Construction Begins on NYC’s First Prefab Steel and Concrete R…

first_imgConstruction Begins on NYC’s First Prefab Steel and Concrete Residential DevelopmentSave this articleSaveConstruction Begins on NYC’s First Prefab Steel and Concrete Residential Development “COPY” “COPY” Save this picture!Courtesy of GLUCK+Written by Nicky RackardMarch 30, 2013 Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/352689/construction-begins-on-nyc-s-first-prefab-steel-and-concrete-residential-development Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/352689/construction-begins-on-nyc-s-first-prefab-steel-and-concrete-residential-development Clipboard CopyPrefabrication has long been heralded as a possible way to infill New York’s vacant sites, however it is only in recent years that it has become a solid practical solution rather than an experimental concept. Riding the crest of the wave of new prefabricated housing is GLUCK+ (formerly Peter Gluck & Partners), in collaboration with developers Jeffrey Brown and Kimberly Frank. Together they have began construction on one of New York’s first prefabricated steel and concrete residential buildings.Read more about this and New York’s recent wave of prefabricated buildings after the break… Save this picture!Courtesy of GLUCK+Dubbed ‘Broadway Stack’, the 38,000 square foot building will contain 28 high quality, moderate income apartments atop 4,000 square feet of ground floor commercial space in the Inwood neighborhood of Manhattan. At the moment, 5,000 square feet worth of traditional foundations and services exists on-site, awaiting the imminent arrival of fifty-six prefabricated modules from a factory in Pennsylvania. The assembly of these modules into a seven-story building will take four weeks, with an additional three months after for connecting utilities, assembling the facade and adding the finishing touches. Members of the project team will be onsite to provide viewing of the assembly during the week of April 15. center_img ArchDaily Prefabrication has become popular in recent years due to the efficiency and quality it affords. The result generally leads to lower construction costs, less waste, less energy consumption, less noise and pollution on site, and tighter quality control. It also provides a convenient way to build on some of New York’s smaller sites, which don’t have the space to host traditional construction. Plus the reduction in cost means that high quality housing can be made available to lower income New Yorkers. New York is going through somewhat of a prefabrication renaissance, although this is first of many. Also in the pipeline is the winning prefabricated apartment building of Bloomberg’s adAPT NYC competition, which is intended to serve as a 21st century model of New York housing. Meanwhile, SHoP Architect’s B2 Bklyn residential residential towers, currently under construction in Brooklyn, plans to be one of the world’s tallest pre-fab buildings, standing at 32 storys upon completion. via GLUCK+, World Architecture NewsFour Faces: Collider Activity Center Competition Entry / Atelier WHYUnbuilt ProjectFletcher Hotel / Benthem Crouwel ArchitectsSelected Projects Share Construction Begins on NYC’s First Prefab Steel and Concrete Residential Development Architecture News CopyAbout this authorNicky RackardAuthorFollow#TagsNewsArchitecture NewsMixed Use ArchitectureResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsResidentialPrefabricatedPeter GluckApartmentNew YorkManhattanHousingCite: Nicky Rackard. “Construction Begins on NYC’s First Prefab Steel and Concrete Residential Development ” 30 Mar 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic RoyalGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseLouvers / ShuttersTechnowoodSunshade SystemsFiber Cements / CementsRieder GroupFacade Panel – Terrazzo BlackStonesCosentinoSurfaces – Silestone® Basiq SeriesIn architectureSikaBuilding Envelope SystemsWoodLunawoodInterior ThermowoodWindowsswissFineLineSliding Windows – EvenMineral / Organic PaintsKEIMBlack Concrete – Concretal®-BlackSuspension SystemsMetawellAluminum Panels for Ceiling SailsDoorsECLISSESliding Door Opening System – ECLISSE Push&PullStonesMarini MarmiNatural Stone – Nuvolato di GréMore products »Please enable JavaScript to view thecomments powered by Disqus.Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Law enforcement discusses safety with students

first_imgLocal law enforcement responded to questions about the new dorm swipe access policy, emergency blue lights on campus, discrimination at Notre Dame and other student safety concerns during a panel hosted by student government and the Notre Dame Police Department (NDPD) in the LaFortune Ballroom on Wednesday night.Panelists included NDPD captain Rob Martinez, NDPD major George Heeter, NDPD deputy chief Steve Smith and major Steve Noonan of the St. Joseph County Police Department. Attendees were invited to submit questions through the app, Poll Everywhere, or ask them publicly using a microphone.Natalie Weber | The Observer Multiple questions centered around whether NDPD has considered increasing the number of blue light phone systems, which are mainly located on the perimeter of Notre Dame’s campus. There are about 65 blue light emergency stations on campus currently, Martinez said. Smith said there has been discussion about increasing the number of blue lights, but currently, they are not used very frequently.“I think folks know where they are, and they know they can utilize them anytime they want, but to be quite honest, very few calls … are actually coming through those devices,” Smith said. “So if there is a need to increase [blue light emergency stations], we would certainly do that, but again we don’t get a lot of information or a lot of requests for service through those.”Several attendees also raised questions about safety following the implementation of the new dorm swipe access policy, which restricts students’ swipe access to their own dorms. Questions raised were concerns about people allowing strangers into their dorms, and attendees asked if there were any policies in the works to address this issue.Smith said he doesn’t know of any pending policies yet that are to be implemented in the dorms soon.“The one thing I would suggest is make sure you never leave a door propped open,” Smith said. “That’s been an issue in the past. … We encourage you not to do that, because it invites folks to come on in anytime they want. So to the extent that you can, I would ask that you monitor who comes in and not necessarily just let anybody in.”In response, one attendee submitted a question, raising concerns that women in particular might not feel comfortable turning away men who come to their dorms. The question asked if “full-time clerks” could be implemented in dorms to monitor who enters and exits.“That would be a great solution,” Smith said. “However, I think trying to staff an entrance like that is challenging.”Smith said NDPD has also considered installing cameras at the entrances of dorms to keep track of who comes into the dorm.“It’s early on in those discussions, but that is something that could help mitigate some of that,” he said. “And I understand it’s challenging. So what I would recommend, again, is getting to know your officers in the building. If there’s certain times of day that this is becoming an issue, let your officers know. Make them aware of that, and we can set extra patrols during that time.”In response, a student asked why the dorm swipe access policy was implemented, and suggested tracking students’ entrance to dorms with ID cards would be easier than other proposed safety solutions.“I think the University would have a perfect solution to address that issue, but it is very challenging to utilize a card so that every single person has to go through and that access is recorded, so we have documentation of that,” Smith said. “Again, that comes down to a University decision.”Martin added that the policy mirrored what other schools have enacted.“There was some benchmarking done on the process,” he said. “They’ve also been following some other universities that have actually implemented this policy.One question asked about how NDPD would response to racist slurs and threats to students of color on campus, especially in light of threats to minority students at Syracuse. NDPD is also investigating reports of “biased slurs” directed toward students Friday and Saturday that sparked a protest against hate speech.“Obviously, that’s something we want folks to report to us,” Smith said. “If you see behavior like that, or you learn of behavior like that, we want to know about it right away.”In response to a question about discrimination against LGBTQ students, law enforcement also encouraged students to report incidents to the police.Smith also discussed options for students who report sexual assault to law enforcement.“You have the option of saying ‘I want Notre Dame Police Department and the investigative team in Notre Dame Police Department to investigate that,’” he said. “Or, in St. Joseph County, we also have a Special Victims Unit … and as a student, you have the option of opting for them to investigate that crime as well.”When asked about safety in South Bend, Noonan recommended traveling in groups and being aware of one’s location. He also explained the situations that generally give rise to violence in South Bend.“Generally that violence is directed for a variety of reasons,” he said. “Sometimes it’s gang activity, sometimes a social media post can trigger violence. … The best thing for students is to stay in a group [and] always know where you’re going.”Heeter offered similar advice.“Know your surroundings, [there’s] strength in numbers, so always be with a group of other individuals,” he said.Tags: NDPD, St Joseph County Police, Student government, student safety summitlast_img read more

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Board to meet November 30

first_imgBoard to meet November 30 November 15, 2001 Regular News A discussion on multidisciplinary and multijurisdictional practices, the annual audit report of Bar finances, and the last of this year’s two-year cycle procedural rule amendments will be among the items addressed by the Bar Board of Governors at its November 30 meeting. Governors will also take up again an appeal of an ethics opinion on advance funding, make a variety of appointments, and hear a report from the Family Law Section on its activities. The board will be having one of its periodic out-of-state meetings, this time in Atlanta. More than 900 Florida Bar members practice in the greater Atlanta area, and a reception, sponsopred by the Out-of-State Practioners Division, is planned to give those lawyers a chance to meet with board members. State Bar of Georgia President Jimmy Franklin and members of that bar’s Executive Committee will be attending the meeting, and a panel discussion is planned with members of both groups on the multidisciplinary and multijurisdictional practice issues. The Florida Bar has been a leader in the effort to block the establishment or growth of MDPs, while the Georgia bar is considering what position to take on that issue. The Florida Bar is studying the MJP issue, which is concerned about when it is proper for out-of-state attorneys to handle legal issues and related topics, including disciplinary questions. The Criminal Procedure Rules, Workers’ Compensation Rules, and Code and Rules of Evidence committees will present their two-year cycle rule amendments to the board for its review. That will complete the initial year of the new biennial rule cycle process, which has the procedural rules committees presenting amendments every other year, instead of the previous four-year cycle, and half of the committees presenting their changes in any given year. The Audit Committee will present the findings of the Bar’s outside auditors on the fiscal 2000-01 year operations, along with any recommendations from the auditors. That fiscal year ended June 30. The board will revisit Proposed Advisory Opinion 00-3 from the Professional Ethics Committee, which addresses advance funding companies. Those companies offer to loan money to personal injury clients secured only by expected winnings. The PAO 00-3 holds it is ethical for attorneys to tell clients about advance funding companies and, if the client gives written consent after consultation, to share confidential information with a funding company. An early version of the opinion also held that lawyers could issue letters of protection to the funding company, but the final version omitted that. It did say a lawyer could honor such a letter executed by a client. Some board members, at their October meeting, expressed reservations about the ethics of advance funding companies and the interest rates charged. Others said while some companies might be unsavory, it was not the lawyers’ duty to prevent clients from entering into such agreements. The board tabled the issue so members could review earlier drafts of PAO 00-3. Family Law Section Chair Norman Levin is scheduled to present the section’s annual report to the board. He is also expected to meet with the Disciplinary Procedure Committee over a planned revision to Rule 4-1.8(i), which prohibits an attorney from obtaining an interest in the client’s property which is subject to the cause of action. The DPC is considering an amendment to clarify that lawyers may not obtain a mortgage on client’s property, which would include property being divided in a divorce. The Family Law Section’s Executive Council has voted to oppose that, saying it would make it harder for some clients to obtain lawyers. The council also has gone on record in favor of allowing lawyers to get a percentage of property divided in a divorce as a way to improve access to the justice system. Appointments to be made include: • One lawyer from the federal Northern District of Florida for a four-year term on the 11th Circuit Judicial Conference. • One lawyer for a two-year term on the Greater Orlando Area Legal Services, Inc., Board of Directors. • Five lawyers, one from each district court of appeal jurisdiction, for two-year terms on the Florida Realtor-Attorney Joint Committee. • One lawyer for a three-year term on the Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc., Board of Directors. The complete agenda can be found at the Bar’s website, www.FLABAR.org.center_img Board to meet November 30last_img read more

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Argentina settles football coach Sampaoli’s exit terms

first_imgMoscow, July 15 : The Argentine Football Association (AFA) has settled the terms of exit of their head coach Jorge Sampaoli following the national team’s disappointing performance at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia.The AFA will pay Sampaoli $2 million for early termination of his duties instead of the $20 million indicated in his contract which was initially valid until 2020, Sputnik news agency quoted daily sports newspaper Ole as reporting on Sunday.The 58-year-old specialist took charge of the South American giants in May 2017 with the two-time champions struggling to qualify for the World Cup.After an underwhelming qualification campaign, Argentina managed to set off to Russia, where the team scraped into the knockout stage with a 2-1 win over Nigeria only to be sent home after losing 3-4 to France.In June, the media reported that the Argentina players unanimously voted for Sampaoli to be sacked as the team’s head coach after they were held to a 1-1 draw by Iceland and thrashed 0-3 by Croatia in their opening World Cup games. IANSlast_img read more

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Former cricketer Sunnette Viljoen bags silver in javelin at Olympics

first_imgFormer South Africa Women allrounder Sunnette Viljoen, who has played one Test and 17 ODIs, created history on Thursday by bagging a silver medal in the women’s javelin final of the Rio Olympics.Viljoen, 33, finished second behind Croatia’s Sara Kolak, with her best throw of 64.92 metres compared to Kolak’s 66.18 metres. Viljoen’s medal was the ninth for South Africa who are currently placed 34th overall with one gold, six silvers and two bronze medals.She had come agonisingly close to winning a medal at the London 2012 Olympics but finished fourth with a best throw of 64.53 metres, behind Germany’s Linda Stahl, who finished third with 64.91.Viljoen played her only Test against India in March 2002 in Paarl, scoring 17 and 71. She had made her ODI debut in 2000 and finished her ODI career two years later with 198 runs and five wickets.(ESPN Cricinfo)last_img read more

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