Darke County Fair gets use of New Holland T5.110

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest On Wednesday, June 5, The Darke County Agricultural Society received a brand new blue tractor from Apple Farm Service. Apple Farm Service gladly donated a New Holland T5.110 to the Great Darke County Fair to be used for the next six months.“This is the second tractor that Apples has donated for us to use,” said Brian Rismiller, fair manager. “Last year we were given a Case IH tractor to use. We truly appreciate that Apple thought of us again!”The Darke County Fairgrounds will have the opportunity to break in this new tractor for the next six months. They plan to use it primarily to rake the arena and maintain the horse barns.“We’re happy to help the Darke County Ag Society!” said Bill Apple, president of Apple Farm Service. “New Holland enjoys working with their dealerships to support local nonprofit organizations like the Ag Society. Some of our employees have fond memories of showing animals and projects in the Darke County fair. We are thrilled to give back to a staple of this community.”This New Holland T5.110 tractor won’t stay long after its short stay at the fairgrounds. This 114 horse-power utility tractor will be for sale to a well-deserving farmer with a sizable discount and a new warranty. For now, it’ll be working hard at the Great Darke County Fairgrounds.last_img read more

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Electric Vehicles Hit a Pothole in California

first_imgRate changes lead to a petition driveAmong the changes SCE made, Gray says, was to shorten the summer season from seven to five months, and shift peak hours from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. to 2 p.m. to 8 p.m.“Whether a wild coincidence or not, these changes will drastically impact existing solar owners as our systems will only earn a fraction of the credits we have earned in the past,” Gray writes at the website. “SEC has figured out a way to stop paying us for our solar generation, at present rates, at a time when most of us have only recently made our solar investments in good faith and with no knowledge that these rate changes were about to occur.”Gray argues the TOU-D-TEV plan should be grandfathered. The website includes links to local state representatives, the Public Utilities Commission, and the governor’s office as well as an online petition to roll back the decision.For its part, SEC told Gray in a letter he would be transitioned to a new rate plan in February that would actually work to his advantage.“These new rate options may help to reduce your electric vehicle charging costs because they offer a longer off-peak period when electricity prices are the lowest, and a shorter on-peak period when electricity prices are the highest,” SEC told him. Some electric vehicle owners in California think they’ve been sideswiped by changes to a utility rate plan that helped them pay for their photovoltaic (PV) systems.Vehicle owners like Joseph Gray are critical of a decision by the California Public Utilities Commission allowing Southern California Edison to alter a time-of-day rate structure and make it harder for them to recoup the cost of photovoltaic systems installed to keep their vehicles charged, Greentech Media reported.Gray bought his first electric vehicle, a Chevy Volt, in 2011 and then spent another $68,000 out of pocket for a PV system to keep it charged, Gray says at a website called ProtectOurRates. The size of the system and payback calculations were based on a rate plan from Southern California Edison (SCE) called TOU-D-TEV.“When you produce your own solar during peak, and send it back to SCE, they would give you a credit equal to what they would have charged you for the same energy,” Gray says. “Also, because I shifted a lot of my energy use to super off peak, I was banking a lot of credit during the day which more than covered my usage in other dayparts. “Gray modeled his system to break even in 6 1/2 years, and actually finished his first year with PV with a $300 surplus. The SCE rate changes threw those calculations out the window.last_img read more

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Jammu and Kashmir | When counting of the dead came to a halt

first_imgMubeena Akhtar, 22, a resident of Srinagar’s Jogi Lankar area, and the eldest of three siblings, is battling to sustain her family after her father, a government employee, passed away in the last week of July. Two months on, Ms. Akhtar is unable to obtain a death certificate necessary for claiming the monthly pension benefits.For the first time in the last three decades, the Srinagar Municipal Corporation (SMC) has stopped counting the dead and newborns in the city due to the Internet shutdown, enforced after the August 5 decision to revoke J&K’s special status.The official record showed no deaths or births registered between August 5 and August 26. However, in the month of September, the department only managed to issue 467 temporary ‘under-process’ certificates to the needy.“We have been pleading with the BSNL to restore Internet on a humanitarian basis. Finally, the government, this Monday, managed to activate a private lease line for Internet service. Fourteen formal certificates have been issued on Tuesday,” SMC health officer Dr. Qazi Javaid told The Hindu.Prior to August 5, the SMC would issue, on an average, 1,500 death and birth certificates per month. These certificates are a must for school admissions, banks account closures and pension cases. The SMC contacted local banks, school authorities and other departments to entertain all under-process certificates for the time being, Dr. Javaid said.“We issued temporary certificates since it’s admission time in schools. We ensured that students are not deprived of the right to education,” he said.In the case of a destitute from Srinagar’s Ganai Doori area, Dr. Javaid said, the SMC delivered the death certificate at their doorstep “to avoid suffering on account of pension money”. “The non-availability of Internet dealt a blow to our system. We are back on track from this week,” he added.The Valley is facing Internet shutdown for 58 days now. The SMC officials said they have a huge task now. “We have to re-verify all under-process certificates to ensure no fudging has happened. We fear in many cases parents had resorted to mischief and their wards are going to suffer in school admissions once the re-verification process begins.”Meanwhile, a government spokesman said the Internet service had been halted to stop militants from launching any attacks and to defy any bid to stoke civilian unrest. He, however, did not commit on any timeline on restoration of the service.last_img read more

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