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first_imgGood Bread is Back- a contemporary history of French breadSteven Laurence KaplanAmerican historian Steven Kaplan traces the French bread-baking tradition, from the 18th Century right through industrialisation of the breadmaking process to the craft bakery revival of the 1990s, which was spurred on by government intervention.Kaplan also offers a personal account of how to assess the quality of French bread from the ideal crust and crumb, to mouth feel and aroma.last_img

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Law enforcement discusses safety with students

first_imgLocal law enforcement responded to questions about the new dorm swipe access policy, emergency blue lights on campus, discrimination at Notre Dame and other student safety concerns during a panel hosted by student government and the Notre Dame Police Department (NDPD) in the LaFortune Ballroom on Wednesday night.Panelists included NDPD captain Rob Martinez, NDPD major George Heeter, NDPD deputy chief Steve Smith and major Steve Noonan of the St. Joseph County Police Department. Attendees were invited to submit questions through the app, Poll Everywhere, or ask them publicly using a microphone.Natalie Weber | The Observer Multiple questions centered around whether NDPD has considered increasing the number of blue light phone systems, which are mainly located on the perimeter of Notre Dame’s campus. There are about 65 blue light emergency stations on campus currently, Martinez said. Smith said there has been discussion about increasing the number of blue lights, but currently, they are not used very frequently.“I think folks know where they are, and they know they can utilize them anytime they want, but to be quite honest, very few calls … are actually coming through those devices,” Smith said. “So if there is a need to increase [blue light emergency stations], we would certainly do that, but again we don’t get a lot of information or a lot of requests for service through those.”Several attendees also raised questions about safety following the implementation of the new dorm swipe access policy, which restricts students’ swipe access to their own dorms. Questions raised were concerns about people allowing strangers into their dorms, and attendees asked if there were any policies in the works to address this issue.Smith said he doesn’t know of any pending policies yet that are to be implemented in the dorms soon.“The one thing I would suggest is make sure you never leave a door propped open,” Smith said. “That’s been an issue in the past. … We encourage you not to do that, because it invites folks to come on in anytime they want. So to the extent that you can, I would ask that you monitor who comes in and not necessarily just let anybody in.”In response, one attendee submitted a question, raising concerns that women in particular might not feel comfortable turning away men who come to their dorms. The question asked if “full-time clerks” could be implemented in dorms to monitor who enters and exits.“That would be a great solution,” Smith said. “However, I think trying to staff an entrance like that is challenging.”Smith said NDPD has also considered installing cameras at the entrances of dorms to keep track of who comes into the dorm.“It’s early on in those discussions, but that is something that could help mitigate some of that,” he said. “And I understand it’s challenging. So what I would recommend, again, is getting to know your officers in the building. If there’s certain times of day that this is becoming an issue, let your officers know. Make them aware of that, and we can set extra patrols during that time.”In response, a student asked why the dorm swipe access policy was implemented, and suggested tracking students’ entrance to dorms with ID cards would be easier than other proposed safety solutions.“I think the University would have a perfect solution to address that issue, but it is very challenging to utilize a card so that every single person has to go through and that access is recorded, so we have documentation of that,” Smith said. “Again, that comes down to a University decision.”Martin added that the policy mirrored what other schools have enacted.“There was some benchmarking done on the process,” he said. “They’ve also been following some other universities that have actually implemented this policy.One question asked about how NDPD would response to racist slurs and threats to students of color on campus, especially in light of threats to minority students at Syracuse. NDPD is also investigating reports of “biased slurs” directed toward students Friday and Saturday that sparked a protest against hate speech.“Obviously, that’s something we want folks to report to us,” Smith said. “If you see behavior like that, or you learn of behavior like that, we want to know about it right away.”In response to a question about discrimination against LGBTQ students, law enforcement also encouraged students to report incidents to the police.Smith also discussed options for students who report sexual assault to law enforcement.“You have the option of saying ‘I want Notre Dame Police Department and the investigative team in Notre Dame Police Department to investigate that,’” he said. “Or, in St. Joseph County, we also have a Special Victims Unit … and as a student, you have the option of opting for them to investigate that crime as well.”When asked about safety in South Bend, Noonan recommended traveling in groups and being aware of one’s location. He also explained the situations that generally give rise to violence in South Bend.“Generally that violence is directed for a variety of reasons,” he said. “Sometimes it’s gang activity, sometimes a social media post can trigger violence. … The best thing for students is to stay in a group [and] always know where you’re going.”Heeter offered similar advice.“Know your surroundings, [there’s] strength in numbers, so always be with a group of other individuals,” he said.Tags: NDPD, St Joseph County Police, Student government, student safety summitlast_img read more

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Randy Frye on jobs, job training and graduates

first_imgIndianapolis, In. — Graduation season is upon us, and it is time to celebrate our local high school seniors who are finishing up their final classes. Students will now be facing important decisions regarding their next steps. Helpful tools like the Next Level Jobs initiative, Workforce Ready Grants, and Secondary Career and Technical Education are available to help guide those looking to gain more skills and information to enter the workforce.Indiana’s unemployment rate is 3.2 percent, which is one of the lowest in the nation. We can keep up this momentum by preparing our young Hoosiers for the ever-evolving job market. They need to be able to meet the increased needs of employers locating to and expanding in our state. In response to this, Gov. Eric Holcomb launched the Next Level Jobs initiative last year. This initiative provides Hoosiers access to new resources so they may secure advanced and better-paying jobs, and gives employers additional tools to help fill positions in high-demand fields.Workforce Ready Grants, established by legislation I supported, covers tuition costs for working-age Hoosiers pursuing technical jobs. These grants aim to grow and strengthen the labor force in our state by helping individuals seeking employment in high-wage jobs. The grant pays the tuition and mandatory fees at Ivy Tech Community College or Vincennes University. The certificate programs covered by the grant include advanced manufacturing, building and construction, health sciences, information technology and business technology, and transportation and logistics.Learn more about Next Level Jobs, the Workforce Ready Grant and other opportunities through the Next Level Jobs initiative at nextleveljobs.org.Additional tools Hoosiers should be aware of are the Secondary Career and Technical Education courses. These courses are available to youth and adults for a wide range of high-wage and high-skill technical careers. Students still in high school may, with parental consent, elect to release their information on a form provided by the Department of Education to potential employers recruiting students with a particular career and technical skill.The future of our workforce falls in the hands of our upcoming graduates, and they should be aware of the assistance that is available to them. If there is any way I can help connect you to a workforce resource or if you have any additional questions, please contact me at [email protected] or 317-234-3827. You can also stay up-to-date with the work being done at the Statehouse and news in our community by signing up to receive my email updates at www.in.gov/h67.last_img read more

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Magpies won’t sack Pardew over butt

first_img However while the former Reading, West Ham, Charlton and Southampton manager is likely to face further action from the Football Association, the Magpies will not impose further punishment. Pardew’s latest touchline misdemeanour came with his side leading the Tigers 3-1 and well on their way to a 4-1 Barclays Premier League victory. Meyler brushed past him inside his technical area as he chased the ball as it ran out of play, and the Newcastle manager reacted angrily, confronting the player before moving his head towards him. After the ensuing melee had abated, referee Kevin Friend cautioned Meyler and then sent Pardew to the stands, from where he watched the remainder of the game. He made a swift apology in his post-match interviews, one which was accepted by opposite number Steve Bruce, but that did not prevent his club from taking a dim view of his behaviour. LMA boss Bevan was equally unimpressed, and told BBC Radio 5 Live’s Sportsweek programme: “The buck stops with Alan. It’s unacceptable, it’s inappropriate and it’s insupportable from every perspective and Alan knows that. “He immediately realised the serious error, (made) sincere apologies to all parties and obviously (has) deep regret. “It was good to see (Hull boss) Steve Bruce’s reaction and Hull accepting (Pardew’s apology). “But Alan does need to think hard about how not to put himself in that position again.” Pardew said after the match he would have to “to sit down and stay out of the way” in future rather than roam his technical area to avoid getting embroiled in similar incidents. Bevan added: “I was pleased to see Newcastle in a very short period of time making a very swift, professional response that provided Alan with a very heavy fine and a formal warning.” Bevan also said the LMA was reviewing the technical area with a view to moving managers further away from the action. He added: “We did a technical report six or seven months ago, interviewing 40 referees and 40 managers, and we’re looking at the moment how the technical area works in America, for example, in other sports and seeing how we can look to improve several problems that occur because of the positioning.” Bevan admitted the tight confines of some of the old grounds would pose a problem, with the manager also needing to be kept out of the fans. He added: “But what we can do is make a serious effort to look at how the technical area should be placed.” Former FA executive director David Davies said a suspension for the remainder of the season was “conceivable” and described it as “a very serious matter which I suspect will be dealt with very severely”. Newcastle boss Alan Pardew will not face the sack over his headbutt on Hull midfielder David Meyler. Press Association Sport understands that the 52-year-old’s job is safe despite calls for his head following the ugly incident at the KC Stadium on Saturday, which League Managers Association chief executive Richard Bevan branded “unacceptable and inappropriate”. Owner Mike Ashley is understood to be furious with Pardew’s conduct on the touchline and the club announced late on Saturday night that he has been fined £100,000 and been severely reprimanded. Press Associationlast_img read more

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