Some jobs falling victim to the coronavirus pandemic

first_img WhatsApp WhatsApp Twitter By Network Indiana – August 3, 2020 0 200 Facebook Twitter Pinterest Facebook Pinterestcenter_img One hard truth some Hoosiers may have to face after the pandemic is that their jobs might not exist any more. Republic Airways announced job cuts this weekend, with the layoffs of around 300 people. The Indiana Pacers also announced furloughs. Gerry Dick with Inside Indiana Business, says some companies who are laying people off may learn to work without them.“Businesses are always looking at ways to become more efficient, to do things better and do it for less money, to save money,” said Dick. “This pandemic, as awful as it is and has been, has given companies a bit of a test run.”He said that test run may be used to look at work from home models and doing more with less.“I think you’ll see more than a few companies change their look from a staffing standpoint, going forward.”That new look could be what puts people out of a job. But, Dick said there are new opportunities to go along with the ones that disappear.“It’s also been an opportunity, though, for individuals to get more training, new training, to upgrade their skills and to do things during the pandemic that can benefit them on the other side in terms of new opportunities,” he said.Dick said there are also new opportunities for business, as the previous ones fade. He said the Indiana Economic Development Corporation has been working to make sure Indiana is able to offer incentives to new businesses that, after the pandemic, may be looking for a place to locate.“Bringing that, lessening that dependence on some of the foreign manufacturing operations, bringing some of that back to the United States, and counting on Indiana as a place to make that happen.”Dick said the state has been making a push to bring aerospace and aeronautics companies to the state, which bring with them high-paying jobs. (“Unemployment Office” by Bytemarks, CC BY 2.0) Google+ Google+ Some jobs falling victim to the coronavirus pandemic IndianaLocalNews Previous article7-Eleven buying Speedway stores, effect on gas pricesNext articlePlanet Fitness makes a change to their mask policy Network Indianalast_img read more

Continue reading

Board to meet November 30

first_imgBoard to meet November 30 November 15, 2001 Regular News A discussion on multidisciplinary and multijurisdictional practices, the annual audit report of Bar finances, and the last of this year’s two-year cycle procedural rule amendments will be among the items addressed by the Bar Board of Governors at its November 30 meeting. Governors will also take up again an appeal of an ethics opinion on advance funding, make a variety of appointments, and hear a report from the Family Law Section on its activities. The board will be having one of its periodic out-of-state meetings, this time in Atlanta. More than 900 Florida Bar members practice in the greater Atlanta area, and a reception, sponsopred by the Out-of-State Practioners Division, is planned to give those lawyers a chance to meet with board members. State Bar of Georgia President Jimmy Franklin and members of that bar’s Executive Committee will be attending the meeting, and a panel discussion is planned with members of both groups on the multidisciplinary and multijurisdictional practice issues. The Florida Bar has been a leader in the effort to block the establishment or growth of MDPs, while the Georgia bar is considering what position to take on that issue. The Florida Bar is studying the MJP issue, which is concerned about when it is proper for out-of-state attorneys to handle legal issues and related topics, including disciplinary questions. The Criminal Procedure Rules, Workers’ Compensation Rules, and Code and Rules of Evidence committees will present their two-year cycle rule amendments to the board for its review. That will complete the initial year of the new biennial rule cycle process, which has the procedural rules committees presenting amendments every other year, instead of the previous four-year cycle, and half of the committees presenting their changes in any given year. The Audit Committee will present the findings of the Bar’s outside auditors on the fiscal 2000-01 year operations, along with any recommendations from the auditors. That fiscal year ended June 30. The board will revisit Proposed Advisory Opinion 00-3 from the Professional Ethics Committee, which addresses advance funding companies. Those companies offer to loan money to personal injury clients secured only by expected winnings. The PAO 00-3 holds it is ethical for attorneys to tell clients about advance funding companies and, if the client gives written consent after consultation, to share confidential information with a funding company. An early version of the opinion also held that lawyers could issue letters of protection to the funding company, but the final version omitted that. It did say a lawyer could honor such a letter executed by a client. Some board members, at their October meeting, expressed reservations about the ethics of advance funding companies and the interest rates charged. Others said while some companies might be unsavory, it was not the lawyers’ duty to prevent clients from entering into such agreements. The board tabled the issue so members could review earlier drafts of PAO 00-3. Family Law Section Chair Norman Levin is scheduled to present the section’s annual report to the board. He is also expected to meet with the Disciplinary Procedure Committee over a planned revision to Rule 4-1.8(i), which prohibits an attorney from obtaining an interest in the client’s property which is subject to the cause of action. The DPC is considering an amendment to clarify that lawyers may not obtain a mortgage on client’s property, which would include property being divided in a divorce. The Family Law Section’s Executive Council has voted to oppose that, saying it would make it harder for some clients to obtain lawyers. The council also has gone on record in favor of allowing lawyers to get a percentage of property divided in a divorce as a way to improve access to the justice system. Appointments to be made include: • One lawyer from the federal Northern District of Florida for a four-year term on the 11th Circuit Judicial Conference. • One lawyer for a two-year term on the Greater Orlando Area Legal Services, Inc., Board of Directors. • Five lawyers, one from each district court of appeal jurisdiction, for two-year terms on the Florida Realtor-Attorney Joint Committee. • One lawyer for a three-year term on the Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc., Board of Directors. The complete agenda can be found at the Bar’s website, www.FLABAR.org.center_img Board to meet November 30last_img read more

Continue reading

Florida lawyers are federalized

first_imgFlorida lawyers are federalized May 15, 2006 Regular News Florida lawyers are federalized Four sections sponsor CLE event in Washington, D.C. Greeted by blooming flowers and sunshine, four Florida Bar groups hosted The Federal Seminar 2006 in Washington, D.C., in April.The three-day program, jointly sponsored by the Government Lawyer, Environmental and Land Use Law, Appellate Practice sections and the Out-of-State Practitioners Division provided opportunities for 25 Florida lawyers to explore topics of federal law in some of the nation’s most prestigious buildings.“Through this program, Florida’s lawyers gain access and experiences that they probably could not otherwise obtain,” said Keith Rizzardi, co-chair of seminar. “organizing this program on behalf of so many groups in The Florida Bar, and by arranging for such unique locations, we’ve also been able to obtain first-rate speakers for the events.”Registrants for the program attended oral arguments and a swearing-in ceremony at the U.S. Supreme Court, followed by a continuing legal education program, held in the Court’s West Conference Room, with Deputy Solicitor General Thomas Hungar and environmental law casebook author Robert Percival. Three past presidents of the Federal Circuit Bar led a discussion at the Florida House on federal circuit practice. The White House Council on Environmental Quality hosted a “Conversation with CEQ” and wine and cheese reception at the Old Executive Office Building’s Indian Treaty Room, next to the White House. And agency officials, lobbyists, and nonprofit advocacy groups led panel discussions related to APA litigation and ethical lobbying at the U.S. Department of Interior.The Federal Seminar 2006 also had a unique social component.“When will any of us get another chance to lunch with the clerk of the Supreme Court, take a private tour of the Interior Building, raid the White House Airlift Operations gift shop, and pose for photos in front of the West Wing?” asked Ward Griffin, the other seminar co-chair.The Government Lawyer Section initially began this program with The Federal Seminar 2004, held at the Supreme Court, Justice Department, National Archives, and Library of Congress. The program leaders expect The Federal Seminar to continue to grow and evolve.“We hope that this program will become an essential CLE for people seeking state and federal government and administrative practice certification,” said Rizzardi, referring to the proposed certification program currently awaiting final approval by the Florida Supreme Court.“Ideally, we’ll host the Washington, D.C., program every even-numbered year,” Griffin said. “The challenge will be keeping the group sizes manageable, and getting all the needed security clearances. But I know we’re gaining momentum, because I’m already getting inquiries about when we plan to host this program again.”last_img read more

Continue reading