Family believes no foul play involved in Montrose man’s death

first_imgBy Jemima HolmesThe family of a recently deceased ex-fisherman has indicated that they do not believe the man died as a result of foul play. This statement comes after questions were raised as to the circumstances surrounding the elderly man’s death.Dead is Sanchara Kawall, also known as “Basil” of Seawall Road Montrose, East Coast Demerara. Reports are the man may have been intoxicated when he slipped and fell into the trench that is just outside the shack in which he resided. Guyana Times spoke with the man’s daughter, Samantha Mahabal, who expressed that the dead man’s relatives do not suspect foul play as they are not aware of any valuables that he might have had, nor was anything missing from the man’s home.Dead: Sanchara “Basil” Kawall“I don’t know is what, but like he de drunk and fall in the trench,” the distraught woman shared. Mahabal noted that she has known her father to be a drinker for as long as she can remember but the habit worsened when his wife passed away some three decades ago.The elderly man who was once a fisherman had stopped working a number of years ago but would usually assist a friend of his with vending at the Plaisance Market. The man who was described as “quiet” and “good” was known for his hefty drinking habits. Relatives of Kawall told Guyana Times that the man would get by on food from his daughter and monies that he received from a son living overseas.Mahabal noted that suspicions were raised when a neighbour went to take food for the man on Friday morning. However, the neighbour was greeted by the man’s radio and a hat on the ground. “It was very strange that it left so cause he really like listening to the radio. He does sit down and listen to the radio all the time,” she told this publication. The woman went on to say that she was subsequently informed of the man’s disappearance and the search began.At around 13:00h, those in search of the man noticed a piece of fabric floating in the trench near his home and his daughter was summoned to identify the body. “Is just a piece of fabric they see and they call me to confirm is he,” she stated.Mahabal mentioned that the last time she saw her father was on Thursday. However, reports are that neighbours saw the man sitting on the bank of the trench outside of his home at around 19:00h on Thursday night. These reports are what led persons to believe the man was intoxicated when he fell into the trench and subsequently drowned.The Police have visited the family in order to collect statements and a post-mortem examination is expected to be conducted during the upcoming week.last_img read more

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SA scientist wins US research grant

first_img3 October 2012 The University of Cape Town’s Professor Valerie Mizrahi was one of only 13 science researchers in the world to receive a Senior International Research Scholar (SIRS) award from American non-profit organisation Howard Hughes Medical Institute last week. The opportunity to mentor young scientists falls under the institute’s new initiative, the International Early Career Scientist Programme, which provides funding for a select group of scientists who are in the early stages of their careers and working outside the United States. It was launched earlier this year. “What inspired me is the focus on mentoring early career scientists,” Mizrahi said. “That’s where my passion is and that’s what I want to throw my energy into.” Mizrahi has won numerous other awards through the course of her work, including the 2000 UNESCO-L’Oreal for Women in Science, the 2006 Distinguished Woman Scientist Award from the Science and Technology Department and the Order of the Mapungubwe: Silver for contributions to biochemistry and molecular biology in the country. She was also elected into the Fellowship of the American Academy of Microbiology and given an ‘A’ rating by the National Rearch Foundation in 2009. SAinfo reportercenter_img Mizrahi is the director of the Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine at UCT and is studying the organism that causes human tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The institute looks to understand metabolic flexibility and identify vulnerabilities within the disease in order to discover new drugs to combat the disease.Furthering biomedical research The Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s (HHMI) International Programme supports scientists working in countries outside the United States where further basic biomedical research can be furthered. The SIRS programme is the latest of the institute’s policies to assist scientists around the world and aims to strengthen the global network of biomedical researchers. Each senior research scholar will receive an annual grant of US$100 000 for five years and will get the opportunity to present their research at HHMI, which will facilitate the exchange of new ideas, stimulate research and allow for collaboration. “These senior international research scholars are world leaders in their research areas. They will complement our efforts to support international early career scientists in a positive way,” HHMI’s vice president and chief scientific officer, Jack Dixon, said in a statement.Mentoring the next generation of scientists “Scientific research is a global endeavour, and these grants will provide an opportunity for these highly creative and accomplished scientists to explore new avenues of biomedical research and to mentor promising early career scientists across the world,” said HHMI president, Robert Tjian.last_img read more

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Digital Health Care: Vendors Entering Honeypot Market Attempt not to get Stung

first_imgThe driver behind the growth in health care is the pressure to innovate new therapies and drugs, as well as pressure from regulators and the public to streamline costs while still keeping the quality of health care high. The digital health care market is growing fast, almost 28 percent annually, according to Grand View Research. Grand View Research: US Digital Health Care Market In the first half of 2019, ‘digital health company’ startups raised $4.2 billion in 180 funding deals in the first half of 2019, according to Rock Health. While startups abound, success is elusive. The health care industry is a difficult industry to get started in and excel. Medicine is complex; regulation is intense; and politics are inescapable.center_img Jeff Immelt, former chairman and CEO of GE and now venture partner at New Enterprise Associates, said that “there are so many dead home healthcare companies. The graveyards are full of them. The next graveyard is going to be filled with AI companies if they don’t find a way to embed their technology into these systems.” David Uffer, a partner at Alira Health, said that “digital health care itself is a problematic market. Business models in digital health are hard to figure out. There’s a difference between wellness and healthcare, and there’s always a tug-of-war with insurance companies over who is going to pay for services.” The application of new technology to the health care industry, along with new ideas about how to apply and deliver treatment are what health care providers and vendors in the industry are focusing on.last_img read more

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