VS14: USS Mustin Launches Two SM-2 Missiles

first_img VS14: USS Mustin Launches Two SM-2 Missiles View post tag: americas View post tag: Navy Air and sea units from the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force participated in the sinking of ex-USS Fresno (LST 1182).Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89) is currently underway near Guam as part of Valiant Shield 2014.Valiant Shield is a U.S.-only exercise integrating U.S. Navy, Air Force, Army and Marine Corps assets, offering real-world joint operational experience to develop capabilities that provide a full range of options to defend U.S. interests and those of its allies and partners.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, September 17, 2014; Image: US Navy During the military exercise Valiant Shield 2014, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89) fired two SM-2 missiles as part of a sinking exercise. View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic View post tag: USS Mustin View post tag: two Share this articlecenter_img Back to overview,Home naval-today VS14: USS Mustin Launches Two SM-2 Missiles September 17, 2014 View post tag: SM-2 View post tag: Missiles View post tag: Valiant Shiels Authorities View post tag: VS14 View post tag: launcheslast_img read more

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Transfer Nation: Sixteen students embark on first semester at Notre Dame in the spring

first_imgLast week, as most students were returning for their second semester of the 2019-2020 academic year, 16 new undergraduates were beginning their very first semester at Notre Dame, the Office of Undergraduate Admissions reported.“In the fall, the entire University is welcoming new students — new first-year students, new transfer students — we’re all thinking there are new people here,” said Erin Camilleri, the director of transfer enrollment. “In the spring, people are kind of in their zone and doing their thing. So I always think that it’s a little bit harder to transfer in the spring. It takes a student who has a really strong desire to be here.”A wide variety of students choose to matriculate spring semester. Some of these students, Camilleri said, are student-athletes who are starting their athletic training early, the semester before their freshman season begins. Others are students who were admitted for enrollment in the fall but, due to personal circumstances, chose to defer their enrollment until spring semester.A third category of spring enrollees, however, are selected from a separate pool of applicants. These students have attended a different college or university for at least three semesters, Camilleri said, and they have chosen to enroll at Notre Dame halfway through the academic year. Camilleri estimated that about 100 students apply from this third category each year. This year, only four students enrolled from that pool of applicants. The selection process, she said, is highly competitive.When looking at the applications of spring-semester transfers, the University considers how these students will handle the unique transition. First, the University must ensure that these students’ previous coursework will transfer smoothly, keeping the students on track to graduate with their credits, Camilleri said.“The further you get on [in school], the more difficult it is to align a different institution’s curriculum with our curriculum,” Camilleri said. “So we’re really looking to see [the] students get slotted in nicely.”Additionally, Camilleri said the admissions committee considers whether the students will be able to quickly immerse themselves in the Notre Dame community, making connections and friendships even though they are arriving on campus later than most students.“They need to bring a sense of adventure and excitement with them,” she said. “And it takes a student who’s willing to be flexible — [a] student who really want[s] to be here.”New students arriving in the fall begin the semester with four days of programming that’s designed to build community and adjust students to campus life. But for new students arriving in the spring, that Welcome Weekend programming is distilled into only a day and a half, Camilleri said. The spring Welcome Weekend is coordinated and overseen by other transfer students who have already been through the transition.“‘Transfer Nation,’ so to speak — the people who call themselves ‘Transfer Nation’ — they really do look out for one another,” Camilleri said.Junior Nyakeh Tuchscherer transferred after three semesters at St. John’s University, which he attended until the fall of his sophomore year before opting to transfer to Notre Dame. His decision to transfer was largely fueled by his academic interests — Notre Dame offered more resources for research and international opportunities, Tuchscherer said. But the transition — environmentally and socially — was somewhat challenging. Moving from New York City to South Bend, he was not initially prepared for the Notre Dame culture, which is more insular and homogenous than St. John’s, Tuchscherer said. Nevertheless, he’s glad he made the decision to transfer.“I have no regrets [about] transferring, even though it’s totally different and it’s not what I expected,” Tuchscherer said. “I wouldn’t have the opportunities that I’ve been getting today if it weren’t for Notre Dame, so I’m very thankful and glad to be here. That’s a privilege.”Camilleri said students who transfer tend to be highly involved, picking up extracurriculars that help them meet other students and connect with the campus community. Bringing fresh perspectives and strong school spirit, she said they add unique value to the school.“It takes a special person to be a transfer student,” Camilleri said. “I think one of the best things about them is that they have a wonderful sense of excitement for the University. I think that transfer students, as a whole, enrich the student body tremendously.”Tags: Transfer Nation, transfer students, Welcome Weekendlast_img read more

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Classes to open on August 24 – DepEd

first_imgShe added that students will either go to class physically or via online due to the enhanced community quarantine and general community quarantine implemented in different parts of the country. According to DepEd secretary Leonor Briones Briones, it was agreed upon during the consultations made that the school year will begin on Aug. 24 and will end on April 30, 2021. “Yes. Because my bill gives the President the power to adjust [the] school calendar unlike the previous law,” Sotto said on his Senate Bill No. 1438, which aims to amend Section 3 of the Republic Act No. 7977 or the Act on Lengthening of School Calendar./PN “Ang napili nating school opening date ay Aug. 24,” Briones said. “Una sa lahat, ang pinakamalaking konsiderasyon natin dito ay to protect the health and safety and well-being of learners. ‘Yun ang pinakaunang priority natin.” Briones also said that the changes will pose a huge challenge for the DepEd as new teaching methodologies before the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, including Flexible Learning Options, have been fast-tracked. Briones also ordered teachers to render service to DepEd, whether physically or virtually, from June 1 to June 30, for them to undergo capacity building for new lessons, including the DepEd Commons. MANILA – The new school year will open Aug. 24, whether it will be physically or virtually, the Department of Education (DepEd) announced Tuesday. Even with DepEd’s announcement, Senate President Vicente Sotto III said that he will still push for the bill granting authority to President Rodrigo Duterte to adjust the schedule of opening of classes. “May mga schools na handa na daw sila na magbukas ng online, public o private, ng kanilang school lessons. Marami ring through the cellphone. Nag-survey kami, puwede ding sa telebisyon at saka sa radyo,” Briones said.last_img read more

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Tyson Fury aims to end the spring of the heavyweights on a high note

first_imgAny combination of the aforementioned names in a ring together this year is what boxing supposedly needed, but instead, each fighter, guided by their respective promoters, all scattered off in different directions seemingly avoiding addressing the issue regarding who is the planet’s finest heavyweight. Wilder opted for Dominic Breazeale, his WBC mandatory, Joshua selected Jarrell Miller before a series of drug test mishaps made him plump for Andy Ruiz Jr, and for Fury it was Tom Schwarz, a boxer only aficionados of the sport have any real knowledge of. Far from ideal, but in a sport as unpredictable of boxing, chaos was just around the corner.First up to cement his claim for supremacy was Wilder and the Alabamian wasted little time in dispatching Breazeale. Comparisons were instantly made to Joshua’s beating of the American in 2016, as it took him eight rounds, Wilder completed the job in seconds. A stunning right hand was all that was required and, as is often the case in fights featuring the “Bronze Bomber,” one shot is all it takes. It might not have been a contest that audiences were desperate to lap up, but there was no doubt that Wilder left a mark on those that did choose to view it. Now the ball was in Joshua’s court.Two weeks after Wilder’s demolition of Breazeale, Joshua, making his American debut, kicked off the summer with a Madison Square Garden extravaganza against Andy Ruiz, a supposed last-minute substitute, but a fighter who’d had ample preparation. A glance to yesteryear from British supporters evoked memories of Naseem Hamed, Lennox Lewis and Ricky Hatton, and Joshua’s stateside invasion was set to outdo them all. What transpired instead will long in the mind for anyone fortunate to view it as one of boxing’s great modern upsets occurred on what was scheduled to be a night that confirmed Joshua as an international megastar. It was set to be a summer of discontent. Despite what anyone tells you, boxing’s heavyweight division was intended to stand still in 2019 after the previous year gave us hope of prosperous times. Three contrasting characters, Deontay Wilder, Anthony Joshua, and Tyson Fury, all laid claim to the magical crown based on alternative reasons, and each was within their rights to make such bold claims. Plans to eradicate the confusion didn’t even have a blueprint, but this is boxing, and disappointment is a feeling followers of the sport are accustomed to.Join DAZN and watch Andrade vs. Sulecki on June 29 Dropping Ruiz in the third stanza, most, no all, expected Joshua to complete the job soon after, but clichés about wounded animals rang true as Ruiz exposed “AJ’s” recklessness with a perfectly timed left hook that essentially sealed the fight. Joshua went down, rose on eight, but it was a punch that took so much from him and his undefeated record was in a huge heap when Ruiz sent him to canvas three more times forcing the referee to wave it off in round number seven. A fascinating trio had become an unlikely quartet and heavyweight boxing. Dismissed and ridiculed in the spring, was where it once was frequently, right at the top of the sporting world’s key discussion.Now all the attention turns to Fury as the north Englander heads to Las Vegas, a city designed for a character as engaging as the former world heavyweight champion, a man who lost his belts outside the ring. His bout with Germany’s Tom Schwarz is a million miles away from his memorable clashes with Wladimir Klitschko and Wilder, but if the last few weeks have demonstrated anything to those with a keen eye on the heavyweight division, it’s to expect the unexpected.Fury against Schwarz may not be as dynamic as Wilder’s brutal finish of Breazeale, and surely it won’t bring the sport to a grinding halt like the Ruiz/Joshua upset, but it’s a showdown that Fury has to take seriously so his high stock in his chosen craft doesn’t lose value. Heavyweight boxing has been turned upside down recently and for fighters near the top of the division, it’s time to stand up and be counted. Wilder and Joshua have had their chances, now it’s time for Fury to take his opportunity.last_img read more

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Future looks bright for local skater thanks to success Kootenay Regional Figure Skating Championships

first_imgThere were some strong results from veteren skaters as well. Charly DeFouw, 12, earned Gold in Jr. Silver Dance, Christina Champlin, 15, notched Gold for her Pre Novice short program, Courtney Shrieves, 15, placed seventh in Pre Introductory Interpretive, and Breanna Tomlin finished seventh in Introductory Interpretive.With teams travelling from across the region and officials and support services arriving from around the province, the competition was a huge logistical undertaking by the NFSC.“I can’t say enough about the community support we got- it was unbelievable,” commented NFSC President Jane Macleod, who has spent more than a year planning and organizing with the support of many local businesses.“I received so many comments on how well the event came off.”In the Star 1 category the Nelson results were: Lila Mckechnie, Gold; Leo Measures, Silver; Helene Keating, Silver; Tia Berrens, Silver; Mallory Pinske, Silver; Aurora Panko-Dool, Bronze.In Star 2 Isabella Kroker Kimber received Bronze while in Star 3 Tao measures received Silver and Angelica Ross, Bronze.In these levels skaters do not compete against each other but receive rankings from the judges of Gold, Silver or Bronze.Shaen Panko-Dool wrapped up her skating career by competing in two events, Bronze Elements and Star 4 Freeskate program finishing 8th and 9th in those events respectively.Complete Nelson skating results can be seen at neslonfigureskating.com. The region’s best young figure skaters squared off in Nelson last weekend at the Kootenay Regional Figure Skating Championships.Hosted by the Nelson Figure Skating Club (NFSC), the three-day event determined the 2013 champions across a range of categories from Elements to Pairs to the crowd- pleasing Interpretive programs.Thirteen skaters from the host club participated, giving friends and family a rare chance to see skaters compete on home ice.Considering the club has been plagued with injuries and a number of senior skaters gone from last season, coach Yoshie Measures was pleased with her club’s effort.“We have a number of young skaters in our Junior Academy program competing for the first time,” Measures said.“They are the club’s stars of tomorrow.”last_img read more

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Dance partners set for Cyclone Taylor Cup

first_imgAll the dance partners have now been confirmed for the 2014 Cyclone Taylor Cup starting Thursday in the Hertiage City at the NDCC Arena.Beaver Valley was the last team to book its ticket to the BC Hockey Junior B Final Four after the Nitehawks disposed of the Kamloops Storm in six games in the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League Final Friday in Fruitvale.The other two dance partners are the Victoria Cougars of the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League and Aldergrove Kodiaks of the Pacific Junior Hockey League.The winner of Cyclone Taylor Cup advances as the provincial champions to the Keystone Cup for the Western Canadian championships.The Abbotsford Pilots host the tournament April 17-20, featuring the top teams from B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Northern Ontario, along with the host Pilots.The Nelson Daily has a capsule look at the four teams vying for BC Junior B Hockey supremacy:Nelson Leafs — Cyclone Taylor Host TeamThe Green and White took the shortest route to the Junior B tournament.However, it’s not the way the host team wanted to advance to the four-team affair.Nelson was knocked out by Beaver Valley in the Murdoch Final in six games.The Leafs were a battered and bruised team and paid the price of not having their two goalies — Brad Rebagliati and Adam Maida — as well as a healthy leading scorer — Jamie Vlanich on the roster against the Hawks.However, after being unceremoniously eliminated during the KIJHL playoffs, the Leafs have had a month off to rest those weary bones.Leaf coach Frank Maida gave the Leafs two full weeks away from the rink before resuming training April 1.When Nelson opens the tournament Thursday at 7 p.m. against Victoria, Nelson should be ready and rested for the Cougars.Nelson will rely heavily on Vlanich and linemate Travis Wellman to power the Leafs offence. But don’t be alarmed if Nelson Minor Hockey products Carsen Willans and Linden Horswill, playing their final games for the Green and White, doesn’t continue his goal scoring in the Cyclone Taylor Tournament.On defence, the Leafs will be bolstered by the return of smooth skating Robson Cramer who sat out the final games of the Murdoch Final due to a suspension. Joining Cramer is hard-hitting captain Darnel St. Pierre, Patrick Crome, Austin Seaman and Nick Trefry.In goal, Rebagliati is slated to man the nets after recovering from injury.Nelson will be looking to win its first Junior B title since Fritz Koehle coached the Leafs to the provincial crown in 1968.The last time the Leafs played in the Cyclone Taylor Cup was in 2009 when the squad, coached by Simon Wheeldon, lost in the final to Richmond Sockeyes. Beaver Valley Nitehawks — KIJHL ChampionsBeaver Valley won its second KIJHL title in three seasons.The Hawks may have won three straight had the Castlegar Rebels not eliminated Beaver Valley in the seventh game of the Murdoch Final last season.Castlegar went on to win the 2013 KIJHL crown.dThe Hawks are loaded with talent. But the driving force of the team is the two-headed monster in Dallas Calvin and Ryan Edwards.The two Trail natives combined for 82 points in 41 games.However, if Calvin and Edwards are not scoring the Hawks can look down the line up to see Riley Brandt, Dan Holand or Braden Fuller fill the void.On defence, Fraser Stang anchors a blueline that batters and beats up opposing forwards.And in goal, all-world Brett Clark, sporting a 14-5 playoff mark with a 2.38 goals against average — and two playoff shutouts — is there to keep Beaver Valley in the game.Beaver Valley, winners of the BC title in 1997 and 2001, begins play Thursday at 3 p.m. in the NDCC Arena against PJHL chanpion, Aldergrove Kodiaks.Aldergrove Kodiaks — PJHL ChampsThe Kodiaks did the unthinkable in the Pacific Junior Hockey League Final.Trailing 3-1 to Junior B powerhouse, Richmond Sockeyes, Aldergrove rang off three straight  wins — including a 5-1 road win — to dethrone the reigning PJHL champs.Aldergrove is led by 20-year-old McHaffie twins — Spencer and Scott — who combined for 19 goals while adding 20 assists to lead the Kodiaks in the playoffs.On the blueline is rookie Jeremy Lagler who finished the PJHL playoffs tied for third in team scoring with 13 points.In goal, 20-year-old Jordan Liem backstopped Aldergrove to the amazing comeback in the final against Richmond.Victoria Cougars — VIJHL ChampionsVictoria made it look easy en route to capturing its third Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League title.The Cougs dumped Peninsula Panthers in six games to clinch the Island title.Victoria is led by Snohomish, Washington sniper Michael Fretz who led the Cougars in playoff scoring with 10 goals and 15 assists in 15 games.Alberta native Blake Roney was right behind Fretz with 12 goals and 10 assists with 19-year-old Sam McMullen also scoring a dozen goals.In goal Nathan Hargrave etched out a skinny 1.71 goals against average to lead the Cougs.Check out the Cylcone Taylor website for full schedule and ticket information.last_img read more

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ONE LUCKY SANTA ANITA FAN WINS BRAND NEW 2016 GLC COURTESY OF MERCEDES-BENZ OF ARCADIA

first_imgVEHICLE HAS RETAIL VALUE OF $42,000 ARCADIA, Calif. (July 4, 2016)–There’s an old adage among gamblers and horseplayers that if you don’t participate, you could be walking around “lucky” and not know it. Safe to say Jim Summers of Solana Beach is glad he decided to come to the races on Monday at Santa Anita, as he ended up winning a 2016 Mercedes-Benz GLC courtesy of Mercedes-Benz of Arcadia, which is part of the Rusnak Auto Group, when the Doug O’Neill-trained first time starter Dynamite Charge won the sixth race on the Independence Day card, thus making Summers the beneficiary of the Mercedes-Benz GLC giveaway staged by Santa Anita and Mercedes-Benz of Arcadia.“I’ve been playing the horses since I was 18,” said Summers, 57, of Solana Beach. “I love the people and the action. It’s just fun coming to the track and looking for horses to play.“I came up today and had a few of the dollar beers with a couple friends, we’re all San Diego guys. I’m gonna keep the car. I have to pick it up by July 30 here at Rusnak in Arcadia.”Summers, who works in the San Diego area as an actuary, qualified as a Top 10 finalist in the Mercedes-Benz giveaway contest through an online entry at santaanita.com.“This contest has really been a win-win for everyone involved and we’re very appreciative of Rusnak/Arcadia for helping to make it happen,” said Santa Anita’s Vice President of Marketing, Nate Newby. “It’s really nice to have a guy like Jim win this as well. He’s a lifelong horseplayer so it’s great to see him hit this kind of a jackpot. We just wish he lived closer to Santa Anita!”Donated by Rusnak/Arcadia, the 2016 Mercedes-Benz GLC has a retail value of $42,000.last_img read more

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Klay Thompson confident he can play in Game 1 vs. Houston

first_imgKlay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up!LOS ANGELES – Klay Thompson walked with a slight limp through the arena’s hallway.That did not stop him, though, from gutting through the Warriors’ 129-110 Game 6 win over the Los Angeles Clippers on Friday. Thompson rolled his right ankle as he drove to the basket in the third quarter, but he still stayed in the game.Oh great. Klay Thompson slightly rolls his …last_img read more

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MLB Winter Meetings: Madison Bumgarner’s market is already heating up

first_imgSAN DIEGO — Madison Bumgarner is accustomed to being the center of attention.So it’s no surprise that Bumgarner’s free agency is one of the hottest early topics of this year’s Winter Meetings.The former San Francisco Giants starter is considered one of the top pitchers available this offseason and as the market for ace Gerrit Cole takes shape, so does the market for the No. 1 left-hander. Multiple reports have indicated Bumgarner is seeking a five-year deal similar to the one …last_img read more

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The wonder of the Tswaing Crater

first_imgTswaing Crater was created from a meteorite hitting the earth 220 000 years ago. (Image: Wikipedia Hungary)MEDIA CONTACTS• Julia [email protected]+27 79 829 5464RELATED ARTICLES• A paradise for rescued birds • Visitors marvel at SA’s natural wonder • Maropeng top evotourism destinationLucille DavieSome 220 000 years ago a meteorite half a soccer field in diameter, travelling at 4 000 kilometres per hour, hit what is now the Gauteng province of South Africa, exploding with the impact of 100 atomic bombs. The result was the Tswaing Meteorite Crater, just over one kilometre in diameter, now a spectacular natural wonder with a salt lake at its heart.Some 40 kilometres north of Pretoria, the site attracts 14 000 visitors a year, mostly Gautengers, who come to marvel at the crater, nestled within a 60m-high forested ring.The crater is one of around 170 impact craters in the world and one of four known impact craters in South Africa. What’s special about Tswaing is that it is one of the best preserved meteorite craters in the world, and secondly, that it’s very accessible – you can walk down into the crater, taking in its quiet beauty.At the point of impact, the immediate area up to three kilometres around the crater, all life forms and rock as well as the meteorite itself would have vaporised. A broader area of 1 000 square kilometres would have been flattened. A gigantic air blast of up to 1 000 kilometres per hour would have added to the destruction.These days the whole site is covered in dense bushveld, and walking along the trail on the rim, you’ll look down into this marvellous phenomenon, with the small 100-metre diameter lake at its centre.The lake is filled by rain water and a spring. It used to contain high concentrations of salt and soda ash, which were mined for 44 years until 1956. The salt content has dropped, making it no longer viable to mine.Natural heritageToday the crater is contained within a 2 000ha nature reserve focused on the preservation of the natural and cultural heritage. The reserve consists of several habitats: wetland, savannah, forest, riverine bush, and its own ecosystem centred around the salt lake, which is 13 times saltier than the Dead Sea, says Julia Barnes, deputy director of Ditsong: Tswaing Meteorite Crater.The Soutpanspruit, a stream running east of the crater, feeds an extensive wetland system, with a mini delta harbouring numerous streams and islands. Up to 250 bird species have been recorded, among them the African hawk eagle, the river warbler, bee eaters and kingfishers. Game is abundant: kudu, impala, zebra, warthog, mongoose, snakes and leguaans or monitor lizards are to be found. Up to 480 plant species have been recorded in two rare habitats, says Barnes.From the onset, the Tswaing Meteorite Crater management team invited community participation in its planning and development. Local communities have already benefited through job creation, skills training, environmental education, income-generating projects and tourism.HistoryTswaing was originally thought to be a volcano, but in 1989 boreholes were drilled into the crater floor, hitting solid granite at 200m. Analysis of quartz grains showed that there were shatter cones and recrystallised glass fragments, typical of an impact, confirming its origins as the remains of the meteorite impact.Also revealed were the climatic conditions going back 200 000 years. Unlike the present climate of sub-tropical and dry-humid conditions, in the past there were alternating dry and wet periods, and at one point the site was a forest of yellowwood trees. These drill sites now contribute to the water flow into the lake and are still visible in the form of pipes protruding from it.The analysis revealed too what animals, now extinct, lived at the time of the impact. These include the giant wildebeest or hartebeest, a long-horned giant buffalo and a giant zebra.The arrival of humansThe name Tswaing means “place of salt” in Tswana. The first visitors to the site arrived during Middle Stone Age times, about 150 000 to 30 000 years ago. Small nomadic groups came to Tswaing to hunt game, gather edible and medicinal plants and to collect salt.Around 800 years ago, Iron Age people came visiting. Their artefacts, such as decorated clay pots, have been found on the crater floor, indicating the presence of early Sotho or Tswana peoples. Their main reason for visiting was to collect salt, used for preserving and flavouring food, as well as for trading.People subsequently settled in the area, farming cattle and crops, and collecting salt for domestic use.When colonists reached the area they named it Zoutpan (Afrikaans, meaning “salt pan”), and settled, farming in the area.In 1912 a soda mine was established in the crater and operated until 1956. After several grazing research projects in the area, in 1993 the department of agriculture took over a portion of the farm Zoutpan, and developed it into an ecotourism destination for environmental education, recreation and research.These days various festivals are held at the site, the most popular being a music fest held in March. Accommodation is available in the form of four dormitory huts, sleeping 16 people each. The site is available for weddings and special occasions.Guides are available for tours of the site, which is open from 7.30am to 4pm daily.Local communities see the site as having religious importance. Sangomas, or diviners, are trained here at night. There is a belief that a snake lurks in the lake, says Barnes.Vredefort DomeAnother impact crater can be found about 120 kilometres south-west of Johannesburg in the neighbouring Free State province. The 250-300-kilometre wide Vredefort impact crater – formed by an asteroid some 10 kilometres in diameter hitting the earth – is located. Known as the Vredefort Dome, it dates back two-billion years.This crater is not as clearly identifiable as Tswaing as it covers a much larger area, but its northern edges reach southern Johannesburg.The significance of the Vredefort Dome is that when the asteroid hit the earth, the gold-bearing rocks of the Witwatersrand, which were deposited some 800-million years prior to the Vredefort impact, were downfaulted and covered with impact debris, being thus protected and preserved from erosion over the subsequent aeons.That gold was discovered in Johannesburg in 1886, and decades later, is still being mined. One such operation extends to almost four kilometres below the surface – it is TauTona in Gauteng, the world’s deepest mine.last_img read more

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