Students propose donating used apps to charity

first_img Tagged with: christmas corporate Digital Howard Lake | 21 November 2012 | News As you’ll see the ‘advert’ suggests a short Christmas campaign in which iPhone users are encouraged to donate their unwanted apps. For each app donated (and presumably deleted), the students propose that Apple would donate the value of that app to The Salvation Army.It’s an intriguing idea, although it does have one weakness. Why would Apple pay the full price, including its original share of the app purchase price? Does ‘donating’ an app help Apple commercially? It doesn’t seem to, so it becomes a less attractive CSR proposition.Is there an alternative in which people could donate their unwanted apps to a friend, who has to make a donation in order to acquire it? Again, that might not work due to the various digital rights elements of apps, especially now it becomes clear that none of us have the right to transfer the music we’ve bought in our Apple iTunes library to anyone else, even after our death.Still, the Miami Ad School students have made a good start in working out how charities can try to benefit from the used app market. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Students propose donating used apps to charitycenter_img  16 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis How do you donate digital content? That issue is going to become more of a problem for charities that rely on donations of items such as books and music CDs which are being produced as digital items.And what about apps on mobile phones? They have a value and a lifespan, so after a while you end up with apps that you just don’t need or use. And the value is immense: currently people are spending $4.3 billion in Apple iOS apps a year.Students at the Miami Ad School addressed that question in a project and came up with the Apple Donation box. The video above is a proof of concept: it is not a genuine service and does not have the backing of Apple or The Salvation Army. Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Diamond life in the Desmond Complex | Newcastle West Feature

first_imgAdvertisement NewsCommunityDiamond life in the Desmond Complex | Newcastle West FeatureBy Rose Rushe – October 12, 2019 348 WhatsApp Facebook Email Linkedincenter_img Twitter Print Desmond Complex, Newcastle West, Limerick. Photo: Cian ReinhardtFLOOR  to ceiling glass walls, a huge common room for bingo, dancing and courting, a restaurant with 60 covers in the day, rooms for hire by local services; gardens, a creche and playground on site: the Desmond Complex means business.Manager Aileen Harnett took us through this happy campus on a sun-drenched day on which the centre pulsed with life.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Built in response to a feasibility study in 1990s that showed a lack of support services for older people, since 1996, it is community led and owned. Limerick Citizens Information Services run morning clinics here Tuesday to Friday; Pobal and HSE are other stakeholders. Naturally, the Complex is a not for profit company.“With the aid of Local Link we share the cost of transport for older people and disabled people  from the wider West Limerick area.” Access and affordability are everything. Just €10 secures entry to all entertainment for the over 55s, pastoral services with Sisters Rena and Marie (Poor Servants of the Mother of God), sociability and a three-course meal, freshly cooked.“We have our day centre every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.  We have a lovely building and rent out rooms to local services. Citizens Information Services is here four mornings a week, from 10.30am into 2pm.“There is a Mother and Toddler group going on upstairs as I speak and we have loads of different activities going on – right now a coffee morning that is an annual fundraiser for Milford Hospice. It has raised €1,000′.The Desmond Community Creche is part of the one company and “very well supported. It is full and caters to all the schemes with a capacity for 110 children.”Across the yard stands the Brothers of Charity Early Intervention building. The Brothers rent the Hawthorne Suite five days in the principal building also to meet the needs of the community they foster.Business minded, the Desmond Complex hires space to private enterprise as well such as CareBright, slimming groups, Safe Pass training and even birthday parties on Sunday (self catered).“In the dining room we fit 80 seated and on a weekly basis, we comfortably provide for at least 160 meals.” Bernie Forrestal heads up the kitchen team and the food aromas circulating are delicious.Professional musicians set up in the common room with their own PA “and it is a very lively spot.” Aileen laughs. “We have joke tellers, we have singers, poetry speakers, a great varied group of people to entertain and have fun – and there is great dancing.” Folks, check out their Sloshy [line dancing].Late blooming romance? “Yes, it has been known to happen.” Again, that big bright smile from someone in love with their own lucky, lively job and diamond life at the Desmond Complex. Previous articleFILM REVIEW: JokerNext articleLimerick Councillor claims Gardaí “squaring” minor offences “often done” to maintain good relationship with public Rose Rushehttp://www.limerickpost.ieCommercial Features and Arts Editor at Limerick Postlast_img read more

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