportation and the opportunities Holy Cross provided him with scholarships. “Like many other DACA recipients, I’m the member of a mixed family with undocumented, DACA registered and citizen members.” The prayer service concluded with a prayer to St. Frances Cabrini, the patron saint of immigrants. Stephenson said one of the biggest obstacle with the nature of advocacy is increasing participation when not everyone has a personal stake in the issue.Junior and member of the event team, Rathin Kacham, said he is a DACA recipient himself, having immigrated from India. He said he credits the support he’s received on campus with having encouraged him to become more public about his status as a DACA recipient.“We all probably have friends who are on DACA and don’t want anyone to know,” Kacham said. “There’s a fear that comes with that status, but it also can be liberated.” Tags: Center for Social Concerns, DACA, Dream Act, Geddes Hall, La Casa de Amistadlast_img read more

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Corcoran, Ogden reflect on accomplishments thus far while looking toward next semester

first_imgCorcoran and Ogden are moving forward with many of the key aspects of their platform. Though the pair is working hard on their initiatives, they could benefit from better communication with the student body as a whole. Much of their progress is not known by a majority of the student body, and they would benefit from better publicity.Grade: A-Tags: 2018 Student Government Insider, Corcoran-Ogden, Saint Mary’s Student Government Association Seniors Madeleine Corcoran and Kathy Ogden, president and vice president of Saint Mary’s Student Government Association (SGA), said they were prepared for many things during their time as leaders — except former College President Jan Cervelli’s resignation. Regardless of this occurrence, Corcoran said the transition from Cervelli to Interim College President Nancy Nekvasil was smooth and an opportunity for Corcoran and Ogden to work well with the administration. “I think overall, this transition was much smoother than anyone probably would have expected. We had such great support, especially from [vice president of student affairs] Karen Johnson, [vice president for mission] Judy Fean, [Interim] President Nekvasil, of course, and [chair of the board of trustees] Mary Burke,” Corcoran said. “ … That’s why we had the All-Student Assembly, so we could have as open and honest of a conversation as possible for students. We’re obviously here to answer any questions, but we know just as much as everyone else, so it was good, I think, for everyone to hear from those people who are the new leaders of the College.”Nekvasil has been willing to work with the pair in achieving their goals this semester, Corcoran said.“We love President Nekvasil. She’s been so helpful in working with us, and she’s really here for the students, which I think is something super special and important in a president,” Corcoran said. “She knows Saint Mary’s so well, so we’ve been really fortunate to have that because [Cervelli’s resignation] was definitely unexpected and could have had a lot of hard road blocks along the way, but we’ve been really fortunate.”Corcoran said she and Ogden have been able to work toward accomplishing many of the points on their platform, specifically getting Blinkie, the student shuttle, running on Sundays and enhancing a few technological aspects on campus.“We’ve been working very hard to get a couple things done. One is printing from your own device. … That hopefully will be implemented very soon,” she said. “They worked very hard on it over fall break when students were gone. Also, we’re working on a ‘This Week at SMC’ newsletter that will be like a weekly email with all the events instead of so many all-SMC emails.”Ogden said another initiative from the team’s platform is to enhance Campus Ministry events. To this end, the team began “Lemonade and Le Mans” Mass on Wednesday evenings.“On Wednesdays at the 9 p.m. Mass in Le Mans, they have popcorn and lemonade,” Ogden said. “I talked to Tara Nelson, who is an [executive] for mission, and she said that normally they had maybe eight girls at Mass, but the attendance has gotten up to 25, 30 girls at Mass. They hang around and they eat popcorn and drink lemonade. [Corcoran] and I have been able to go to quite a few of those Masses, and it worked out well.”Another major part of the job has been addressing day-to-day issues, Ogden said.“Things pop up, and you don’t realize you need to work on it, so we did,” she said. “Having graduation — there was an initiative to move it inside of Angela, so we really fought hard for the students, and it’s now officially outside of Le Mans, weather permitting.”The pair also recognized a need to enhance the collaborative spaces available on campus, Ogden said, such as the SGA office located on the second floor of the Student Center.“We’re redoing the SGA office. [Corcoran] and I saw that it was a well-used office,” she said. “All the clubs and organizations are welcome to use it, and they each have closets. That’s taken a good amount of time, and hopefully after Christmas break, it’ll be completely finished. It’ll be nice for all the students to use.”Another way the team hoped to enhance collaboration and communication between the leaders of SGA’s Big Boards — Residence Hall Association, Student Diversity Board, Student Activities Board, Class Council and Student Government Association — was to switch from weekly to biweekly meetings, Ogden said.“[The meetings] are biweekly, but we’re able to sit down and have a longer meeting where it’s very much discussion-based,” she said. “We’re all more engaged. It’s not just a tap in, quick meeting, so we’re all really engaged in what each Big Board is doing. It’s conversation-based, and I think that’s really helped with collaborating with all the clubs and organizations.”Though many of the pair’s initiatives focus on the Saint Mary’s community specifically, Corcoran said they are working on a major event to unite the members of the surrounding community.“There’s already a ‘Back the Bend’ event that Saint Mary’s is already a part of, but Student Government is hoping to promote it more and be a greater part of it this year,” Corcoran said. “That’s in the spring, so our community co-chairs will be working on that more specifically to hopefully build, first of all, community within the tri-campus community, but as well as South Bend in general, our greater community.”Corcoran and Ogden have been continuing work on past initiatives, Corcoran said, like expanding the uses of Munch Money.“We talked to Karen Johnson about it very early on this year as well as Ken Acosta. They’re very much supportive of it,” she said. “They said for this year it’d be hard, but they see the need, and they’re working on seeing what options are the best for Saint Mary’s students and the most feasible. I definitely think we’ll work on it more. At first we thought it’d be a two or three-year timeline for the project, but we think even next year it might be a possibility, so that’s great.”Throughout the semester of work, both Corcoran and Ogden said they could not have achieved what they have without one another and the other board members.“[Ogden] and I definitely lean on each other at times, too,” Corcoran said. “If one of us has a tough week, I think we’re pretty good about being able to say, ‘Can you go to this meeting this week?’ or ‘Can you send the emails?’ or something like that. I definitely couldn’t do it without [Ogden] and our entire student government board. Everyone is so great at doing their jobs, so we don’t have to be sending reminders constantly or anything like that, which is really important.”As the two continue working toward the end of their positions, Corcoran said she’s hoping for a smooth transition to the next pair of SGA leaders.“I think something that’s really important is that transition to whoever’s in our position next year, so that we can really clearly explain exactly what we have done so far and where we’re at, so if anything isn’t finished that they feel that it’s an important enough item to complete,” Corcoran said. “Hopefully that way we can have a smooth transition and strong communication with next year’s president and vice president is definitely something really important to us.”last_img read more

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Fisher Hall to host annual regatta

first_imgStudents, alumni and friends of Notre Dame will gather at St. Mary’s Lake at 1 p.m. for the annual Fisher Regatta. The dorm will provide free food and music for its signature event, which invites residence halls and campus organizations to participate in a boat race.  This year, funds will go toward St. Adalbert Catholic School in South Bend, junior Frank Dijak, the event’s commissioner, said.“This year, [the raised funds are] for air conditioning in the junior high,” Dijak said.Previous fundraising had gone toward a new gym floor, AC units, new concrete slabs and a new check-in area at the school, senior Dan Blackburn said.While most funds come from t-shirt sales, in addition to the small fee to enter a boat, Dijak said a few independent fundraisers on Eddy Street this semester and proceeds from Fisher Hall’s fall signature event, the car smash, will also be donated to St. Adalbert. Courtesy of Frank Dijak One of Fisher Hall’s boats compete in their namesake regatta on St. Mary’s Lake.Sophomore Owen Donnelly said the hall purposefully chose to hold the Regatta before finals.“Having the Regatta at the end of the year is nice, because everyone looks forward to it the entire year [and it’s] the culmination of all the year’s events, and by that point, everyone’s already great friends, so you can really enjoy it together,” Donnelly said. For the men of Fisher, the Regatta is rooted in tradition, and they rally together in preparation for the event, Dijak said. Freshmen often adopt “Regatta Hawks” for the event, Donnelly said, and some even shave the letter F into the back of their heads. Blackburn said the upperclassmen hype the Regatta as early as Welcome Weekend to the incoming freshman, telling them it is ranked as one of ESPN’s top 100 student-run college events. “It’s never been disproven,” Donnelly said. On the day of the race, the hall wakes up at 7 a.m., when residents bang on doors with rowing oars. Two freshmen are chosen to drive a golf cart, coined the “Toro,” with a speaker and megaphone around campus. “They go around campus telling people that it’s the day of the Regatta,” Dijak said. Blackburn noted the diverse representation of student groups around campus who participate in the event. “A lot of people have somebody that they can root for in the race, whether it’s their dorm, friends they know in a club [or] an organization they are a part of,” Blackburn said. “Everybody has something they can cheer for.” Dijak said the Regatta effectively fosters both community and competition on campus. “I think [the Regatta is] one of the few signature events that asks for participation from a lot of halls and gets participation from a lot of halls. The Keenan Revue is also a big event, but it really doesn’t require anybody but Keenan to put it on,” Dijak said. “There are a lot of people who have tried to mimic the Regatta. … We have been pretty successful in getting usually around 20 halls to participate.”Dijak encouraged students to come out the event and enjoy the day.“Part of the Notre Dame experience is to go the Fisher Regatta,” Dijak said.Tags: 25th annual Fisher Regatta, boats, fisher halllast_img read more

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Law enforcement discusses safety with students

first_imgLocal law enforcement responded to questions about the new dorm swipe access policy, emergency blue lights on campus, discrimination at Notre Dame and other student safety concerns during a panel hosted by student government and the Notre Dame Police Department (NDPD) in the LaFortune Ballroom on Wednesday night.Panelists included NDPD captain Rob Martinez, NDPD major George Heeter, NDPD deputy chief Steve Smith and major Steve Noonan of the St. Joseph County Police Department. Attendees were invited to submit questions through the app, Poll Everywhere, or ask them publicly using a microphone.Natalie Weber | The Observer Multiple questions centered around whether NDPD has considered increasing the number of blue light phone systems, which are mainly located on the perimeter of Notre Dame’s campus. There are about 65 blue light emergency stations on campus currently, Martinez said. Smith said there has been discussion about increasing the number of blue lights, but currently, they are not used very frequently.“I think folks know where they are, and they know they can utilize them anytime they want, but to be quite honest, very few calls … are actually coming through those devices,” Smith said. “So if there is a need to increase [blue light emergency stations], we would certainly do that, but again we don’t get a lot of information or a lot of requests for service through those.”Several attendees also raised questions about safety following the implementation of the new dorm swipe access policy, which restricts students’ swipe access to their own dorms. Questions raised were concerns about people allowing strangers into their dorms, and attendees asked if there were any policies in the works to address this issue.Smith said he doesn’t know of any pending policies yet that are to be implemented in the dorms soon.“The one thing I would suggest is make sure you never leave a door propped open,” Smith said. “That’s been an issue in the past. … We encourage you not to do that, because it invites folks to come on in anytime they want. So to the extent that you can, I would ask that you monitor who comes in and not necessarily just let anybody in.”In response, one attendee submitted a question, raising concerns that women in particular might not feel comfortable turning away men who come to their dorms. The question asked if “full-time clerks” could be implemented in dorms to monitor who enters and exits.“That would be a great solution,” Smith said. “However, I think trying to staff an entrance like that is challenging.”Smith said NDPD has also considered installing cameras at the entrances of dorms to keep track of who comes into the dorm.“It’s early on in those discussions, but that is something that could help mitigate some of that,” he said. “And I understand it’s challenging. So what I would recommend, again, is getting to know your officers in the building. If there’s certain times of day that this is becoming an issue, let your officers know. Make them aware of that, and we can set extra patrols during that time.”In response, a student asked why the dorm swipe access policy was implemented, and suggested tracking students’ entrance to dorms with ID cards would be easier than other proposed safety solutions.“I think the University would have a perfect solution to address that issue, but it is very challenging to utilize a card so that every single person has to go through and that access is recorded, so we have documentation of that,” Smith said. “Again, that comes down to a University decision.”Martin added that the policy mirrored what other schools have enacted.“There was some benchmarking done on the process,” he said. “They’ve also been following some other universities that have actually implemented this policy.One question asked about how NDPD would response to racist slurs and threats to students of color on campus, especially in light of threats to minority students at Syracuse. NDPD is also investigating reports of “biased slurs” directed toward students Friday and Saturday that sparked a protest against hate speech.“Obviously, that’s something we want folks to report to us,” Smith said. “If you see behavior like that, or you learn of behavior like that, we want to know about it right away.”In response to a question about discrimination against LGBTQ students, law enforcement also encouraged students to report incidents to the police.Smith also discussed options for students who report sexual assault to law enforcement.“You have the option of saying ‘I want Notre Dame Police Department and the investigative team in Notre Dame Police Department to investigate that,’” he said. “Or, in St. Joseph County, we also have a Special Victims Unit … and as a student, you have the option of opting for them to investigate that crime as well.”When asked about safety in South Bend, Noonan recommended traveling in groups and being aware of one’s location. He also explained the situations that generally give rise to violence in South Bend.“Generally that violence is directed for a variety of reasons,” he said. “Sometimes it’s gang activity, sometimes a social media post can trigger violence. … The best thing for students is to stay in a group [and] always know where you’re going.”Heeter offered similar advice.“Know your surroundings, [there’s] strength in numbers, so always be with a group of other individuals,” he said.Tags: NDPD, St Joseph County Police, Student government, student safety summitlast_img read more

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Transfer Nation: Sixteen students embark on first semester at Notre Dame in the spring

first_imgLast week, as most students were returning for their second semester of the 2019-2020 academic year, 16 new undergraduates were beginning their very first semester at Notre Dame, the Office of Undergraduate Admissions reported.“In the fall, the entire University is welcoming new students — new first-year students, new transfer students — we’re all thinking there are new people here,” said Erin Camilleri, the director of transfer enrollment. “In the spring, people are kind of in their zone and doing their thing. So I always think that it’s a little bit harder to transfer in the spring. It takes a student who has a really strong desire to be here.”A wide variety of students choose to matriculate spring semester. Some of these students, Camilleri said, are student-athletes who are starting their athletic training early, the semester before their freshman season begins. Others are students who were admitted for enrollment in the fall but, due to personal circumstances, chose to defer their enrollment until spring semester.A third category of spring enrollees, however, are selected from a separate pool of applicants. These students have attended a different college or university for at least three semesters, Camilleri said, and they have chosen to enroll at Notre Dame halfway through the academic year. Camilleri estimated that about 100 students apply from this third category each year. This year, only four students enrolled from that pool of applicants. The selection process, she said, is highly competitive.When looking at the applications of spring-semester transfers, the University considers how these students will handle the unique transition. First, the University must ensure that these students’ previous coursework will transfer smoothly, keeping the students on track to graduate with their credits, Camilleri said.“The further you get on [in school], the more difficult it is to align a different institution’s curriculum with our curriculum,” Camilleri said. “So we’re really looking to see [the] students get slotted in nicely.”Additionally, Camilleri said the admissions committee considers whether the students will be able to quickly immerse themselves in the Notre Dame community, making connections and friendships even though they are arriving on campus later than most students.“They need to bring a sense of adventure and excitement with them,” she said. “And it takes a student who’s willing to be flexible — [a] student who really want[s] to be here.”New students arriving in the fall begin the semester with four days of programming that’s designed to build community and adjust students to campus life. But for new students arriving in the spring, that Welcome Weekend programming is distilled into only a day and a half, Camilleri said. The spring Welcome Weekend is coordinated and overseen by other transfer students who have already been through the transition.“‘Transfer Nation,’ so to speak — the people who call themselves ‘Transfer Nation’ — they really do look out for one another,” Camilleri said.Junior Nyakeh Tuchscherer transferred after three semesters at St. John’s University, which he attended until the fall of his sophomore year before opting to transfer to Notre Dame. His decision to transfer was largely fueled by his academic interests — Notre Dame offered more resources for research and international opportunities, Tuchscherer said. But the transition — environmentally and socially — was somewhat challenging. Moving from New York City to South Bend, he was not initially prepared for the Notre Dame culture, which is more insular and homogenous than St. John’s, Tuchscherer said. Nevertheless, he’s glad he made the decision to transfer.“I have no regrets [about] transferring, even though it’s totally different and it’s not what I expected,” Tuchscherer said. “I wouldn’t have the opportunities that I’ve been getting today if it weren’t for Notre Dame, so I’m very thankful and glad to be here. That’s a privilege.”Camilleri said students who transfer tend to be highly involved, picking up extracurriculars that help them meet other students and connect with the campus community. Bringing fresh perspectives and strong school spirit, she said they add unique value to the school.“It takes a special person to be a transfer student,” Camilleri said. “I think one of the best things about them is that they have a wonderful sense of excitement for the University. I think that transfer students, as a whole, enrich the student body tremendously.”Tags: Transfer Nation, transfer students, Welcome Weekendlast_img read more

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No New COVID-19 Cases Reported Sunday In Chautauqua County

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Photo: Governor Tom Wolf / CC BY 2.0MAYVILLE – The Chautauqua County COVID-19 Response Team says there were no new cases of the novel Coronavirus reported Sunday.Officials say 21 people remain under a mandatory quarantine, 38 in precautionary quarantine and 22 are placed under mandatory isolation because they are symptomatic of the virus and lab test results are pending.So far the county has received 87 negative test results to date.Health officials continue to meet daily and urge residents to stay home. When in public officials ask residents to follow social distancing guidelines. last_img read more

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Caryl Churchill’s Love and Information to Premiere in the U.S. Off-Broadway

first_img Love and Information Love and Information marks Churchill’s seventh American premiere at New York Theatre Workshop. The play is a theatrical kaleidoscope exploring more than a hundred characters using wit, candor and nimble use of language as they try to make sense of what they find out. View Comments Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on April 6, 2014center_img Churchill’s numerous plays recently include The Skriker, Seneca’s Thyestes,  A Dream Play and Drunk Enough to say I Love You?. Macdonald’s work was last seen at New York Theatre Workshop in 2005 when he directed Churchill’s A Number. His other New York credits include Top Girls, Drunk Enough to Say I Love You?, Dying City and 4.48 Psychosis.  Love and Information will feature scenic design by Miriam Buether, costume design by Gabriel Berry and Andrea Hood, lighting design by Peter Mumford and sound design by Christopher Shutt. The cast includes Phillip James Brannon, Randy Danson, Susannah Flood, Noah Galvin, Jennifer Ikeda, Karen Kandel, Irene Sofia Lucio, Nate Miller, Kellie Overbey, Adante Power, John Procaccino, Lucas Caleb Rooney, Maria Tucci, James Waterston and Zoë Winters. Caryl Churchill’s Love and Information, directed by James Macdonald, is heading to the Minetta Lane Theatre! The off-Broadway show, which was first produced at London’s Royal Court, will begin performances February 4 and is scheduled to run through March 23. Opening night is set for February 19.last_img read more

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Jonathan Groff, Frankie Alvarez & Murray Bartlett Reveal What They’re Looking For On New HBO Series

first_img Jonathan Groff Star Files Broadway fave Jonathan Groff will soon reach a whole new level of stardom when the new HBO series Looking debuts on January 19. Much more than a gay-themed Girls or Sex and the City retread, Looking follows a trio of friends—Groff as awkward but adorable Patrick, Murray Bartlett as about-to-turn-forty Dom and Frankie J. Alvarez as struggling artist Augustín—grappling with gay life in San Francisco. So, why should we care about these guys? Luckily, HBO released a video of the three stars chatting about why everyone—not just gay men—will relate to these characters. Check out the clip below and meet your new favorite TV buds.center_img View Commentslast_img read more

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