Sapura Energy secures five E&C contracts worth $179m

first_img Sapura Energy secured five new contracts totalling $179m. (Credit: Pixabay/wasi1370) Sapura Energy, through its Engineering and Construction (E&C) division, has secured five new contracts valued about RM766m ($179.1m) across Brunei, Singapore, Thailand and Malaysia.As part of the new contracts, Sapura Offshore has a contract from Brunei Shell Petroleum for the PRP7 Pipeline Replacement Project in Brunei.Under the contract, Sapura Offshore will be responsible for the replacement of the 16-inch 9.4km pipeline PID1494 along with the topside modification, and riser and pipeline demolition.Slated to be completed by the first quarter of FY2022, the work also includes optional scope of the replacement of the 6-inch one-kilometre pipeline PID2008 including topside modification, and riser and pipeline demolition.Sapura Energy secures contract for SBM Pipeline Rejuvenation Phase II projectThe firm along with its consortium partner Dredging International Asia Pacific has also secured an engineering, procurement, construction and installation contract from Shell Eastern Petroleum (Pte) for the single buoy mooring (SBM) Pipeline Rejuvenation Phase II Project in Singapore.The scope of the contract includes pre-emptive repair of the nearshore pipeline section, rejuvenate the SBM system and optional removal of existing pipeline to ensure fitness for service of the crude offloading system to Bukom Refinery in Singapore.The work on the contract is anticipated to be completed by the third quarter of FY2023.Chevron Thailand Exploration and Production (CTEP) has selected Sapura Energy for its Asset Retirement Offshore Removal Campaign in Thailand that will include project management, engineering, procurement, offshore heavy lifting vessel and transportation spread to decommission seven offshore jackets, wet tow and reef jacket at a reef site.Furthermore, Carigali-PTTEPI Operating Company (CPOC) has selected Sapura Offshore Sdn Bhd to provide EPCI services for the additional Andalas Pipeline Project Phase 4 Development.In July last year, Sapura Energy secured 10 new contracts valued at approximately £191m for its engineering & construction and drilling segments. Sapura Offshore has a contract from Brunei Shell Petroleum for the PRP7 Pipeline Replacement Project in Bruneilast_img read more

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Eric Krasno & Marcus King Announce Pool-Side Performance At “Playing In The Sand”

first_imgBlues-rock guitarists Eric Krasno and Marcus King will both play a pop-up, pool-side performance at Dead & Company‘s “Playing In The Sand” event down in Riviera Maya, Mexico on Saturday. The duo set was announced on Friday, and will take place at 1 p.m. local time at the pool of the Barceló Maya Colonia Hotel on Saturday afternoon, as attendees at the four-day destination event will look to continue their south-of-the-border party into the heart of the weekend.Both Krasno and King had been at sea the past few days, as both musicians were part of the ongoing 2019 installment of JamCruise. The two helped lead an all-star performance in the ship’s Spinnaker Lounge on Day 2 of JamCruise on Wednesday, where they rocked the boat alongside drummer Duane Trucks (Widespread Panic), keyboardist Deshawn “D-Vibes” Alexander (Marcus King Band), and Kevin Scott (The Invisible Whip). The pop-up performance on Saturday will act as the latest live collaboration between the two musicians/friends, as the guitarists have come to develop quite the tandem with recurring sit-ins at each others’ shows over the last few years as King’s career continues to blossom.Dead & Company had the day off on Friday following an impressive night one performance on Thursday. Fans and snowbirds who are at the event were also invited to check out the Dead-themed photo gallery event at The Hard Rock Hotel on Saturday morning, which featured showcased work from renowned GD photographer, Jay Blakesberg.Regardless of what beach-side plans attendees may have had for Saturday afternoon, fans should still try to make their way over to the Barceló Maya Colonia pool by 1 p.m. later this afternoon for a pre-Dead & Co. jam session.last_img read more

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Naples captures state mock trial crown

first_imgNaples captures state mock trial crown Naples captures state mock trial crown May 1, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img “Objection, your Honor!” These words rang through the Orange County Courthouse recently, but they were not the words of experienced trial attorneys; these were the words of high school students participating in the 2002 Florida High School Mock Trial Competition state finals.The Community School of Naples from Collier County won the first place Lady of Justice trophy and now will represent Florida at the National High School Mock Trial Championships in St. Paul, Minnesota, May 9-12. South Dade Senior High School finished second followed by Fletcher High School from Duval County, Pinellas Park High School, and Palm Bay High School from Brevard County.“This exercise in justice helps students learn to respect the rule of law and understand the processes in place in our democracy for resolving disputes,” said Annette Boyd Pitts, executive director of The Florida Law Related Education Association, which puts on the event. “The Mock Trial program teaches students about the legal system and the vital role our third branch of government has in our society. It instills trust and confidence in our courts.”Pitts said students who participate in the program not only gain a greater knowledge of the legal system, but they learn practical skills with lasting benefits.“Students learn how to think on their feet, make reasoned decisions, and gain important public speaking skills,” Pitts said.Did Metro City’s negligence cause the death of Sam Jones? Did Sam Jones cause his own death by knowingly drinking tap water contaminated with a parasite called Pindia? Are Sam Jones’ parents entitled to compensation for the death of their adult son? These were the legal issues examined by students arguing the fictional civil case Ricki Jones v. The City of Metro City, a civil case that asked whether the defendant was negligent and liable for the death of Sam Jones. Jones died of pindiatosis, in connection with AIDS, after drinking the city’s tap water which was infected with the parasite Pindia.Teams consisting of six to eight students studied the case for five months in preparation for the competition. Seventeen high schools and more than 170 students from across Florida participated in the program.More than 250 volunteers from Florida’s legal community donated approximately 1,000 service hours to the event, serving as judges and coaches in the mock trial circuit and state competitions. At the end of each round the judges gave critiques and advice to the students.last_img read more

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£2bn race to beat duty rise

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Cycling: Armstrong backs investigation into murky past

first_imgLance Armstrong welcomed an investigative report into the murky past of cycling’s governing body and said he hopes it can help the sport move on from an era that will always be remembered for the doping by himself and others.The report turned up no evidence to sustain previous allegations that Armstrong paid the UCI to cover up a positive doping test back in his heyday, yet it explains in great detail how the UCI acted favorably toward Armstrong — a rider dubbed “cycling’s pop star.”The Cycling Independent Reform Commission (CIRC) was requested by Brian Cookson, the current UCI president. Its report examined how the doping culture during Armstrong’s era was allowed to fester under the previous UCI leadership of former president Pat McQuaid and predecessor Hein Verbruggen.“I am grateful to CIRC for seeking the truth and allowing me to assist in that search. I am deeply sorry for many things I have done,” Armstrong said in a statement. “It is my hope that revealing the truth will lead to a bright, dope-free future for the sport I love, and will allow all young riders emerging from small towns throughout the world in years to come to chase their dreams without having to face the lose-lose choices that so many of my friends, teammates and opponents faced.”Armstrong is trying to overturn a life ban imposed by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. He was stripped of his seven Tour titles for doping on every one of his wins from 1999-2005.Armstrong’s attorney, Elliot Peters, said Armstrong “cooperated fully” with senior investigators over two days, answering all questions “without any restrictions” and providing “all documents requested to which he had access.” In their affidavits provided to USADA — whose scathing report in 2012 exposed systematic doping by Armstrong and others — former U.S. Postal teammates Tyler Hamilton and Floyd Landis declared that Armstrong had told them separately that he tested positive for the performance enhancer EPO at the 2001 Tour de Suisse.Landis claimed that the test was hushed up as a result of a financial agreement with Verbruggen.Armstrong was tested five times during the 2001 Tour de Suisse. Three samples were tested for EPO and they came back negative, although there was a “strong suspicion” that two of the “A” samples did contain traces of the banned blood booster, the CIRC report said — adding that it deemed inappropriate the fact that “Armstrong and his entourage were informed by the UCI of these suspect test results.”A year later, Armstrong sent Verbruggen a letter containing a check for $25,000 as a donation toward the fight against doping. Although CIRC has “not found any indication of a financial agreement” the report said the “UCI did not act prudently in accepting a donation from an athlete” already under suspicion.The collusion between Armstrong and the UCI’s leadership features strongly in the 227-page report. Armstrong’s lawyers were allowed to draft parts of a supposedly independent report, which sought to debunk French daily L’Equipe’s claims in 2005 that Armstrong’s samples at the 1999 Tour later tested positive for EPO.The independent report into the ’99 allegations, which was led by Dutch lawyer Emile Vrijman, was heavily criticized because it “specifically excluded an examination of the EPO test,” meaning it deliberately avoided addressing whether Armstrong used the substance. The Vrijman report coincided with an agreement between Armstrong and the UCI that he would donate $100,000 for the purchase of a Sysmex blood testing machine. This prompted allegations that his latest donation to the UCI’s anti-doping cause was an indirect payment to help fund the Vrijman report and quash L’Equipe’s story.The CIRC did not find “any evidence to corroborate” such allegations but said the UCI acted improperly “in soliciting and accepting donations from an athlete” under increasing suspicion.The close-knit relationship helped Armstrong on the ’99 Tour when he tested positive for a banned corticosteroid. Armstrong did not declare pre-race that he was using medication — even though the argument he used for using a corticoid cream was to treat saddle sores. Rather than start disciplinary proceedings, the UCI accepted a backdated prescription and cleared him. Armstrong, having retired after the 2005 Tour, was also cleared by the UCI to make his comeback at Australia’s Tour down Under in 2009 — despite not being eligible because he had not been in the UCI’s doping testing pool for a six-month period beforehand.McQuaid first wrote to Armstrong, firmly telling him he could not race. But two days after that, McQuaid informed him that he could compete. The same day, Armstrong told McQuaid that he would race in the 2009 Tour of Ireland, which McQuaid was keen to promote in his homeland.In one email sent to McQuaid, written at the time of USADA’s impending investigation, a UCI consultant refers to Armstrong as “cycling’s pop star” and states clearly that for the sake of its image the “UCI has an interest that LA is acquitted.”last_img read more

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