Body of man recovered from river after tragic incident

first_imgThe body of a man was recovered from the River Eske in Donegal Town this Tuesday morning.Emergency services were called to the scene after receiving a report from a member of the public who saw the body in the river near Donegal Castle.The body was recovered from the water and brought to Letterkenny University Hospital for a post mortem examination today. The incident is being described as a ‘tragic accident’.The man, who was aged in his mid-40s, is believed to be local.Gardaí are not treating the death as suspicious.A garda spokesperson said the post mortem will determine the course of the investigation. Body of man recovered from river after tragic incident was last modified: July 22nd, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Cryptocurrency — What you need to know from a tax perspective

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Brian E. Ravencraft, CPA, CGMA, Partner at Holbrook & Manter, CPAsRegardless of your opinion about cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, one thing is for certain — they are here to stay. Since their beginnings a decade ago, much mystery has surrounded cryptocurrencies regarding their origins, value and purposes. As cryptocurrencies have become more established and accepted as payment, it is more important to understand what the treatment and consequences of purchasing, selling, paying with and accepting as payment cryptocurrencies from a tax perspective.Per IRS Notice 2014-21, cryptocurrencies are not legal tender, but are generally regarded as property comparable to that of a stock, bond or other investments. Treating cryptocurrencies in this manner means whenever a cryptocurrency is purchased as an investment, the basis in the cryptocurrency is the purchase price plus any permitted transaction fees just like other stock that is traded on an exchange. This also means that whenever the cryptocurrency is sold, a capital gain or loss will result from its sale. Simple enough, but what happens when you pay for goods or services with cryptocurrency?When you pay for goods or services with cryptocurrency, per Notice 2014-21, the IRS will treat that transaction the same as if you sold it. For example, if you paid $1,000 worth of Bitcoin for your purchases on Overstock.com, you would have $1,000 in proceeds for tax purposes as the payment to Overstock.com would be treated the same as if it were the sale of Bitcoin as an investment. This means every time you purchase something with a cryptocurrency you will either have a capital gain or loss depending on what your basis (value + permitted transaction fees) of the cryptocurrency was when you purchased it. That’s good to know, but what happens if you are paid in cryptocurrency?If you are paid in cryptocurrency for either goods of services, per Notice 2014-21, it is treated as though you were paid in equivalent cash amount of cryptocurrency and you must report it as ordinary income subject to federal income tax. That amount that you were paid will also be your basis in the cryptocurrency.The takeaway from all of this — be diligent and informed about any cryptocurrency transactions that you have made or are going to make. If you are about to purchase, sell, pay with or accept as payment cryptocurrencies remember to do the following:Keep records of the dates of the transactionsKeep records of the numerical number of cryptocurrency units transactedKeep records of the individual unit prices of the cryptocurrency in U.S. Dollars for the transaction datesDoing these three items will help you be compliant with cryptocurrency transactions when dealing with the IRS. If you have any tax issues with cryptocurrencies or any other tax matters, please contact your accountant. I am always available to answer your questions as well. Brian E. Ravencraft, CPA, CGMA is a Principal with Holbrook & Manter, CPAs. Brian has been with Holbrook & Manter since 1995, primarily focusing on the areas of Tax Consulting and Management Advisory Services within several firm service areas, focusing on agri-business and closely held businesses and their owners. Holbrook & Manter is a professional services firm founded in 1919 and we are unique in that we offer the resources of a large firm without compromising the focused and responsive personal attention that each client deserves. You can reach Brian through www.HolbrookManter.comlast_img read more

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Three Easy and Essential Advanced Framing Techniques

first_imgThe only reason they’re not already used on every stick-built house is inertia. “We’ve been doing it this way for 30 years and it’s never been a problem.” If you’re a builder and worried about trying something new, check out Matt Risinger’s video about standard framing versus advanced framing.The exterior walls in a typical house are 25% framing. Wood has an R-value of about 1 per inch. Most insulation is close to 4 per inch. Using these advanced framing techniques will reduce the amount of wood in those walls and increase the insulation.It’s time to get over the inertia. These things are easy, easy, easy. Your house won’t fall down. Instead, your house will be better. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, building science consultant, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. Most new homes in North America are built with sticks. The early home builders used bigger pieces of wood — timbers — and when the smaller dimensional lumber that we use so much today hit the market, they scoffed at those new-fangled little woody things, calling them sticks. Now our home construction industry is full of people who do stick building and the home you live is most likely stick-built. And sadly, many of the techniques used to build many of those homes are the same used before we started insulating them.Before insulation became widespread, it didn’t matter if you put extra wood in your walls. In fact, many builders still think more wood is better. But when your insulation goes into the cavities between framing members, every extra bit of wood means less insulation. That means more heat loss in winter and more heat gain in summer because wood has an R-value less than a third that of most insulation. (Putting all the insulation on the outside is better, but that’s more expensive and not likely to happen on a wide scale in the residential market.)The good news is there are some simple ways to improve the framing and get more insulation without compromising the structural stability of the home. Here are three I think ought to be used on every stick-built home.Ladder T-wallsThis one is a no-brainer. When an interior wall intersects an exterior wall, the standard practice is to use three studs to complete the T-wall. The photo above shows what that looks like.[Image credit: U.S. Department of Energy]The oriented strand board (OSB) sheathing you see in the photo above will get covered with insulation. The space between those two studs in the exterior wall, however, won’t get any insulation. There’s no way to get it there. (Well, you could drill holes and try to spray foam in there, but spraying foam in a closed cavity risks blowing out the wall or leaving voids. Plus, few builders would take the time to do that.)One easy solution is the ladder T-wall. The diagram at right shows what it looks like.Rather than vertical studs, you take some of your scrap wood and run it across horizontally. You put the wide side against the T-wall stud so you have space in the back to insulate that cavity. It’s beautiful! You save wood and get a better-insulated house, too.The photo above is from the North Central Georgia affiliate of Habitat for Humanity. We work with them and are always impressed with their ability to implement stuff like this.Here’s what it looks like in real life (right).It’s got 1-by deadwood for drywall and what is essentially fireblocking through the cavity.Of course, there are variations of advanced framing at T-walls. Here’s one that a client of ours used a few years ago (right). RELATED ARTICLESThe Pros and Cons of Advanced FramingGBA Encyclopedia: Efficient Framing Fine Homebuilding: ”The Future of Framing Is Here” by Joseph Lstiburek The advanced framing alternative is to use three studs but leaves an opening to get insulation back into the corner, like this (right).It’s usually called a California corner here in the Southeast. I’m not sure what it’s called in California. Maybe just a corner? That DOE fact sheet I mentioned above also shows how to do a two-stud corner. Here’s the diagram (right).It uses less wood and gives you even more space for insulation. Check out the fact sheet for more details on that.center_img The natural solution here is to throw some insulation in the gap. You can do it easily with rigid foam board. If you don’t like foam, you can use mineral wool or something else. Just get some insulation in there. Otherwise, you’ve got a thermal bridge that wastes your heating and cooling dollars and could create other problems, like making your mean radiant temperature uncomfortably cold in winter or hot in summer.The image at right (from the same U.S. Dept. of Energy document on advanced framing as the ladder T-wall image) illustrates how it works.Going a step further, you can get more reduction of thermal bridging at headers by sizing them properly or not using them at all. A lot of framers will use the same size header in every opening of the house. But different openings have different loads to transmit. And some have no load. In those cases, you can make the header smaller or eliminate it, leaving room for even more insulation.Too easy not to useThese three advanced framing techniques for walls in stick-built homes are too easy not to use. In fact, some people will look at these and dispute their being called “advanced framing” at all. But in the Southeastern U.S. and some other regions, plenty of builders still haven’t adopted these three techniques. California corners and two-stud cornersThis is similar to the T-wall problem. The standard practice uses three studs and blocks off the corner so you can’t insulate it. Here’s what it looks like (right). Insulated headersHeaders abound in stick-built homes. They carry the load when you can’t put in studs at the regular spacing, as is the case where you have doors and windows. They’re often made with two pieces of bigger wood, like 2x10s, but they have a gap. In a 2×4 wall, two 2x10s on edge are 3″ thick. The wall is 3.5″ thick. In a typical home, that extra half inch is wasted. In a 2×6 wall, you’re wasting 2.5”.last_img read more

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