The electric field response to the growth phase and expansion phase onset of a small isolated substorm

first_imgWe capitalise on the very large field of view of the Halley HF radar to provide a comprehensive description of the electric field response to the substorm growth phase and expansion phase onset of a relatively simple isolated substorm (|AL| 12 h) of magnetic quiescence, such that prior to the start of the growth phase, the apparent latitudinal motion of the radar backscatter returns is consistent with the variation in latitude of the quiet-time auroral oval with magnetic local time. The growth phase is characterised by an increasing, superimposed equatorward motion of the equatorward edge of the radar backscatter as the auroral oval expands. Within this backscatter region, there is a poleward gradient in the Doppler spectral width, which we believe to correspond to latitudinal structure in auroral emissions and magnetospheric precipitation. During the growth phase the ionospheric convection is dominated by a relatively smooth largescale flow pattern consistent with the expanding DP2 (convection) auroral electrojets. Immediately prior to substorm onset the ionospheric convection observed by the radar in the midnight sector has a predominantly equatorward flow component. At substorm onset a dramatic change occurs and a poleward flow component prevails. The timing and location are quite remarkable. The timing of the flow change is within one minute of the dispersionless injection observed at geostationary orbit and the Pi2 magnetic signature on the ground. The location shows that this sudden change in flow is due to the effect of the upward field aligned current of the substorm current wedge imposed directly within the Halley radar field of view.last_img read more

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Scoreboard roundup — 2/2/21

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStockBy ABC News(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Tuesday’s sports events:NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONToronto 123, Orlando 108Brooklyn 124, LA Clippers 120Indiana 134, Memphis 116Portland 132, Washington 121Golden State 107, Boston 111Utah 117, Detroit 105NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUEDallas 6, Columbus 3Montreal 5, Vancouver 3Winnipeg 3, Calgary 2St. Louis 4, Arizona 3Carolina 3, Chicago 3 (OT)Colorado 2, Minnesota 1Anaheim 3, Los Angeles 1Edmonton 4, Ottawa 2Buffalo at NY Islanders (Postponed)New Jersey at Pittsburgh (Postponed)TOP-25 COLLEGE BASKETBALLBaylor 83, Texas 69Iowa 84, Michigan St. 78Mississippi 52, Tennessee 50West Virginia 76, Iowa St. 72Kansas 74, Kansas St. 51Maryland 61, Purdue 60Indiana 75, Illinois 71Wisconsin 72, Penn St. 56Florida St. at Boston College (Postponed)Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. Written by February 3, 2021 /Sports News – National Scoreboard roundup — 2/2/21center_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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Stork wins construction contract for HES Hartel tank terminal

first_imgStork will be the lead piping, mechanical and structural contractor for the 1.3 million cubic meter greenfield liquid bulk storage terminal Image: Stork has secured construction contract for HES Hartel Tank Terminal. Photo: courtesy of LEEROY Agency from Pixabay. Stork, a part of Fluor’s Diversified Services segment, was awarded a construction contract by HES Hartel Tank Terminal, a project of HES International, in the Netherlands. Stork will be the lead piping, mechanical and structural contractor for the 1.3 million cubic meter greenfield liquid bulk storage terminal at the Maasvlakte in the Port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Fluor will book the contract value in the fourth quarter of 2019.“Stork is extremely pleased to be selected by HES Hartel Tank Terminal to support the construction of the new tank terminal. We appreciate this opportunity to expand our existing relationship with HES International,” said Taco de Haan, Stork’s president. “This is the largest terminal currently being built in the Netherlands. Stork will have installed more than 75 kilometers of piping when the project is completed.”The construction execution will be supported by Stork’s services centers in the Netherlands and Stork’s prefabrication yard in Belgium. In order to provide for a fully integrated and seamless approach, Stork’s scope of work also includes the provision of temporary facilities, material handling, storage facilities, equipment and tools through Stork’s equipment and rental division EQIN (Equipment Intelligence).Stork began performing work in November 2019 with project completion expected by the end of September 2021. Source: Company Press Releaselast_img read more

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Scottish agents using ‘holiday let’ loophole to dodge tenancy legislation

first_imgHome » News » Scottish agents using ‘holiday let’ loophole to dodge tenancy legislation previous nextRegulation & LawScottish agents using ‘holiday let’ loophole to dodge tenancy legislationScottish landlords and letting agents have been targeted by campaigners who claim many are advertising traditional rental properties as ‘sham’ holiday lets.Nigel Lewis17th May 201901,260 Views Letting agents in Scotland are using a loophole to circumvent the country’s ‘indefinite’ rental contract length regulations, it has been claimed.Introduced in 2016 the law, which is similar to proposed regulations being considered for England, replaced short-hold tenancies with indefinite rental contracts in order to give tenants greater security and make it harder for landlords to evict tenants.But housing campaigners in Edinburgh, which is Scotland’s largest private rental market, say they have identified several letting agents and landlords who are advertising properties as ‘holiday flats’ in order to circumvent the rules.Living Rent, a local campaign group, says landlords are offering their properties as ‘holiday lets’ in order to avoid having to register as landlords and avoid the law on tenancy length.Holiday let loopholeIt claims the ‘holiday let’ loophole also enables letting agents to sidestep the legislation and means deposits do not have to be protected and properties are exempt from HMO licensing rules and has been holding protests outside several letting agents in the city. SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon has promised to look into the loophole.“The new, better contracts were hard won by tenants up and down Scotland, demanding better rights and better protections from eviction,” says Emma McGillivray of Living Rent.She said the group, which recently featured on Scottish TV,  is now considering taking legal action against the landlords and letting agents involved.“We welcome the Scottish Government’s consultation on holiday lets, but if they are serious about protecting tenants, they need take action now close this loophole and drastically step up regulation and ensure tenants are safe,” says Megan Bishop, the author of Living Rent’s recent report into the Scottish rental market.Nicola Sturgeon Living Rent SNP tenancies Edinburgh May 17, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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Sen. Joe Donnelly’s Office Would Not Provide Details About The Search To Fill Court…

first_imgWith U.S. District Judge Robert Miller Jr. preparing to take senior status in January, Indiana will have three judicial vacancies to fill on the federal bench. Across the country, openings in district and circuit courts are increasing and have become a growing concern in the legal community. Currently the federal judiciary has 70 vacancies with 31 considered judicial emergencies and an additional 17 openings pending, according to statistics from the U.S. Courts.Sen. Joe Donnelly’s office would not provide details about the search to fill the vacancies in Indiana but said the Indiana Democrat has been working to identify qualified candidates.“(Sen. Donnelly) is hopeful that following in the bipartisan tradition of past Hoosier Senators, including Sens. (Richard) Lugar and (Evan) Bayh, we will soon be able to advance nominees to fill these positions,” said Sarah Rothschild, communications director for Donnelly.Candidates for the openings in the federal courts are traditionally recommended to the president by the state’s senators. Donnelly had been optimistic about naming a candidate by mid-2015 but he and Republican Sen. Dan Coats have not spoken publically about the vacancies since May when Coats called for the appointment of a judicial nominating commission to help find qualified individuals to serve in the federal courts.Miller is scheduled to become a senior judge Jan. 11, 2016, the day after he marks his 30th anniversary as a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Indiana. The U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana has had a vacancy since Judge Sarah Evans Barker stepped into senior status June 30, 2014. In addition, Indiana has a vacancy to fill on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals created by theretirement of Judge John Tinder in August 2015.Although Barker is now a senior judge, she has continued to carry a full docket and expects to do so until a replacement is named. Miller is anticipating he will still handle a full load of cases as well. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Council Roundup: Ocean City Homes Attics, Grants, Appointments

first_imgConstruction earlier this year in the Ocean City Homes section at the southern end of the island.City Council on Monday (Dec. 29) approved the hiring of Jim Mallon as Ocean City’s new business administrator and agreed to a new four-year contract with police. But here are a few other agenda items that might be of interest:Attics in Ocean City Homes Neighborhood: City Council approved the second reading of an ordinance that provides relief for the only single-family neighborhood in Ocean City with a six-foot attic height limit. The measure allows attic heights of nine feet and eliminates a requirement for a pull-down stair (without changing overall building height requirements). Councilman Pete Guinosso cast the lone dissenting vote in a 6-1 decision. He said the decision would allow people to turn attics into living areas.Historic Grants: City Council voted to accept three Sandy Disaster Relief Grants for Historic Properties from the New Jersey Historic Trust. The grants are for historic buildings that were damaged in the October 2012 Superstorm Sandy, including $501,000 for the Ocean City Transportation Center (10th and Haven), $143,031 for the U.S. Life Saving Station (Fourth and Atlantic) and $230,000 for City Hall (Ninth and Asbury).Appointments: City Council reappointed Jeffrey Frost to the Zoning Board, Edmond Speitel to the Ocean City Housing Authority, and Patricia Watts, Victor Plumbo and Martin Schlembach (first term) to the Aviation Advisory Board.See complete documentation for all agenda items below.Download (PDF, 8.64MB)__________Sign up for OCNJ Daily’s free newsletter and breaking news alerts“Like” us on Facebooklast_img read more

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In my world

first_imgUmer Ashraf is an entrepreneur who owns the Glasgow-based iCafé shop chain, as well as smoothie and juice bar Paradise Bay, in Oban, ScotlandQuotes are beautiful things. They colour the canvas of conversation and often express the most complex elements of the human condition clearly and concisely. I usually quote the likes of Shakespeare, Socrates and Martin Luther King when I am discussing current affairs with friends. But recently, I found myself (in what one could justifiably call a rage) quoting Ghandi to a frightened pseudo-checkout operator while buying milk from Sainsbury’s.Let me elaborate. I have high standards when it comes to customer service. I like connecting with human beings and find great joy in brief social encounters. So I’m a great believer in the virtue of patience and normally have no problem queuing at checkouts, as often the wait is well worth it. For example, earlier in the day, I was in line at WH Smith to pay for my FT Weekend. On reaching the counter, before me was the face of a beautiful young African woman with the world’s biggest frown on her face. Her beauty was a relief given that, a quick flick through the FT while waiting meant all I’d seen for the previous five minutes were pictures of Angela Merkel, William Hague and Vince Cable! Yet her frown disheartened me. I could see she was frustrated at having to serve misanthropes all morning who neither said please nor thank you. So I made it my mission not to leave until I had cheered her up. It didn’t take long. As she handed over my receipt, I asked her to bin it for me. Pointing to the FT I said: “Unless it is really bad news, I won’t want my money back”. She lit up with a large smile. Mission accomplished. We had transformed what could have been a mere commercial transaction into a social one.Popping into Sainsbury’s on the way home, all I wanted was a bottle of milk, but as I went to pay, all the checkouts were closed during a peak period and all I could see was a swarm of frustrated customers dashing to and from malfunctioning self-service checkouts. Never before had I used one of these machines, but I was not given a choice, and everything that could have gone wrong did. It wouldn’t recognise the bar code, it wouldn’t accept my coins, it kept vomiting vile dictatorial commands, such as “remove item from this area”. I was delaying the long queue behind me, full of growling customers.With my patience tested to the limit, I let rip on the customer assistant. “Why do you have these bloody things”? I yelled! The entire supermarket froze in silence except for that dastardly machine. The trembling assistant replied: “I’m sorry sir, management make all these decisions; they think it will speed up customer service.”Instantly, I thought of Ghandi and quoted: “There is more to life than increasing its speed,” before walking out.Back at home, with no milk to enjoy a hot chocolate, I opened the FT and read this headline: “UK supermarkets to increase self-service checkouts”.”I want my money back,” I yelled out, only to remember what I’d said to the assistant at WH Smith and, in tandem, the most common platitude of all: “Be careful what you say.”last_img read more

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Jay board sets sewer rate, approves grant for fire department

first_imgJAY – The Board of Selectpersons opted to hold the town’s sewer rate steady for another year at Monday’s meeting, in addition to authorizing the use of grant funding to purchase an all-terrain vehicle for Jay Fire Rescue.The board approved a fee of $315 for minimum users, covering up to 3,200 cubic feet of water usage. Beyond 3,200 cubic feet, users will be charged .0952 cents per cubic foot used. That rate, which is effective July 1, 2020, is the same as the one currently in effect. According to figures provided to the board by Sewer Department Superintendent Mark Holt, that rate is anticipated to cover roughly 90 percent of the department’s operations and maintenance budget.The board also voted to accept $20,000 from the Stephen & Tabitha King Foundation to go toward the purchase of a side-by-side ATV for the town’s fire department. In a letter sent to the foundation as part of the grant application, the department said that the ATV would allow firefighters to respond to woods fires, ATV and snowmobile crashes and back country rescues both in Jay and when responding to mutual aid calls throughout the region.The ATV could also assist the police department or EMTs when responding to calls, the department said. The Public Works Department also occasionally uses an ATV to drag the town’s ball fields.In addition to carrying personnel and equipment, the ATV will be equipped with year-round tracks and transported on a trailer.To help cover the cost of the trailer, Police Chief Richard Caton IV supported selling the JPD’s four-wheeler and its accompanying, smaller trailer to go toward purchasing a larger version for the new side-by-side, according to information provided by Town Manager Shiloh LaFreniere.last_img read more

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The Motet Channels The Power Of Interstellar Funk On New Album, ‘Totem’ [Stream/Review]

first_imgThe future space funk is in good hands if Totem, the new album by The Motet, is any indication. The band has made some personnel changes of late, and fans have been waiting eagerly to hear what The Motet had in store for them. Noted proponents of funk with world and dance elements liberally mixed together, The Motet has built a loyal following that was hopeful their heroes would keep it real and keep it real funky. With guitarist Eric Krasno of Lettuce and Soulive producing and writing a pair of tunes for the disc, certain expectations were held, and happily exceeded. The most prominent change came at vocalist, going from Jans Ingber to Lyle Divinsky, a move that has the band sounding even more like a forgotten fountain of the funk hey-day of the late seventies than ever.Stream the album via Spotify below, and follow along with our written review of the new release!Founder Dave Watts fittingly kicks off this new era of The Motet with a twisty percussion intro to “The Truth” that sets the stage to let Divinsky show what he brings to the proceedings. Divinsky’s weapon of choice is a voice that sounds so authentic and perfect for the mood, you almost have to wonder if he was made in a laboratory. The space boogie flows on with the bouncy “Fool No More,” with a snappy bass line from Garrett Sayers that sounds an inexorable call to the dance floor for party people. Organist Joey Porter gets a chance to shine on “Know It Too Well,” as the music opens up and he has a chance to lend squeals and peals to lyric heavy sections before drenching the proceedings with lush chords. The percolating pulse of “Rippin’ Herb” shows how tight The Motet can be, as they play an intricate musical game of “follow the leader” through a winding funk maze, passing off the lead almost imperceptibly. Divinsky shows great comfort for such a short stint in the organization, as his leads on “Damn!” show. Showy use of echo laden vocals and doubling techniques that thicken his already impressive tone to a smooth pervasive presence that make the instrumental breaks a trip to an alternate dimension, sonically, within each original tune’s framework. Nothing has changed about The Motet’s love of instrumentals, and the wordless “Solar Plexus” keeps the overall cosmic groove feeling of Totem going with a touch of reggae thrown in for good measure in the forms of the majestic horn fills. Guitarist Ryan Jalbert continues to show impressive growth in his playing, with his ability to shift from slinky rhythm to full on rock star wail in an instant. The horn section of Gabe Mervine and Drew Sayers use their brass to take every song higher, adding layers of depth and reinforcing the beats and melodies with equal dexterity. Whether hanging back in a thick groove on tunes like “Danger” or getting jazz-y and expressive on songs like “Cloak And Dagger,” The Motet sounds like a finely tuned machine, ready to run perfectly in whatever gear is needed to get where they want to go.For the closing song, the instrumental “Contraband,” the choice is made to slowly take the foot off the accelerator, and to give listeners a cool down as they are slowly dispelled from the Utopian funk spell. Any worries about the future of The Motet should be instantly dispelled from the first notes of Totem. With the release of this united work and tour dates on the horizon to hone the new lineup into a true unit, it certainly looks like the best is yet to come from The Motet. But for now, Totem is a showcase for a funk band that is at the top of their game.last_img read more

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The Road To Rooster Walk: Lyle Divinsky Of The Motet Talks Songwriting

first_img“All of a sudden there’s a song – there in your hotel room playing your guitar – and you write it, and two or three years later it will come true. It keeps you on your toes.”These words, spoken by Townes Van Zandt, support a popular notion of the songwriter in American popular culture: A rambling man, on the road with a band, playing venues both squalid and splendid, creating songs from thin air with little more than a beat up guitar, bottle of booze and hotel notepad. And there’s no doubt that countless great tunes have been written in such a manner. But there’s another question worth asking: In 2017, are most songs written that way?To find out, we spoke with six songwriters who will be at the ninth annual Rooster Walk Music & Arts Festival over Memorial Day weekend (May 25-28) in Martinsville, Va. These six artists: Paul Hoffman (Greensky Bluegrass), Anders Osborne, Andrew Marlin (Mandolin Orange), Lyle Divinksy (The Motet), Marcus King, and Wood Robinson (Mipso) bring different backgrounds, hometowns, experience levels and genres to the craft of songwriting. Perhaps unsurprisingly, they write songs in different manners.Read on to learn about the unique process that Colorado-based band The Motet uses to create the songs you know and love. You can also catch Lyle with the Motet when they hit Fool’s Paradise this weekend!Editor’s Note: This is the first story in a six-part “Road to Rooster Walk” series about the craft and process of songwriting. When lead vocalist and hype-man-extraordinaire Lyle Divinsky got approached about joining The Motet a year and a half ago, his audition had little to do with stage presence or singing ability. Those were skills the band had already verified. Instead, Divinky’s tryout was largely about putting lyrics to a pair of instrumental songs the band had already demoed . . . before he’d met a single member of the group.“It was kind of a fun challenge to know that this was my audition for the band, to write for them, and to know that and to just get excited about how much fun their music was,” Divinsky said. “The Truth’ was the first song that I wrote and that one, I wrote most of it in three hours of sitting down. And then took, I think, a day or two to just kind of sit with it, make sure it was exactly what I wanted and just kind of fine tune a couple things. And then, ‘Fool No More’ was the second song that I wrote, and that one was pretty quick, as well. That one might have even been just a day.”When possible, Divinsky prefers to write from his in-home studio, where he’ll set up shop at his computer (which features basic recording software), a notepad, pen, and his phone. He’ll set the phone’s timer for three hours and then toss it across the room, “because I feel like three hours is about the amount of time that I can work productively without needing a full-on break.”When things are flowing freely, it can be a speedy process.“My favorite times are the ones where I sit down with a song, and like an hour-and-a-half later, the whole song’s written down, and I’m already recording the background harmonies to it,” he said.Like Anders Osborne, Divinsky is adamant in his goal to write something every day, even if that something isn’t a fully realized song or concept. He uses the voice recording app on his smartphone, or a small notepad that he carries in his pocket, to capture lyrical snippets or potential song ideas. These get transferred into a larger notebook or computer file, though when he heads into the studio with instrumental tracks waiting, he tries his best not to fall back on the lyrics he’s already started.“I like to go into it with a completely blank slate, because I think that gives me the chance to really interact with the song and see what can come of it,” Divinsky said. “But then if I’m having a hard time catching something, I’ll start going through hook lines, start going through lyrics that I’ve written, little poems and whatnot. You can get turned on by even just a word from one of those, and then that can send you off in the right direction.”Before joining The Motet, he wrote both lyrics and the music to go with them. But now, with a longstanding band of amazing musicians by his side, the job description has changed. And he loves it.“The melodies aren’t necessarily complete (when the song arrives to me). They’ll give me instrumentals and whatnot – drum, guitar, keys – the skeleton demo version of what they’re coming up with. And then I’ll put the song over it,” he said. “They give the foundation, and I kind of paint in the branches and the leaves and everything like that.”Divinksy is equally comfortable writing on the computer or with pen and paper. When he gets stuck on a song, he’s found that switching from computer to paper, or vice versa, can get him back on track. Thanks to his in-home studio, when he sends a potential song back to the band, it’s far more than an email with typed out verses and choruses.“Whenever I send my ideas back to the guys, it’s usually a fully realized (audio track), just so they can kind of hear it in the context that I intend it to be,” he said. “You know, sometimes it works super well, super quick.”Songwriters who influence Lyle: Bill Withers (“I think that he’s able to capture grandiose emotions in very simple words. So he’s a hero of mine for that.”) Lowell George, John Prine, Stevie Wonder.Song: “The Truth”Next Week on the Road to Rooster Walk: Greensky Bluegrasslast_img read more

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