Beer Blog: Old Chub Nitro…The Shaft of Beers

first_imgHere’s the beautiful thing about craft beer: Brewers are never satisfied with “good” or even “great.” They’re always finding new ways to take their beers to “11.” Bourbon barrel aging, dry hopping, blending batches, resting porters on cocoa nibs…They’re always looking for ways to make good beer better.Take Oskar Blues’ Old Chub. It’s an excellent beer. Absolutely nothing wrong with it. A perfect example of a Scotch ale—malty, biscuity, and chocolatey without being too decadent. It’s a hell of a beer.But that wasn’t good enough for Oskar Blues, so this year, they introduced cans of Old Chub juiced with nitrogen.Nitrogen is basically a different way of adding carbonation to the beer, typically malt forward beers like stouts or porters. The addition of nitrogen adds a creamy element to the beer. Guinness is the most famous example of a beer that’s gassed with nitrogen.Oskar Blues put a nitrogen widget in each 16-ounce can of their Scotch Ale. Pop the top and the gas is released into the beer. That’s an over simplification of the process, but I’m an overly simple guy.This new, nitrogen Old Chub, is better than the traditional Old Chub. It goes to 11. Pour the beer into a glass and the bubbles do this crazy wave dance thing as they make their way up the side of the glass. The beer has a thick head that looks like you could tap dance on, but it’s actually as soft as cotton candy. The drink itself is as smooth as Billy D. Williams.It’s stupid creamy. I’d like to see more beers get the nitro treatment. I’m sure it’s expensive as hell, but the result is addictive. It’s like taking your typical stout or porter, and filtering it through the Shaft soundtrack. You know what I’m saying? Smooth, people. Smooth…last_img read more

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Hong Kong could postpone election due to virus in blow for democracy camp

first_imgSome 600,000 people voted in unofficial primaries polls for the opposition in Hong Kong this month, sending a younger, more confrontational generation of pro-democracy politicians into the race for the legislature.One of them, prominent democracy activist Joshua Wong, said he would doubt the veracity of any coronavirus delay.”Using pandemic as an excuse to postpone the election is definitely a lie,” Wong said on Twitter.The Legislative Council, or Legco, election would be the first vote in the former British colony since the introduction of the national security legislation in the semiautonomous city. The law punishes what China broadly defines as secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces with up to life in prison and sees mainland Chinese security agents operating officially in the city for the first time.Critics of the law say it erodes the freedoms Hong Kong was promised when it was handed back to China by Britain in 1997, while supporters say it would restore stability after a year of often-violent pro-democracy protests in the city.Britain’s foreign minister, Dominic Raab, told top Chinese diplomat Wang Yi that Britain would be watching the Hong Kong elections closely and stressed that China needed to rebuild trust in the global community, a British Foreign Office spokesman said on Tuesday.Under city laws, the government can postpone elections if the chief executive is of the opinion that the vote “is likely to be obstructed, disrupted, undermined or seriously affected by riot or open violence or any danger to public health or safety”.A new election date, not more than 14 days after the original date, must be announced immediately, according to election laws. But British colonial-era legislation gives the government sweeping powers in case of emergency or public danger.It is not clear if former members of the city assembly, whose terms have expired, could return to the legislature in the event of a postponement for a year.Hong Kong has reported about 3,000 coronavirus cases since January and more than 20 deaths – far lower than in other major cities around the world.But the government has warned of a new surge of infections in the community and has banned dining in restaurants and limited group gatherings to two people.Rival finance hub Singapore, which has had a larger coronavirus outbreak, held a general election this month.At least 68 countries and territories have delayed national or regional elections due to the coronavirus since February, the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance said.At least 49 countries and territories have decided to hold national or subnational elections, it said.  Topics :center_img Hong Kong’s government could postpone by a year a vote for seats in the city’s legislature scheduled for Sept. 6 amid fears of a resurgence in novel coronavirus cases, public broadcaster RTHK reported on Wednesday.A postponement would be a blow for the opposition pro-democracy camp, which is aiming to win a historic majority in the city’s assembly given widespread resentment of Beijing’s imposition of a new security law widely criticized by Western countries as eroding citizens’ rights.The RTHK report cited unidentified sources and did not give any more details. The office of Chief Executive Carrie Lam and the Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Bureau did not immediately respond to a request for comment.last_img read more

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G20 pledges pipeline of infrastructure assets to lure institutional investors

first_imgIt added that work would be undertaken to develop infrastructure further as an asset class and increase the amount of financing available to markets.The document also committed G20 members to lowering barriers to investment, boosting the pipeline of projects ready for investment and helping pair up investors and projects.As part of the initiative, the G20 will launch an infrastructure hub based in Sydney to coordinate global governments’ efforts.Against expectations, the G20 also said it supported “strong and effective action” on climate change but did not include any specific wording on cultivating a low-carbon economy.This is despite a report tabled at the G20 finance ministers meeting advising countries on how to factor climate risk into both public and private investment.Australia’s prime minister, Tony Abbott, has previously expressed a desire for the annual meeting to focus solely on job creation measures and resisted attempts by other countries to include the issue of climate change on the agenda.Those in favour of the matter being discussed in Brisbane have pointed to the need for the largest economies to reach a compromise ahead of next year’s climate conference in Paris, which aims to agree new and binding carbon-reduction targets.The Institutional Investor Group on Climate Change (IIGCC), which earlier this year called on governments to create a regulatory environment conducive to low-carbon investments, last week called for the topic of climate change to be part of the G20 agenda in Brisbane.The organisation’s chief executive Stephanie Pfeifer said leaders of the world’s largest economies should seize the momentum building in the wake of the US government’s joint announcement with China to cut carbon emissions and emphasise the importance of a global agreement.“Politicians have said the focus of the G20 is jobs, growth and security,” Pfeifer said. “Tackling climate change by moving to a low-carbon economy provides an opportunity to deliver all three.“Global investors need strong political signals about the direction of travel on climate change in order to invest in low-carbon assets. World leaders should not waste the opportunity to send these signals this weekend.”The OECD will be holding a conference on long-term investment policy in Paris on 26 November The world’s largest economies are to ensure regulation is not preventing pension funds and other institutions from investing in infrastructure under an agreement signed at the G20 summit.The meeting, held on Brisbane, Australia, saw the heads of government agree to implement the OECD’s high-level principles of long-term investment financing, which said public funding should not “crowd out” private long-term capital.In a communiqué announcing the G20 global infrastructure initiative, world leaders said they would look to increase the transparency and functioning of securitisation markets, a goal of the European Commission to attract funding to small and medium-sized enterprises.“These actions will assist in our goal to attract increased private sector financing for infrastructure investment and for small and medium enterprises,” the agreement said.last_img read more

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Mata: United fans deserve better

first_imgManchester United forward Juan Mata admits he was “mad” he was not able to give fans what they deserved in the defeat to Liverpool. Sunday’s 3-0 loss at Old Trafford stood out not only for the visitors underlining their credentials as Premier League title challengers, but also United’s inability to compete against their north-west rivals. But even after the final whistle, large pockets of supporters remained to voice their support for the team and Mata said he was disappointed the players could not match that level of performance. United striker Wayne Rooney described the defeat to Liverpool as one of the darkest days of his career. “It’s one of the worst days I’ve ever had in football,” Rooney told MUTV. “It’s hard to take. You have to give Liverpool credit – they played well – but it’s difficult to take. Nobody wants to lose, especially in this way, in your own stadium. It’s not nice.” Manager David Moyes admits his first season at Old Trafford after succeeding Sir Alex Ferguson is harder than he ever imagined. “The job was always going to be hard. Harder? Yes I would say so yes,” said the Scot, who has not given up hope of finishing in the top four despite being 12 points adrift of Manchester City, who have two matches in hand. “It will be very difficult but it’s not over yet, so we have to keep working as hard as we can towards trying to do it. “I’ve been saying for a while we’ve given ourselves a long task and a long road to try to get back in it.” “There are no words to describe your support in the stadium,” he wrote in his personal online blog. “In games like yesterday it makes me mad not being able to give you what you deserve. “I know there is nothing I can say right now but at least I want you to know how I feel.” Mata joined United from Chelsea in January for £38million but there has been no vast improvement in results, with just three wins from the seven matches he has been involved in, being ineligible for the Champions League defeat to Olympiacos. However, the 25-year-old believes the experience will make him a better player. “The storm will pass and the sun will rise again. I have no doubt,” said Mata. “Besides, no one said this would be easy but this is football. It gives you fantastic moments but also very hard times you have to cope with, when you have to show pride and professionalism until the end. “And when all this is gone I’m sure I will be a more mature footballer.” Press Associationlast_img read more

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