Grateful Dead Played Their Final Show At The Fillmore East On This Day In 1971 [Listen]

first_img48 glorious years ago today, the Grateful Dead took the stage at New York City’s Fillmore East for the final time.The Dead were no strangers to creating magical moments at the Fillmore East, which at that time was being booked and operated by Bill Graham. Just two nights prior on April 27th, the Dead welcomed members of The Beach Boys to the stage to help play on a mix of songs during the second set. On this night, the Dead needed no special guests to get the intimate venue rocking with two sets of music filled with songs from their then-new studio albums, 1970’s Workingman’s Dead and American Beauty.The band started their lengthy performance with high-energy renditions of “Truckin’” and “Bertha”, followed by “It Hurts Me Too”. The first set would go on to be filled with early-Dead live favorites, including “Cumberland Blues”, “Me and My Uncle”, a 12-minute “Bird Song”, “Playing In The Band”, and “Casey Jones”. The highlight of the first set was the band’s nearly eight-minute performance of “Ripple”.The second half of the show was filled with just as many fan-favorites from the band’s live catalog, including “Morning Dew”, “Sugar Magnolia”, and a cover of “I Second That Emotion”, which they’d played during a handful of shows in April of that year. Other songs that made it into the second half of the show included “Alligator”, “Cold Rain And Snow”, “China Cat Sunflower” into “I Know You Rider”, “Greatest Story Ever Told” (a Bob Weir solo tune which would appear on his debut studio album the following year), and the band’s cover of Chuck Berry‘s “Johnny B. Goode”. The three-song encore consisted of “Uncle John’s Band”, finally closing with “And We Bid You Goodnight”.Fans can relive the band’s 1971 performance via the audio player below. If fans listen closely, they’ll hear Bill Graham making a few surprise trips to the microphone throughout the show.Grateful Dead – The Fillmore East – 4/29/1971[Audio: Jonathan Aizen]Some of the songs recorded throughout the night were included on the band’s 2000 compilation, Ladies and Gentlemen… the Grateful Dead, which featured a mix of recordings captured during the band’s final Filmore East run on April 25th-29th, 1971.Setlist: Grateful Dead | The Fillmore East | New York, NY | 4/29/71Set One: Truckin’, Bertha, It Hurts Me Too (Traditional cover), Cumberland Blues > Me and My Uncle (The Mamas and the Papas cover), Bird Song, Playing In The Band, Loser, Dark Hollow (Bill Browning cover), Hard To Handle, Ripple, Me And Bobby McGee, Casey JonesSet Two: Morning Dew (Bonnie Dobson cover), New Minglewood Blues (Noah Lewis cover), Sugar Magnolia, Black Peter, Beat It On Down The Line (Jesse Fuller cover), I Second That Emotion (The Miracles cover), Alligator > Drums > Alligator > Goin’ Down The Road Feeling Bad (Traditional cover) > Cold Rain And Snow (Traditional cover) > China Cat Sunflower > I Know You Rider (Traditional cover), Greatest Story Ever Told > Johnny B. Goode (Chuck Berry cover)Encore: Uncle John’s Band, In The Midnight Hour (Wilson Pickett cover), And We Bid You Good Night (Traditional cover)last_img read more

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The Internet Proves Keanu Reeves Is Effortlessly Cool Regardless Of Background Music [Videos]

first_imgIf there’s anyone currently dominating the conversation in Hollywood at the moment, it’s Keanu Reeves, the Canadian-American actor known for starring roles in hit film franchises like Bill & Ted, The Matrix, and more recently, John Wick. The arrival of John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum in theaters earlier this month certainly helped to further cement Reeves’ status as one of the industry’s leading actors. It’s the actor’s tech-friendly fanbase, however, which has taken to the Internet to prove Keanu is more than capable of looking effortlessly smooth (we’re talking Fonzie-level cool here) while walking to literally any song in slow motion.Related: Bill & Ted 3 Is Officially Coming Next Summer, Keanu Reeves & Alex Winter ConfirmA new Twitter account was created over the weekend in sole dedication to Keanu Reeves walking in slow motion to a mix of songs, proving that some folks are simply cooler than the rest of us, even on their worst days. Some of the songs chosen to accompany over a dozen slo-mo videos of Reeves shared to the account throughout the weekend include classic hits like Eddie Money‘s “Take Me Home Tonight”, Berlin‘s “Take My Breath Away”, and Huey Lewis and The News‘ “Power Of Love”, in addition to more contemporary tunes from Logic, Nicki Minaj, Billie Elish, and Tame Impala.Experience Keanu in all of his coolness below.everybody wants to rule the world – tears for fears pic.twitter.com/y62b2LNd5Z— keanu reeves walking to music (@keanuwtm) May 31, 2019 alphaville – forever young pic.twitter.com/7IMaepNroJ— keanu reeves walking to music (@keanuwtm) May 31, 2019 (i’ve had) the time of my life – bill medley and jennifer warnes pic.twitter.com/b3Avh1P4Rl— keanu reeves walking to music (@keanuwtm) May 31, 2019 hypnotize -notorious BIG (request by @cosmiccaptains) pic.twitter.com/cCkFG9pvZJ— keanu reeves walking to music (@keanuwtm) May 31, 2019 the less i know the better – tame impala (request by @IzaMuniz1998) pic.twitter.com/tfXjT8pqIZ— keanu reeves walking to music (@keanuwtm) May 31, 2019Head to Twitter to waste the next 20 minutes of your life watching all the different Keanu combos.last_img read more

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Schools may flunk testing

first_imgOne of the nation’s leading educational authorities reiterated Tuesday (April 6) her often-reported warning that American public schools are in peril — perhaps more than ever.What was unusual, however, about Diane Ravitch’s presentation at the Askwith Forum of the Harvard Graduate School of Education was her approach: What she once championed to save the system is now, she contends, leading to its demise.“The passion for test-based accountability has turned into a monstrous obsession with data that threatens the quality of education,” said Ravitch, an education historian who served in the first Bush administration’s Education Department.“I’m not actually opposed to testing. I believe testing can be very valuable when testing is used for informational and diagnostic purposes,” she said. “What I am opposed to is misuse of testing for accountability purposes.”She singled out “the naïve belief that test scores are infallible and certain.” Rather, “They should be used with caution.”“I’m not opposed to choice [in selecting to attend a charter school]. I think everyone should have choices. But I oppose choice when it is used — as it has been in some places — as a conscious strategy to undermine public education.”Once a vocal proponent of standardized testing and charter schools, Ravitch often clashed with progressives. But in her 20th book, “The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education,” she decried the mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB); indeed, she suggested that an alternative book title could be “Lies Our Policymakers Tell Us About School Reform.”Ravitch insisted she has not “done a 180” degree turn in her thinking. Rather, she said, she always has pushed for all children to have a quality education. “I’ve long been a critic of the rising tide of mediocrity,” she said. “I hoped, perhaps foolishly, that accountability and choice would help us reach [those ends]. And I think now I was wrong.”Schools and teachers are being punished for failing to reach impossible standards, so schools are “gaming” test results to improve scores, she said. Using 1998 to 2009 data that examines the skills of children who grew up under the No Child strictures, “there is not one iota of improvement,” she said.She compared using test scores to evaluate schools to judging a baseball player by a single at-bat, saying scores should only be only one element in evaluating a school. “Even Babe Ruth struck out more than he homered,” she said.Charter schools, once heralded as an alternative to regular public schools, do not get better results, she said. Moreover, they represent only 1.5 million out of 50 million public school students. The focus should be on the majority, she said.Ravitch slammed President Barack Obama for supporting punitive action against schools that fall short of standards. That, she said, encourages schools to recruit better students to raise scores, rather than help those most in need. She saved her harshest critiques for Congress, accusing lawmakers of knowingly passing impossible and unproven standards. “It is unethical for Congress to mandate remedies that are impossible to achieve,” she said.Ravitch’s new approach has plenty of skeptics and critics; two of them participated in Tuesday’s forum.Martin West, assistant professor of education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, hammered both Ravitch’s research and her conclusions, accusing her of a lawyerlike habit of choosing only those facts that support her case and ignoring those that don’t. Ravitch’s book, he said, presents “no studies showing choice destroys education.”Moreover, Ravitch “ignores the failings of the system that [reforms] were intended to improve,” West said.Daniel Koretz, Henry Lee Shattuck Professor of Education, addressed Ravitch by wondering, in effect, where she was when the act was being formulated.“We didn’t have to wait for NCLB [to pass] to know these policies are impossible,” he said.Still, he agreed with Ravitch that education policymakers “charge along blissfully, unaware of evidence.”last_img read more

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HAA announces 2010 Board of Overseers election results

first_imgThe president of the Harvard Alumni Association today (May 27) announced the results of the annual election of new members of the Harvard Board of Overseers. The results were released at the annual meeting of the association following the University’s 359th Commencement. The five newly elected Overseers follow:Cheryl Dorsey (New York City) is the president of Echoing Green, a global venture fund that supports emerging innovators seeking to bring about positive social change. She is a graduate of Harvard College (A.B.’85), Harvard Medical School (M.D. ’92), and the Kennedy School of Government (M.P.P. ’92).Walter Isaacson (Washington, D.C.), former editor of Time magazine and past chairman of CNN, is the CEO of the Aspen Institute and the author of several books, including biographies of Albert Einstein and Benjamin Franklin. After graduating from Harvard College in 1974, he was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford (M.A ’76).Nicholas D. Kristof (New York City), a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, is a columnist and former international correspondent for The New York Times. He graduated from Harvard College in 1981 and studied law at Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar (M.A. ’88).Karen Nelson Moore (Cleveland) is a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. She previously served on the faculty of Case Western Reserve Law School. She received two degrees from Harvard, an A.B. in 1970 and J.D. in 1973, and is a past vice president of the Harvard Alumni Association.Diana Nelson (San Francisco), an advocate for education reform and a trustee of the World Childhood Foundation, is director of the Carlson Companies, which operates hotel, travel, and restaurant enterprises. She is a former chair of the Harvard College Fund. She holds degrees from Harvard (A.B. ’84) and Northwestern (M.B.A. ’89).The five new Overseers were each elected for six-year terms. They were chosen from a slate of eight candidates, who were nominated by a Harvard Alumni Association committee according to the election rules. Harvard degree holders cast 31,945 ballots in the election.The primary function of the Board of Overseers is to encourage the University to maintain the highest attainable standards as a place of learning. Drawing on the diverse experience and expertise of its members, the board exerts broad influence over the University’s strategic directions, provides essential counsel to the University’s leadership on priorities and plans, has the power of consent to certain actions such as the election of Corporation members, and directs the visitation process by which a broad array of Harvard Schools and departments are periodically reviewed.last_img read more

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Copyright scholar Kaplan dies

first_imgBenjamin Kaplan, the Royall Professor of Law Emeritus at Harvard Law School (HLS) and a former justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, died on Aug. 18. He was 99 years old.A pre-eminent copyright scholar, Kaplan co-wrote the first casebook on copyright, with Yale Law School professor Ralph Brown, LL.B. ’57, in 1960. His 1967 seminal text, “An Unhurried View of Copyright,” grew out of a series of copyright lectures he delivered at Columbia University as part of the James S. Carpentier Lectures series. Kaplan served on the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court from 1972 to 1981 and later on the Massachusetts Appeals Court.To read the full obituary, visit the HLS website.last_img read more

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Health care rationed in U.S., HSPH ethicist says

first_imgDaniel Wikler, Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Population Ethics and professor of ethics and population health, was interviewed Dec. 17, 2010, on Public Radio International’s “The World,” about health care rationing. The interview was part of a week-long series, “Rationing Health,” which looked at the issue in the United States, South Africa, United Kingdom, Zambia and India. Wikler, who has served as an ethicist with the World Health Organization and has been involved in international efforts to ensure equitable health rationing, also led an online discussion on the topic with Sheri Fink, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and physician.Rationing is the shortfall between what a health system provides for its citizens and what it could provide if the money were used more efficiently and fairly, Wikler told “The World.” In the U.S., there’s “implicit rationing” that’s often not recognized because the people subjected to it “don’t have much of a voice,” he said.“The number of people who die because they don’t have health insurance or they have inadequate health insurance is staggering,” Wikler said. Many lacking coverage will forgo a lifesaving treatment or a preventive service or go to a community center or emergency room where they cue up and are likely turned away, he said. Later they get sick and end up in the hospital where they may die because, by then, they’re “just too sick,” he said.Most people think of health rationing as “God committees that say ‘yes’ to this patient and ‘no’ to that patient when actually those committees are quite rare,” Wikler said. “But we should be asking if people are getting the care they need … If the answer is no, then there’s rationing,” he said. “It’s just not the death squad rationing that is booted about in the political debates but it’s rationing.”last_img read more

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Venkatesh “Venky” Narayanamurti appointed NAE foreign secretary

first_imgThe National Academy of Engineering has elected a new foreign secretary and four members to its governing Council. All terms begin July 1, 2011.Elected to a four-year term as foreign secretary is Venkatesh “Venky” Narayanamurti, Benjamin Peirce Professor of Technology and Public Policy at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and director of the science, technology, and public policy program at Harvard Kennedy School.He succeeds George Bugliarello, president emeritus and institute professor at Polytechnic Institute of New York University, Brooklyn, N.Y., who passed away in February.  Bugliarello would have completed two consecutive terms as foreign secretary on June 30, 2011.Narayanamurti came to Harvard in 1998 to serve as dean of the then Harvard Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He led the transition of the division into the new School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and stepped down as dean in 2008.He is credited with developing the field of phonon optics: the manipulation of monoenergetic acoustic beams at terahertz frequencies and is currently active in the field of semiconductor nanostructures.Narayanamurti has served on numerous national and international advisory committees and is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society; the American Association for the Advancement of Science; the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers; and the Indian Academy of Sciences.He has served on numerous advisory boards of the federal government, professional societies, national laboratories, and industry. In addition to serving in administrative and research roles, Narayanamurti lectures widely on solid state, computer and communication technologies, and on the management of Science, Technology and Public Policy.last_img read more

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Winning across the pond

first_imgHENLEY-ON-THAMES, England — Four from Harvard’s heavyweight crew team defeated Oxford Brookes University to win the Prince Albert Challenge Cup at the Henley Royal Regatta on Sunday (July 3) on the River Thames. The winning oarsmen were Peter Scholle, Justin Mundt, Benjamin French, and JP Hogan. The boat was coxed by David Fuller.For the second straight day, the Crimson four trailed through the Barrier and Fawley splits but came from behind to win. This time, Harvard came back and won by a wider margin of 1.75 lengths. Its time of 6:58 was just one second off its event-record mark from Saturday. Each of its splits was one second behind its Saturday pace as well.The win concluded another successful Henley trip for Harvard. The Crimson set event records in both the Temple Challenge Cup and Prince Albert Challenge Cup and reached the semifinals in both the Temple and Ladies’ Challenge Plate events.“I’m really proud of the way all of our crews raced over there,” said Harry Parker, the Thomas Bolles Head Coach for Harvard Men’s Crew. “I thought they did a terrific job. They’ve added another page to Harvard crew’s very strong legacy of success at Henley.”Read the full story.last_img read more

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Faust talks technology and higher education at Facebook

first_imgSeveral months after “The Social Network” pushed Facebook’s Harvard origins into the national spotlight, Harvard President Drew Faust visited the company’s headquarters in California to discuss how social networking could and should shape the future of higher education.Faust spoke at Facebook’s Palo Alto campus on June 16 at an event hosted by Elliot Schrage ’81, J.D. ’86, M.P.P. ’86, Facebook’s vice president of global communications, marketing, and public policy. In a candid dialogue with the company’s staff and interns — many of them Harvard alumni or current students — Faust fielded questions on an array of topics, from the state of public schools to the “Harvard brand” to the value of a liberal arts education.Although some critics see social networking as a distraction from the classroom, Faust argued that Facebook and the University share a similar focus in the age of information overload.“In a sense, Harvard and Facebook both serve as filters of information,” Faust said. “You filter information through social graphs. We try to teach people to be interpreters [and] critical evaluators of information, to identify how to use information.”Harvard has embraced tools of online learning, she said. Harvard students use Facebook to form study groups and learn from one another outside the classroom. Michael Sandel, Harvard’s Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Government, has become an intellectual rock star in Asia in no small part because the University broadcasts his popular Justice course for free online.“Universities don’t have walls anymore,” she said. “Knowledge is global and the way it is reaching out is global.”Social networks like Facebook play a large role in breaking down those barriers. “Virtual information and interchange builds on and encourages face-to-face” interactions, she said.What Harvard must do, Faust said, is adapt to the new culture of openness and flexibility brought about by the Internet. Gap years and international travel, both of which the University encourages, have become more popular options for undergraduates, she said. Taking a year off from Harvard — to start a company or follow an opportunity abroad, for example — no longer carries the stigma it once did.“I really believe universities should not have fixed ideas about what students should do or where they should go,” Faust said. “Instead we should give them the intellectual and other resources of advice and support and information that enable them to make the choices that are best for them and best for the world in which they’re going to live.”Still, Faust said, a liberal arts education is ideally suited for a rapidly changing world. “That’s the education that provides the foundation for being an improviser,” she said. And the door remains open for those who would like to return to finish their degrees — including Facebook’s founder, Mark Zuckerberg, who left Harvard in 2004 after his sophomore year to work on the site.“When I talked to Mark in January he said he still has his Harvard email, so he’s still on leave,” Faust joked.last_img read more

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Reshaping the Humanities

first_imgStephen GreenblattCogan University ProfessorIn recent years, humanities scholarship throughout the world has been transformed by the determined effort to interpret works of art in their historical, cultural, and anthropological contexts. This new practice came as a challenge to the entrenched method of analyzing these works in isolation, as if they had been created in a vacuum. To shift to a new perspective — one that grappled more directly with the lives of the makers and consumers — was the product of a generational insurgency, one in which I proudly played a part.But the ground for this insurgency had already been long prepared at Harvard in a remarkably innovative program created in 1906: the undergraduate concentration known as History and Literature. The concentration, Harvard’s first, was hardly meant to be intellectually radical; it was originally proposed by Professor of English Barrett Wendell as a conservative antidote to Harvard’s free-elective system.But institutional innovations often have unpredictable consequences. The pedagogical power of History and Literature lay in the touching together of two wires: canonical works of art and the documentary records of history. Art was not cordoned off from the traces of lived life, and those traces in turn could be subjected to the same interpretive pressure brought to bear on a poem or a play. The result was not only unusually lively classroom experience but also an intellectual ferment that helped inspire my generation’s literary and historical scholarship and continues to generate powerful insight.last_img read more

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