Sunday blog: Let’s get to the main point. How much did the ERIP cost us?

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Thank you for your input. +23 Vote up Vote down stop bullying · 334 weeks ago I don’t understand why our district seems so worried about giving these numbers. Several school districts have a similar plan. The problem became when teachers and smart ones figured out it was a way to double dip. They were actually getting paid what they deserved. But then the idea of replacing with younger new teachers went out the window. No fault of the district when You have a chance to hire experience. The third question should be is how Many double dippers has the district hired? Everyone has a job. The district, the board and Tracy with the cow. He keeps the public informed. This was a classic bullying job by Roth backed by central office. You have a responsibility to be transparent and keep the voters and members of the community informed. Kudos to Tracy for sticking up for what is right..changes need to be made downtown. They may want to fix that before asking the community to approve a mill levy. Report Reply 0 replies · active 334 weeks ago +10 Vote up Vote down Just Wondering… · 334 weeks ago The real question to be asked is how much adding administrators to the original ERIP has ended up costing the district? Teachers settled for no pay raise many times because they were told they would be getting it in the end, in the form of the ERIP. They got it in the end, alright! Meanwhile, administrators, who were not included in the original ERIP, still received raises AND the ERIP. Just how much did adding administrators to the ERIP cost this district? The difference between what administrators and teachers cost the district is the real story behind the ERIP. Report Reply 0 replies · active 334 weeks ago +10 Vote up Vote down Harold Gaines · 334 weeks ago Don’t let it get you Cueball; if nobody’s upset, you probably aren’t really “doing” journalism. However, the uproar does seem silly in this case. Report Reply 0 replies · active 334 weeks ago +2 Vote up Vote down JustMe · 334 weeks ago “could have put as much as $10 million “….COULD have cost. Careful Cue. Those kind of “could haves” will send people into a frenzy. We look to you for factual information. But throwing something like that into the pool full of piranha could easily backfire. Report Reply 0 replies · active 334 weeks ago +10 Vote up Vote down math major · 334 weeks ago Just me I think he qualified that estimate with a response but when the source doesn’t want to give the actual numbers aren’t we all left to guessing? ?? Report Reply 0 replies · active 334 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Open Records · 334 weeks ago Cue – Please tell me you’ve submitted open record requests for this information… All of the questions you’ve posed can probably be answered with a little research. Report Reply 0 replies · active 334 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! 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Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Commentary by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — Have you ever had someone try to pick a fight with you over a subject for which you are in complete agreement?A couple of school board members felt intent to inform the public (among other things) on Thursday about what a good job everyone did with the negotiated teachers contract agreement and the phasing out of the ERIP despite what that lousy no-good Sumner Newscow says.If a few of these board members could put aside their collective paranoia schizophrenia for one second, they will probably see they wouldn’t get an argument from me on that issue.The most recent negotiating teams have had the thankless job of slowly bringing this costly piece of policy to termination. They didn’t eliminate it abruptly, and tried to fulfill their obligation to the older teachers in the process. It was a no win situation, especially with so many unsustainable promises to teachers in yesteryear. They probably handled it as well as they could.What has been lost in the whole brouhaha, is how expensive the ERIP has been to the taxpayers of USD 353 District. Dale Dennis, Kansas State Department of Education Deputy Secretary, told Sumner County in 2011-12 USD 353 was paying $512,746 and in 12-13 it was paying $450,860 in early retirement funds (see story here).I took a calculator to this and if you added up the years since 1992 when the program was implemented, the USD 353 school district could have put as much as $10 million into the program. One could argue that more money has been paid in early retirement than the building of the new high school at this point in time. And that is without the help of state aid.Of course, there are a lot of variables to those figures, and we are looking at only one side of the accounting ledger.  I’m sure the school district wasn’t paying as much in the early going as it took the number of retirees to accumulate. Therefore the school district probably didn’t get up to the $450,000 figures until later in the 1990s.Also, the question of the amount of savings USD 353 made by replacing teachers on the top of the salary schedule with new teachers has never been answered.My intent with the ERIP story from the beginning was to ask these two simple questions:1) How much did the ERIP program cost the taxpayers of USD 353 during its duration?2) How many retirees participated in the program from its inception to now?If someone can help me answer those questions, I’d be greatly appreciated.last_img read more

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The end for Garde? Aston Villa, Norwich and Newcastle unlucky relegation frontrunners – Coral Daily Download

first_imgSimon Clare joins the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast to round up the latest sporting odds.Having brought you the latest on the title race yesterday, Coral’s PR director brings us the odds with the battle against relegation hotting up.Aston Villa face a crucial game against relegation rivals Norwich at the weekend, can they boost their chances with only thier third win of the season?Villa, who are ten points away from safety, are 1/50 to go down, with Norwich 11/10 and Newcastle, who suffered a blow with a 3-0 defeat to Everton on Wednesday, also 11/10.Coral is the official betting partner of the Alan Brazil Sports Breakfastlast_img read more

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Ohio River clean-up event

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio Soil and Water Conservations Districts (SWCD) will be joining the efforts of the Living Lands and Waters (LL&W) crew for the 2016 Ohio River Tour of river cleanups on Tuesday, August 2 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. SWCD staff and volunteers from the public are meeting at the Covington Landing at 1 Madison Avenue, Covington, KY 41011 as the starting location for the cleanup.LL&W will be in Cincinnati from July 27 to August 6 hosting two cleanups per day along the Ohio River.  Interested volunteers must sign a waiver and sign up on their website in order to participate: http://livinglandsandwaters.org/2016-ohio-river-cleanups/The SWCD Ohio River Cleanup Day is Aug. 2, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. starting at Covington Landing – 1 Madison Avenue, Covington, KY 41011.Living Lands & Waters aids in the protection, preservation and restoration of the natural environment of the nations’ major rivers and their watersheds; expands awareness of environmental issues and responsibility encompassing the river; and creates a desire and an opportunity for stewardship and responsibility for a cleaner river environment.last_img read more

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NREL launches electrification futures study series

The Electrification Futures Study examines U.S. scenarios with widespread electrification in all sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation. Credit: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Provided by National Renewable Energy Laboratory Lighting the world—electrification strategies for Sub-Saharan Africa Citation: NREL launches electrification futures study series (2018, January 9) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-nrel-electrification-futures-series.html What end-use electric technologies are available for the highest energy-consuming services today, and how might the technologies advance over time? How might widespread electrification impact national and regional electricity demand and consumption patterns? How would the U.S. electricity system need to transform to meet changes in demand from an electrified economy? What role might demand-side flexibility play to support reliable operations of a clean electricity grid? What are potential costs, benefits, and impacts of mass electrification?”With significant improvements in electric technologies—particularly in electric vehicles but also in other sectors—we’ve seen a dramatic increase in interest in electrification from electric utilities, equipment manufacturers, and others,” said Trieu Mai, NREL senior researcher and principal investigator of the study. “Widespread electrification could have major energy, economic, and environmental impacts to the entire U.S. power system and broader economy. In this study, we plan to quantify some of these impacts.”NREL has just released the first in the series of reports under the study, Electrification Futures Study: End-Use Electric Technology Cost and Performance Projections through 2050.This report uses a combination of recently published literature and expert assessment to develop future cost and performance projections for end-use electric technologies, including light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicles, and residential and commercial heat pumps.Three advancement trajectories, spanning a large but plausible range given historical trends and innovation possibilities, are developed for each end-use technology considered for the transport and buildings sectors. The report also provides a comprehensive assessment of the literature on industrial electrotechnologies and highlights significant research gaps for that sector.Electrification Futures Scenario Analysis Slated for Spring 2018Data from the End-Use Electric Technology Cost and Performance Projections through 2050 report, is available on the Electrification Futures Study website. The data will be used in the Electrification Futures Study scenario analysis, which will explore the extent of end-use technology adoption, energy and electricity consumption patterns, and supply-side futures under different levels of electrification. Ultimately, these electric technology cost and performance projections will be used to estimate the range of incremental costs and fuel use in the electrification scenarios to be examined in future publications.”Beyond our use, we hope the technology projections and literature review presented in this first report will be an informative source for R&D managers, planners, and researchers interested in electrification technologies,” said lead author Paige Jadun, energy analyst in NREL’s Strategic Energy Analysis Center. The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is spearheading the Electrification Futures Study, a research collaboration to explore the impacts of widespread electrification in all U.S. economic sectors—commercial and residential buildings, transportation, and industry. Over the next two years, NREL and its research partners—Electric Power Research Institute, Evolved Energy Research, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Northern Arizona University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory—will use a suite of modeling tools to develop and assess electrification scenarios designed to answer the following questions: This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further read more

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