By phone and online, the care continues

first_img Managing the coronavirus exodus from campus How the information technology staff moved classes and operations online on a tight, coronavirus-threatened deadline Related Expects to have 1,000 face shields by end of week When it first became known that a novel coronavirus was spreading through Wuhan, China, Harvard University Health Services (HUHS) began preparing for its possible arrival. Since then, HUHS has been working to implement new protocols to serve the Harvard community, even as the majority of students, faculty, and staff left campus.The Gazette spoke with HUHS Executive Director Giang Nguyen about new safety measures, including a shift to remote care by telephone and Zoom-based clinical visits. He also shared a wealth of new resources designed to inform the community about the latest developments.Q&AGiang NguyenGAZETTE:  Your office first communicated with the Harvard community about the coronavirus in late January, before it was evident that COVID-19 would make such an impact worldwide. Would you give us a sense of what your early preparations looked like?NGUYEN:  Early on, as the threat of the virus was starting to be reported elsewhere in the world, HUHS began preparations, knowing that it was likely to affect our community at some point. So, as you mentioned, in late January we began having daily huddles of our internal outbreak response team to ensure that we were all informed about the quickly evolving science, and that we were also on the same page in terms of how we would respond should it arrive in our surrounding communities and on campus. Shortly thereafter, we started meeting on a daily basis with the University’s outbreak response team as well, with the support of Executive Vice President Katie Lapp.We also formed a medical expert advisory group around the same time that included individuals with international expertise in epidemiology, virology, public health, and medicine. And they have been instrumental in guiding the policy and procedural decisions we’ve made at HUHS with regard to COVID-19, as well as the decisions that have been made by the University more broadly. I am particularly glad that we de-densified the campus when we did, and the University benefited tremendously from the input of our medical expert advisory group. Provost Alan Garber has also been very engaged from the beginning, and his expertise as a physician has helped tremendously.We’ve been preparing our clinical staff over the past several months by making sure that all are familiar with the proper protocols for protecting themselves, as well as for recognizing patients who might be at risk for the coronavirus, and for collecting specimens from patients under investigation for COVID-19. These activities have been guided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.What has been unusual about this particular epidemic is that many of these recommendations have changed rapidly over a short period of time. As a result, the things that HUHS did in response had to evolve quickly. Many of our responses have also been influenced not only by the medical and public health knowledge at the time, but also by the degree to which resources were available. For example, as readers undoubtedly know, testing is still quite limited in the region and in America overall, and as a result we have to follow very specific guidelines from the Department of Public Health about whom to prioritize and when to test.GAZETTE:  Do you have the ability to test at HUHS?NGUYEN:  We have the ability to collect the specimens, and these specimens are sent to external laboratories for analysis. The type of testing that is done for COVID-19 requires a laboratory that is different from one in a standard ambulatory health center such as ours. “While clinical care can’t shift entirely to a remote work protocol, we have been able to significantly limit the degree to which patients actually need to come into our office.” Design School turns 3D printers into PPE producers Harvard details coronavirus outbreak planscenter_img GAZETTE:  Have you noticed that HUHS continues to serve a similar clientele since its move to telemedicine?NGUYEN:  We have continued to care for a broad range of patients, including students, faculty, staff, and retirees. This hasn’t changed. Counseling and Mental Health Services (CAMHS), which provides care exclusively to students, is very active, and has been providing remote visits to students all over the country and internationally as needed. CAMHS will soon be resuming group therapy as well, which is another valuable resource for many of our students. The HUHS Behavioral Health Department, which provides counseling and psychiatric services to faculty, staff, and retirees, is keeping the same schedule of patients that they normally keep when we are operating at full scale, with the difference that these are now remote visits.From the medical side, we have also seen a broad range of patients, students and nonstudents, and we’ve seen patients of all age ranges as well. I just heard about one of our clinicians who provided a video visit to a patient in their 80s, and they told me that it went very well. The clinician explained how helpful it was to be able to see the patient on the video screen and to incorporate that into the assessment, and how reassuring it was for the patient to be able to see the physician as well.I also want to point out that the Center for Wellness and Health Promotion has been offering online meditation and yoga sessions that have been hosted through Zoom, and that the Office of Sexual Assault Prevention & Response has continued to offer remote events to educate the community, as well as one-on-one direct support to students through Zoom. The Office of Alcohol & Other Drug Services also continues to provide remote one-on-one services to our students.GAZETTE:  What is the best point of contact for individuals who need to access HUHS services?NGUYEN:  Patients seeking an appointment can reach out to HUHS through our secure online patient portal, or by calling us at 617-495-5711. Due to the safety and physical-distancing issues we talked about before, we discourage patients from walking in for appointments unless they have been advised to do so. If people in the Harvard community want to know more about COVID-19, or if they have questions about what new information is available about the novel coronavirus, since that is changing rapidly, I would recommend that they first start with the Harvard coronavirus website. We are frequently updating that site with new content as the science evolves. The Health and Wellbeing section is a great resource, and HUHS updates this when new information arises. We’ve also included information about how to maintain emotional wellbeing during these stressful and uncertain times.We’ve put together a guidance document on that page that can help individuals understand if they should be self-isolating or quarantining based on their exposures. This has been particularly useful, and I’ve heard from other universities all over the country asking to use that document themselves. If folks have reviewed all of these materials and still have questions, they can reach out to our email address, [email protected], where we can provide answers to nonurgent questions. This is also the address for Harvard affiliates to email if they have tested positive for COVID-19 somewhere outside of HUHS; this allows us to assess the impact on Harvard’s community. We are also available by phone, 24-7, for those who have medically urgent questions that need a response. For example, if someone is experiencing certain symptoms and needs to know whether they should go to an emergency room right now, or whether they should they come in to urgent care, these questions are worth a conversation with us, and our team is available for that.GAZETTE:  Can people be in touch to donate resources or additional supports, as well?NGUYEN:  Harvard has been blessed with an extraordinarily generous community of alumni and donors, and HUHS has received many donations of personal protective equipment (PPE), including masks and respirators. We do not need any additional PPE right now. But while some of these materials are not necessarily needed within HUHS, they might be usable within a critical-care hospital setting. To this end, we have been able to work with our campus partners to share extra supplies with local hospitals. We also encourage people to visit a webpage we’ve built devoted to donations of PPE and other critical supplies. It has been so heartwarming to see the response from members of the worldwide Harvard community who have made donations to us, and we are grateful.This interview has been edited for length and clarity. Campus Services VP Meredith Weenick on Harvard’s work to prevent the spread of disease and help students move out on a tight timeline Turning Harvard virtual Executive Vice President Katie Lapp discusses preparations to ensure safety, health, and productivity of community GAZETTE:  The University has undergone a dramatic shift to virtual learning over the past several weeks. Amid this transition, how has HUHS adapted to provide care as the Harvard community moved to remote study and work?NGUYEN:  While clinical care can’t shift entirely to a remote work protocol, we have been able to significantly limit the degree to which patients actually need to come into our office. We’ve established telephone and video visits through Zoom, and we’ve found that the majority of clinical encounters that we’ve had don’t require a patient setting foot into our space, especially if we can visualize them through Zoom.The reality is, all visits to HUHS could potentially begin with a remote visit, with the exception of something where a person would be calling an ambulance — if a person has crushing chest pain and is unable to breathe, for example. But if it is something that is more of a moderate concern, much of that initial evaluation can be done remotely. When I’m looking at an individual through a video screen, I can see their respiratory effort, and I can observe their overall neurological status because I can see the way they are moving in front of me, I can see how quickly they’re breathing, I can observe whether they are pale or flushed, and I can see how their eyes are moving. I can also observe their emotional affect. All of these things can help guide my decision-making. Of course, there are some things that cannot be done from afar. I cannot press on your liver from across the screen, but if that ends up becoming a necessity based on what I’m seeing, and from what I hear the patient saying, then I might ask a patient to come into our office.Even then, the time on our campus is limited, thanks to the fact that much of the information I need for an in-person consultation is already collected through this remote visit. In some cases, a patient might only need to come in to provide a urine sample or get an X-ray. So, we don’t need to have extended interactions when patients come in, and, in the context of COVID-19, if we can keep an in-person visit as short as possible, that helps everyone.GAZETTE:  What kinds of precautions are in place for patients who do need to come into the office, and for the medical professionals who provide their care?NGUYEN:  We recognize that health care workers are at an extraordinarily increased risk for infection, since they are at the front lines working with patients who may be infected with COVID-19. We have put in place a number of protocols to help protect our staff, and at the same time our patients.We now require masks for anyone who is present within our facilities. This means any clinical and nonclinical staff who are in the office, as well as all patients or visitors. This includes all individuals who are coming in for appointments, or coming into the pharmacy to pick up prescriptions, or coming into the lab for blood tests, or to the radiology suite for X-rays. We also check everyone for fever upon entry, we advise everyone to maintain a six-foot distance from other people, and we limit elevator use to one patient at a time. By doing this, even for those people who don’t have any active symptoms, we are reducing the chance that any one person who might unknowingly be infected could spread that infection to other people.We are also rotating our staff through the office so that only a small percentage are present at HUHS at any given time. That reduces the amount of time that any one staff member spends physically present in our office. The rest of the time they are providing remote care. It also reduces the staff density in our office.GAZETTE:  How have you managed the transition to remote care?NGUYEN:  The transition to video visits is actually something we had started preparing before COVID-19. Once the requirement for physical distancing became the norm for our region, we realized that we needed to move forward with that project at a much faster pace. I have to give a tremendous amount of thanks to our information technology team and our overall COVID-19 response team which has worked so hard to prepare our staff for the transition to telemedicine.This was not an easy lift, and I have been so impressed by the work they’ve done to make this happen and the flexibility my staff and our patients have shown throughout this process. Our patients have been incredibly gracious and thankful that HUHS continues to provide care for them, even at a distance.GAZETTE:  What platforms does HUHS use for providing remote care, and how does HUHS ensure patient confidentiality?NGUYEN:  We use Zoom for remote visits, but what’s different for our version of Zoom, from what students are familiar with in the classroom, is that when a patient receives an invitation for an appointment with HUHS, that Zoom encounter has additional security features that a classroom encounter does not have. Our business agreement with Zoom provides a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant version of the platform.What does this mean in practice? The experience of a patient doesn’t feel that much different from a student in a classroom, except that they are going to be the only other person in the encounter as opposed to a classroom with 300 people. Our security features mean that sessions cannot be recorded and posted online, and each appointment has a unique link provided to the patient that protects against “Zoombombing.” There are additional security features that are largely invisible from the user standpoint. We have been very pleased with our experience with Zoom, and we’re very comfortable with the added security features it allows us.last_img read more

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Moving IT-as-a-Service from Conversation to Transformation

first_imgAnyone who thinks of EMC in terms of our storage portfolio won’t be surprised to find out that we typically have about 1,000 storage conversations every quarter through our WW Executive Briefing Center program.But it might surprise you to hear that we are also having about 1,000 customer conversations every quarter on various aspects of private cloud, ITaaS, and overall IT Transformation.And these discussions often get the highest ratings we’ve seen in terms of quality and impact.But we almost always end up with a question rather than an answer: “What are our next steps to help us accelerate our transformation?”And –Is our IT Transformation program ahead or behind the competition?How are we doing against our best-in-class competition?What are the top priorities that will accelerate our progress?It seems the #1 thing mid-size and large enterprises are most interested in is, “How are we doing relative to everyone else?”  It’s human nature—wanting to be better than the other guy. But it’s also driven by the desire to gain a competitive advantage by making IT more relevant to the business.To get to the answers, EMC has an emerging “best practice” that we’ve been sharing with customers for the past several months. It’s a different kind of Executive Briefing that we run either at your site or ours: a half-day working session we’re calling the IT Transformation Workshop. You can learn more about it here.The purpose of the (free) workshop is to share our experiences helping other customers transform their IT models in an effort to help more enterprise IT organizations prioritize their own IT initiatives and accelerate their transformations. It provides a structured review of your readiness to transform at the infrastructure, application, operation, and IT Service Strategy level. The key is in assessing where you are today versus where you want to be, and then comparing that to industry peer benchmarks based on data from about 1,000 customers that we’ve collected across a variety of industries.Here’s how it works:First, prior to the workshop, there’s a simple survey designed to capture your organization’s current level of readiness for delivering IT as a Service along the dimensions of service strategy, infrastructure, applications, and operations. From here, we’ll prepare a benchmark report that shows your current state of readiness against your own target state, as well as industry averages and best-in-class peer groups.Next, during the workshop itself, we’ll use the benchmark results to facilitate an interactive discussion, and then present findings and recommendations.Finally, after the workshop, we’ll generate a report that includes the benchmark data, along with results of the workshop prioritization and recommendations for next steps.Based on some of the workshops we’ve already done, the topic areas will span a fairly broad range, including strategic areas such as:Establishing service-based costing to provide financial transparencyAnalyzing the impact of converged infrastructure on Capex and OpexSegmenting end users to determine best targets for desktop virtualizationTraining developers in modern application development processes and toolsIntegrating management tools with the virtualized environment for greater automationConducting a skills audit to drive career path decisionsThese are just a few recent priorities that we’ve surfaced during workshop sessions. The net result for customers is an action plan with specific recommendations to help make IT more relevant to the business. If you’re interested in learning more—share your comments below and let me know!last_img read more

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Deal Registration from Anywhere, at Any Time with the Dell EMC Partner App

first_imgYou’ve just had a great customer meeting and there’s a major opportunity coming down the pipeline. You want to register the deal right away, but you still have three more client calls to make before returning to the office. You know that if you don’t lock in the opportunity, you could lose out on potential discounts and a preferred partner status…Enter the Dell EMC Partner app, which makes it easy for you to register deals on the go, from almost anywhere and at any time.This intuitive app lets you register a deal, check a deal’s status (won, lost, cancelled) and retrieve supplementary deal status information. With the Dell EMC Partner app, you’ll know immediately the number of days until a deal expires or the stage of active deals (e.g. “qualified 30%”). In addition, the Dell EMC Partner app enables you to be more productive—giving you more time with clients and reducing the amount of time you spend on administrative tasks.Newly Launched The just-launched Dell EMC Partner app (which replaces the Dell PartnerDirect App) makes it easier to register deals on the go. The app will initially be available in 14 countries including USA, Canada, Brazil, Mexico, Australia, UK, Germany, France, India, Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Korea, and Japan, The release of this app includes an upgraded authentication method. Simply use your Partner Portal login to access the app—and all of your deals.Some of the features of the Dell EMC Partner app include:Easy Deal Registration – Register a deal with Dell EMC faster. Simply create a deal, add products and submit—all with just a few clicks.Check Deal Status – Monitor the status of your deals right from the app; and receive alerts when a deal is about to expire.Save Draft Deals – The app enables you to create a deal draft and then submit to Dell EMC only when you are ready. Within the app, you can take notes, enter deal info, add products and save as a draft.Download the Dell EMC Partner App TodayThe Dell EMC Partner app is available for iOS, Android and Windows smartphones, as well as for Apple iPad.Download the updated Dell EMC Partner app User GuideEnglishJapaneseKoreanStart saving time. Use the Dell EMC Partner app to register your deals from almost anywhere, at any time.last_img read more

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Tales of Transformations: New Belgium Races to Win

first_imgWhat do you think about when you see a huge wooden keg full of tasty craft beer? A nice evening on the porch with friends? Well, Travis Morrison, IT Director, and Erin Williams, Sr. Systems Engineer, from New Belgium Brewery, see access and data points, laden with sensors, providing them what they need to know to keep their production line running smoothly.As the 4th largest craft brewer in the US, New Belgium relies on technology as a crucial component of operations. To transform their IT infrastructure, they partnered with Dell EMC and VMware to adopt a hyperconverged solution.Learn how Travis and Erin are enabling New Belgium’s employees to use data to make better business decisions (and even tastier beer). Here is their Tale of Transformation:While machines are crunching the numbers, people get to taste new craft beers, and New Belgium serves happy customers. It’s a win-win-win situation for all.Are you ready to transform your IT? Then learn how Dell Technologies can help you here.last_img read more

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Fire at Romanian hospital treating virus patients kills 5

first_imgBUCHAREST, Romania (AP) — Authorities in Romania say a fire at a key hospital in Bucharest that also treats COVID-19 patients has killed at least five people. The fire broke out early on Friday on the ground floor of the hospital. The blaze forced the evacuation of more than 100 people. An unspecified number of people have been injured before firefighters put out the fire, according to Romanian emergency services. Hours later, charred balconies could be seen at the Matei Bals hospital where health authorities organized the start of the anti-virus vaccination in Romania. The Balkan country of some 19 million people so far has reported more than 700,000 cases and 18,000 deaths.last_img read more

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Judge orders US officials to weigh coal mine’s climate costs

first_imgBILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A judge says U.S. officials downplayed climate change impacts and other environmental costs from the expansion of a massive coal mine near the Montana-Wyoming border. The judge ruled Wednesday that under former President Donald Trump, officials played up the economic benefits of the Spring Creek Mine expansion but failed to consider the society-wide impacts of climate change. Spring Creek is Montana’s largest coal mine. A representative of Navajo Transitional Energy Company, which owns the mine, said federal officials already met their obligations to review the project. The U.S. Office of Surface Mining was not commenting on the case.last_img read more

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Calls grow for US to rely on rapid tests to fight pandemic

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — With President Joe Biden vowing to get younger students back to the classroom by spring, some experts want the U.S. to refocus its COVID-19 testing system less on medical precision than on mass screening that they believe could save hundreds of thousands of lives. As vaccinations slowly ramp up, they say turning to millions more rapid tests that are cheaper and faster but technically less accurate than the predominant genetic tests may improve the chances of identifying sick people during the early days of infection, when they are most contagious. The case for widescale rapid testing is getting a boost from universities and school systems that have used the approach to stay open through the latest waves of the pandemic.last_img read more

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Community remembers fifth-year student

first_imgXavier Murphy, a fifth-year student and former resident of Zahm Hall, died Tuesday after a short battle with cancer. He was 22. Zahm Rector Corry Colonna said he and Murphy both joined Zahm in 2007 and got to know each other well during Murphy’s four years in the dorm. “He had an amazing energy about him, always so positive. He greeted everyone with a big smile,” Colonna said. “He was soft-spoken but confident and always respectful.  He had a sensitivity about him that attracted others to him.” Murphy was diagnosed with leukemia exactly one month before he died. He developed pneumonia over the weekend. Murphy, who is from Anderson, Ind., graduated with a degree in political science with the class of 2011, but was on campus this semester to finish one class and intern with the football team. “It is so very hard to imagine that energetic person is now passed,” Colonna said. “As a person of such energy, of good faith, and kindness will be how we remember him.” Murphy’s mother, Marcia Murphy, said her son was a quiet, private person, but the time since his diagnosis allowed her to see a different side of him. “He did begin to open up more and share and tell us things like he never would,” she said. “That very first day, I’ll never forget how he said, ‘I’m just so scared.’ That was so un-Xavier to open up that way.” But throughout his battle with cancer, his mother said Murphy rarely complained. Instead, during one of his most painful days, Marcia said Murphy comforted her when she cried. “It’s really weird because he got this big smile, and he did have a beautiful smile, and said, ‘Why are you crying, mom?’” Marcia said. “And I said, ‘Because it is so hard to watch you suffer.’ He took my head in his hands and said, ‘It’s okay, I’m going to be okay.’ “He didn’t fight it. He wasn’t afraid. He comforted me in his suffering.” Murphy’s father, David, also remembers Murphy’s ability to comfort those around him. “He was a gentleman in the sense that he didn’t want people around him to feel badly about themselves [or] to feel sad,” David said. “He was a lovely guy who is going to leave such a huge impact on all of us.” His parents also said Murphy embraced God during his last few weeks, and asked for confession before he died. David said Murphy loved Notre Dame and his time living in Zahm. “He loved the family he found at Notre Dame,” David said. “He loved Zahm. He loved that place and those boys were his brothers … They have been so loving and supportive, and it has meant a lot to our family.” Murphy’s younger brother, Julian, also attends the University. Zahm celebrated a Mass in honor of Murphy on Tuesday in the dorm’s chapel, followed by a walk to the Grotto. Over 150 students processed into the Grotto with candles, and many members of the crowd raised their arms in an “X” above their heads to honor Murphy. Murphy served as one of the three senior football managers last year and was interning with the football team this year. Head Football Equipment Manager Ryan Grooms called Murphy trustworthy and loyal. “Immediately, he’s one of those kids you kind of fall in love with,” he said. “He had one of those attitudes and personalities that just kind of lights up the rooms and brings happiness to everybody around you.” University President Fr. John Jenkins said in a statement Murphy will be missed by the Notre Dame community. “Our prayers and condolences go out to Xavier’s family and friends,” Jenkins said. “By all accounts he was an exceptional and greatly loved young man who will be deeply missed.” Prior to Murphy’s passing, Zahm had planned events to support Murphy and raise awareness for cancer patients. Colonna said he hopes to continue with the events. He said Zahm hopes to hold a “Raise an X for X” campaign during the Notre Dame vs. Navy football game Oct. 29, which would have been Murphy’s 23rd birthday. However, Colonna said he wants to get permission from the Murphy family before moving forward with the event. The campaign would ask the student body to stand and make an “X” with their arms over their heads, mimicking the symbol residents of Zahm traditionally make during the Celtic chant. “X isn’t just for Xavier, it is for us, but it can be a variable for anyone who is fighting cancer,” Colonna said. Zahm would also sell red T-shirts and bandanas to raise money and awareness for those battling cancer. As part of his leukemia treatment, Murphy needed to receive frequent blood transfusions. Colonna said Zahm will hold a blood drive Nov. 7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the LaFortune Ballroom. A funeral Mass will be celebrated for Murphy on Saturday at 11 a.m. The location is not set yet, but will be in one of two churches near Murphy’s hometown. Douglas Farmer and Megan Doyle contributed to this report.last_img read more

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Students abroad in Rome celebrate new pope

first_imgThe eyes of the world turned to the Vatican to watch the white smoke billow out from the Sistine Chapel on Wednesday, but Notre Dame students studying abroad in Europe were able to stand in St. Peter’s square below and witness the announcement of the new pope firsthand. A report from the Associated Press said the smoke signal came around 8 p.m. local time or 2 p.m. EST. Approximately an hour later, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, archbishop of Buenos Aires, stepped onto the balcony above the crowd and greeted them as the new pope, adopting the name Francis.  Junior Megan Leicht, an architecture student abroad in Rome, said she and her classmates immediately ran to St. Peter’s square upon hearing about the white smoke, joining the tens of thousands of people gathered there. “We all sprinted down the street, dodging people and umbrellas and honking cars and speeding vespas… while trying not to slip on the cobblestone streets and travertine curbs,” Leicht said. “We finally made it and snuck our way as close to the front as possible, just like everyone else. “The suspense continued as we waited for an hour to see the window open for the mystery cardinal. When he finally came out, everyone was so happy to see him we all began clapping and cheering at the first words of his speech.” Another architecture student in Rome, junior Patrick Riordon, also sprinted more than two kilometers from his classroom to the square at the news of the white smoke. “I threw all shame to the wind, grabbed my camera and ran down Corso Vittorio Emanuele, which leads almost straight from our building to the Vatican,” Riordon said. “I grabbed my rosary out of my pocket and started to pray, but the excitement of the crowd and my friends around me got to be too much. We were speculating about who would be chosen and what name he would take.” Riordon said he was surrounded by flags of all nations and people representing every race, and the entire square was ringing with cheers and chants in all languages. The news was not understood immediately because of the noise and chaos, he said, but once the message was translated and received by all, cheers went up for “Francisco Primo.” “When he finally came out on to the balcony, the look on his face was grave, obviously trying to take in everything that was happening,” Riordon said. “His words were confident and the focus of everything he said was prayer. “The entire congregation joined him in praying the Our Father, Hail Mary and Glory Be in Italian, and he closed by saying ‘good night and rest well,’” he said. “I think his humility and austere lifestyle are good indicators that he will be an exemplary leader and inspire the world.” Molly Carmona, another junior architecture major, said the evening was “an amazing experience that is irreplaceable.” “No other event in the world would have the driving force to gather hundreds of thousands of people from all different locations and cultures together in one square in a matter of 30 minutes,” Carmona said. “I feel blessed that I had the opportunity to witness history being made in the Catholic Church.” Junior Kelsie Corriston, a participant in the Rome program, made two trips to the Vatican on Wednesday, one to see the black smoke after the morning vote and another for the celebratory moment in the evening. She said there was a “sense of impending history” in the square, and the opportunity to witness it with fellow members of the Notre Dame community was “amazing.” “We cracked open some champagne we had brought for the occasion, toasted to the new pope’s health and waited for the announcement about the identity of the new pope,” Corriston said. “It was pouring rain, cold and pure chaos, but we had an amazing time … we waited and waited, just taking in the amazing, glorious scene. “We broke out our ‘Conclave Like a Champion Today’ banner, [and] the best part was waiting for the announcement, because curtains kept moving on the second floor of St. Peter’s. … [Finally], the crowd erupted into cheers of ‘Francesco, Viva Francesco.” Maria Kosse, a junior in Notre Dame’s London program, made the trip from England to witness the conclave in action. She said “the entire square erupted” at the unexpected sight of white smoke.      “We got to St. Peter’s square around 5 p.m., and stood in the pouring rain for two hours until we saw the smoke,” Kosse said. “Everyone was hugging and cheering ‘Viva Il Papa’… The electricity in the crowd was tangible. “When he came onto the balcony my entire body had chills, and when he addressed the crowd it was silent, all of the thousands of people in unity praying with him. And then the rain stopped right when he came out.” Bergoglio is the first non-European pope elected in the modern era, and junior Nathalia Conte Silvestre, a native of Sao Paolo, Brazil, who is studying in Bologna, Italy, said she believes the historic selection represents “a new phase” in Church history. “I’m really happy to see the Catholic Church branching out and picking someone from a part of the world that is so faithful and that adds so much to the Church,” Silvestre said. “Personally, I’m not Catholic, but his benediction, and especially his humble request for prayers before he himself could offer his blessing, makes me very glad to see the Catholic Church is in great hands.” Junior Claire Spears, abroad this semester through the Rome program, said the moment when Bergoglio stepped out from behind the curtain in the Vatican was “indescribable.” “Being in Rome [during the] conclave, seeing the white smoke and receiving Pope Francis’ first benediction are experiences that can’t be paralleled,” Spears said. “I will remember this night for the rest of my life as one of the best things I’ve been a part of. As a Catholic, this is something that I cannot forget.”last_img read more

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Professor reflects on Chavez’s death

first_imgThe death of Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez on Tuesday leaves a number of questions for the South American nation, which now adds a presidential election to the list of complex challenges it already faces. Professor Michael Coppedge, a political science professor specializing in Latin-American politics and global democratization, said the future of the regime – at least in the short term – will be determined by Interim President and Chavez’s chosen successor, Nicolas Maduro. “A lot of it depends on what Maduro will do now that he’s not in Chavez’s shadow, because he’s been very loyal to Chavez and has hidden his own tendencies to demonstrate absolute loyalty,” Coppedge said. “Now that he doesn’t have to do that, we’ll see what kind of person he is. I expect he’s not a liberal democrat, but whether he’ll be more open [to opposition] … remains to be seen.” Coppedge said Maduro’s initial statements after the president’s death suggest he intends to keep a short leash on opposition, at least in the weeks leading up to the election. “There was a subtext that the opposition better behave itself, that this is not a time to cheer or call for radical change, it’s a time to remember our fallen leader,” Coppedge said. “I think there’s a fear the opposition will try to capitalize on the moment.” The Venezuelan government announced an election will be called within 30 days, and Coppedge said he believes Maduro, the candidate for Chavez’s socialist party, will likely be the winner. “If I were to place a bet right now, I’d say Maduro will probably win, in part with the election coming so close after the death, he’ll get the vote,” Coppedge said. “A lot of Chavistas are out to prove their movement will not fall apart. … I think they’ll be motivated to campaign hard and win.” While Maduro is the likely victor, Coppedge believes the opposition could have a substantial presence in the election. “There are a lot of things for people to be unhappy about, and without Chavez to hold his group together, some of these complaints may lead to divisions,” he said. “Purchasing power has been declining, public services have been declining. … People are not happy with the extremely high crime rate.” Although the opposition stands to benefit from economic conditions, its most prominent leader does not appear to be mounting a power grab. “The opposition will probably be behind Henrique Capriles Radonski, but he has exercised some calming leadership,” Coppedge said. “He hasn’t been a polarizing leader and after Chavez’s death he expressed solidarity with Chavez’s family.” While much is uncertain for the political future of Venezuela, Coppedge said the change in leadership could present new opportunities for the country’s relationship with the United States, which was strained under the Chavez regime. “The Obama administration can act as though this can be a new opportunity to do things differently,” he said. “Obama’s statement was expressing hope for better democracy and stability in Venezuela, so I think the [United States] is going to be happy to talk and send out feelers to see whether relations can be better.” The supply of oil from Venezuela to the United States is unlikely to be disrupted during the transition, Coppedge said. “Venezuela is not in a good economic situation,” he said. “It can’t afford to stop selling oil to the [United States]. It makes economic sense to sell to us because we’re so close and have established relationships.” If Maduro wins the election, Coppedge said he is doubtful relations will improve. “I think it depends on whether Maduro, or whoever the president [will be], is going to use the same tactics as Chavez, which is to demonize the [United States] to build support at home,” he said. “I think Maduro is cut from that mold.”last_img read more

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