Se aceptan candidaturas para representantes laicos en el Consejo Ejecutivo

first_img Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Abril 13, del 2016] Hasta el 1 de mayo, se aceptan nominaciones para servir como miembro laico en el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal.El Rev. Canónigo Michael Barlowe, Secretario Ejecutivo de la Convención General, anunció que la vacante fue creada por la renuncia del miembro del Consejo Ejecutivo José Ferrell de la Diócesis de Carolina del Norte, cuyo mandato concluye en la Convención General del 2018.Barlowe indicó que puesto que la vacante fue creada por un laico, las nominaciones se deben hacer del orden laico. Explicó: “De conformidad con las Reglas de Orden, el Comité Ejecutivo del Consejo Ejecutivo examinará todas las sugerencias, y serán designados al menos dos y no más de cinco candidatos. La elección por todo el Consejo Ejecutivo tendrá lugar en nuestra reunión de junio”.Barlowe observó que los candidatos deben estar dispuestos a asistir en las próximas reuniones del Consejo Ejecutivo: octubre 20-22; febrero 6-8 del 2017;  junio 9-11 del 2017; octubre 18-21 del 2017; enero 22-24 del 2018; abril 21-23 del 2018.Las nominaciones se deben enviar a Barlowe a [email protected] para el 1 de mayo con una biografía de 150 palabras y una fotografía digital.Como se indica en el sitio web: El Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal es un órgano elegido que representa a toda la Iglesia. En el curso de tres años entre las convenciones, conocido como el “trienio”, el Consejo Ejecutivo se reúne habitualmente una vez en cada una de las nueve provincias de la Iglesia Episcopal.El Consejo Ejecutivo tiene la obligación de llevar a cabo los programas y las políticas adoptadas por la Convención General. La función del Consejo Ejecutivo es supervisar el ministerio y la misión de la Iglesia. El Consejo Ejecutivo está compuesto por veinte miembros elegidos por la Convención General (cuatro obispos, cuatro sacerdotes o diáconos y doce laicos) y dieciocho miembros elegidos por los sínodos provinciales. Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Executive Council Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska center_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Posted Apr 13, 2016 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Se aceptan candidaturas para representantes laicos en el Consejo Ejecutivo Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

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Kids, defined by income

first_imgThe chasm between the rich and poor has distressed world leaders as both a moral failure and a growing threat to global economic and political stability. In a bold statement last fall, Pope Francis sharply criticized what he saw as the excesses of capitalism, while President Obama called the historic level of wealth disparity and lack of economic mobility in the United States “the defining challenge of our time.”Just as income trend lines for affluent and poor Americans have dramatically diverged over the last 40 years, so too have the educational achievement rates of their children. Today, residential segregation by income means that public schools with high rates of low-income students face spiraling challenges to prepare children for a workforce that demands high-level skills.Research shows that while the correlation between parental education and child achievement has remained fairly stable since the 1960s, the relationship between parental income and child achievement has tightened, with income — rather than race — now a strong predictor of student success.In “Restoring Opportunity: The Crisis of Inequality and the Challenge for American Education” (Harvard Education Press), Richard J. Murnane, Thompson Professor of Education and Society at Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), and Greg J. Duncan, distinguished professor at the University of California, Irvine’s School of Education, examine how income inequality affects students and schools.The book focuses on three innovative institutions that have taken steps to counteract the achievement burdens that wealth disparity places on schools and students: a pre-K school in Boston, a high school in Brooklyn, and a University of Chicago charter school. All have high academic standards, provide substantial and ongoing support for students and teachers, and maintain common-sense systems of accountability. While unusual, the authors say, the philosophies and practices at these schools could serve as models for change at other schools with similar populations.“It can be done. It is not impossible to educate even high concentrations of low-income children well,” Murnane said Thursday evening during an Askwith Forum in HGSE’s Longfellow Hall.Duncan and Murnane spoke about their work and offered some strategic interventions they called “sensible accountability” that schools can adopt. The talk also featured a panel discussion with Martha Minow, Ed.M. ’76, the Morgan and Helen Chu Dean and Professor at Harvard Law School; Clarence Page, a Pulitzer Prize-winning syndicated columnist for the Chicago Tribune; and Paul Reville, the Francis Keppel Professor of Practice of Educational Policy and Administration at HGSE and the former Massachusetts secretary of education.Given the increasingly complex skills that students must master to succeed in today’s workforce, Duncan and Murnane suggest, schools need to deliver better instruction and learning opportunities, and be rightfully held to higher achievement standards. But too often, teachers and school leaders are not getting the adequate training and support to make those goals a reality.“At the very time that we’re upping the ante on schools and what they have to do, we’re creating conditions in those schools that make them harder and harder to teach those skills,” Duncan said.Numerous past efforts to address the inadequacies of many public schools, such as more per-pupil spending or the creation of charter schools, have failed to consistently slow the trends of the last few decades.Just as average per-pupil spending in public schools continues to vary widely among communities and states, so does the amount spent on student enrichment outside of school. In 1972-1973, wealthy parents spent $2,857 more per child than low-income parents to supplement learning; in 2005-2006, wealthy parents spent $7,993 more per child, according to the book.While money and how it’s spent matter, Minow noted, that’s not enough. Research shows that rich and poor students spend equal time looking at computer screens, but their skills from that engagement are not equal, she said.“The difference is not time on screens, the difference is access to adults and coaches, and are you in a community with other people who help you as you navigate, whether it’s educational stuff or it’s games or whatever,” said Minow. “That’s the difference, and that’s reflected in those [parental] expenditures.”Minow and Page agreed that one major obstacle to implementing any new idea to improve education broadly is overcoming the public’s disappointment with past reform efforts that simply haven’t delivered on their promises.“I think the danger is there’s this constant effort in school reform to find the magic bullet, the one thing that’s going to fix things,” Minow said, praising Duncan and Murnane’s emphasis on “sustained intervention,” not a quick fix. “Nothing is sustained; there’s no long-term anything.”“The fact is that we’re talking about some deeply rooted problems,” Page said.“Everybody wants better schools. There’s a consensus nationally that we need to improve our schools, that we need to save education,” he said. “There is also a universal disdain for paying for improving schools. However, if we show that change is possible, that change can happen, and can work,” then he thinks we can find “consensus for change.”last_img read more

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Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railway files abandonment notice for track in Maine

first_imgMontreal, Maine & Atlantic Railway (MMA) said today that it has filed a “Notice of Intent ” with the Surface Transportation Board (STB) to abandon certain of its lines. This notice is required by the STB as a preliminary step in the abandonment process. MMA continues to provide regular rail service and is continuing to work with Maine DOT in order to find a solution that would permit continued rail operations on these lines. Last summer when the company first announced it wanted to abandon some of its track, it put the value of that section at $17 million for the track and the land. MMA has an interchange in Newport, Vermont.MMA seeks to discontinue service and remove 233 miles of track in Aroostook and Penobscot counties in the state of Maine.  The possibility of an abandonment was originally announced  in August 2009. Affected lines include track serving Houlton, Presque Isle, Caribou and Fort Kent. MMA lines between Millinocket and Montreal, Brownville and Searsport, and Madawaska to Van Buren are not included in this application. MMA anticipates that the actual Application will be filed in late February and that the proceedings at the STB will take approximately 3 months to complete.MMA said it has suffered substantial operating losses on these lines in the last three years due to low shipping volume and high operating costs.MMA continues to meet with representatives of Maine in an effort to find an alternate solution that will preserve rail service in the area. Robert C. Grindrod, president of MMA, said, “We have been working closely with Maine DOT since the possibility of abandonment was first discussed. We are seeking an alternative solution and consider abandonment the last resort in a process that offers several options short of abandonment.””We will continue to seek solutions,” Grindrod said, “but we must stop the cash drain that has already and continues to undermine the financial health of the entire company. However, I want to assure our shippers that service will continue during this process, and we are hopeful that an acceptable solution can be found.”Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railway began operations in 2003 and currently operates 754 route miles of track in Maine, New Brunswick, Quebec and Vermont. It was formed when it boughtSOURCE Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railway. BANGOR, Maine, Feb. 4, 2010 /PRNewswire/ —last_img read more

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American Utility Giant Earmarks $1.8 Billion for Renewable Generation

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Magazine:American Electric Power (AEP), one of the United State’s largest power companies and one that owns a disproportionate share of coal assets, announced that it will invest $1.8 billion in new renewable energy projects during the 2018-2020 timeframe. This is nearly five times the company’s current investment in renewable energy generation by dollar value.This $1.8 billion will represent around 10% of the company’s planned capital outlays during the period, 72% of which will go to its transmission and distribution businesses. While AEP still owns 60 power plants totaling 26 GW of capacity (47% of which is coal-fired generation), in the past 10 years the company has taken a sharp turn in strategy away from investing in generation towards its transmission and distribution.Details in an AEP press release and a conference presentation are sparse. But while it appears that most of this will be wind, among the 5.57 GW of renewable energy projects identified for completion through 2025 under to serve its regulated utility businesses the company is looking at 1.37 GW of solar.AEP has also revealed that among the $1.8 billion for renewables it plans to invest $1.3 billion in projects under power contracts. These investments will be split over its AEP Onsite Partners and AEP Renewables subsidiaries, with Onsite Partners owning distributed generation and selling the power to schools, municipalities, hospitals and other commercial and industrial customers. In addition to distributed solar, Onsite Partners plans to build and own both energy storage and substations.The capacity of wind and solar assets owned by these companies are much smaller at present, together representing investments of less than $400 million. AEP Onsite Partners holds 31 MW of solar in operation and 42 MW under construction, and AEP Renewables currently owns three utility-scale wind and solar projects totaling 116 MW. The latter includes the 62 MW Boulder Solar 2 project.AEP characterizes its approach to these contracts as looking to develop fully contracted assets with strong credit counterparties, with the aim of seeking long-term, predictable cash flows. This will include specific requirements on project returns, and what it calls a “measured” approach to project risks.More: AEP to invest $1.8 billion in renewables over the next three years American Utility Giant Earmarks $1.8 Billion for Renewable Generationlast_img read more

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Alexander: Which Cal League All-Stars will become big league stars?

first_imgPreviousNorth players head to the bench in between innings of the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)Charly Quezada, 12 from Newmark Little League in San Bernardino, celebrates with friends and family after winning the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The South’s Casey Golden (center, with the Lancaster Jethawks) looks on as Charly Quezada, right, 12 from Newmark Little League in San Bernardino, is congratulated by South coach Michael Wertz (right) after he and Golden won the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsThe North’s Mark Karaviotis (Visalia Rawhide) crosses the plate in the second inning upon scoring on a triple by Jameson Hannah to give the North a 3-0 lead over the South during the 2019 Cal League All-Star Game on Tuesday night at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)Former Oakland Athletics and Upland High School baseball player Rollie Fingers throws out the first pitch prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. Fingers was also inducted into the California League Hall of Fame prior to the game. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The South’s Austin Warren (Inland Empire 66ers) signs an autograph for a fan prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)Fans scramble for a home run ball during the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)Baseball fans scramble for baseballs during the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)California League All-Stars lineup during pregame introductions at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)California League All-Stars lineup during pregame introductions at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)California League All-Stars lineup during pregame introductions at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)Bernie entertains fans during the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)Baseball fans get autographs from players prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)Baseball fans get autographs from players prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The North’s Cal Raleigh (Modesto Nuts) hits a home run during the opening round of the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The North’s Cal Raleigh (41, from the Modesto Nuts) is congratulated by teammates after his turn during the opening round of the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The North’s Cal Raleigh (41, from the Modesto Nuts) is congratulated by teammates after his turn during the opening round of the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)North players react to a home run during the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The South’s Connor Wong (Rancho Cucamonga Quakes) takes his turn during the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The South’s Casey Golden (center, with the Lancaster Jethawks) is congratulated by teammates after winning the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The South’s Casey Golden (center, with the Lancaster Jethawks) is congratulated by teammates after winning the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The South’s Casey Golden (Lancaster Jethawks) and Charly Quezada, 12 from Newmark Little League in San Bernardino, celebrate together after winning the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)Former Oakland Athletics and Upland High School baseball player Rollie Fingers was inducted into the California League Hall of Fame prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)Former Oakland Athletics and Upland High School baseball player Rollie Fingers (right), former California League President Joe Gagliardi (left) and Joe Heslet, accepting for his late father Harry “Bud” Heslet were all inducted into the California League Hall of Fame prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)South All-Star Ryan Rolison (Lancaster Jethawks) gives Nolan Lea, 8 from Hesperia, an autograph prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The South’s Austin Warren (Inland Empire 66ers) signs an autograph for a fan prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)Little Leaguers chase down balls in the outfield during the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The South’s Connor Wong (Rancho Cucamonga Quakes) walks to the plate for his turn during the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)Baseball fans scramble for baseballs during the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The South’s Casey Golden (center, with the Lancaster Jethawks) looks on as Charly Quezada, right, 12 from Newmark Little League in San Bernardino, is congratulated by South coach Michael Wertz (right) after he and Golden won the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The South’s Casey Golden (Lancaster Jethawks) and Charly Quezada, 12 from Newmark Little League in San Bernardino, celebrate together after winning the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The South’s Jeter Downs (Rancho Cucamonga Quakes) takes his at bat during the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The South’s Devin Mann (Rancho Cucamonga Quakes) takes his at bat during the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)A young baseball fan gets a better view of the the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)South pitcher Kyle Bradish (Inland Empire 66ers) brings a pitch to the plate during the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)South pitcher Kyle Bradish (Inland Empire 66ers) brings a pitch to the plate during the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)The North’s Mark Karaviotis (Visalia Rawhide) heads towards the plate in the second inning to score on Jameson Hannah’s triple to give the North a 3-0 lead over the South during the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)A pair of fans play an on field game in between innings during the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)South pitcher Ryan Rolison (Lancaster Jethawks) brings a pitch to the plate during the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)South pitcher Ryan Rolison (Lancaster Jethawks) brings a pitch to the plate during the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)South third baseman Devin Mann (Rancho Cucamonga Quakes) throws out a runner during the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)North players head to the bench in between innings of the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)Charly Quezada, 12 from Newmark Little League in San Bernardino, celebrates with friends and family after winning the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 41Charly Quezada, 12 from Newmark Little League in San Bernardino, celebrates with friends and family after winning the Home Run Derby prior to the California League All-Star Game at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino Tuesday evening June 18, 2019. (Photo by Will Lester, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)ExpandSAN BERNARDINO — Four years ago, Cody Bellinger was a California League All-Star, and he participated in the home run contest before the Cal League-Carolina League All-Star Game in Rancho Cucamonga.He didn’t win, which seems hard to believe now. Harder still: He was only the 20th-ranked prospect in the Dodgers’ farm system at the time, according to Baseball America, and that publication’s scouting report noted that some scouts figured he’d develop home run power, but others thought he might hit “10 to 15” home runs as a big leaguer, at best.We know better now. If scouting is an inexact science, so is player development.So when another Dodgers prospect, catcher Connor Wong, participated in the home run derby on Tuesday night at San Manuel Stadium and didn’t win, winding up with three homers in his only round, I made sure to point the similarity out to him. Lake Elsinore’s MacKenzie Gore, who threw a bullpen session Tuesday night but did not pitch in the game for the South, was the Padres’ No. 2 prospect going into the season – and is now presumably No. 1 with Fernando Tatis Jr. in San Diego – and was No. 3 in the magazine’s recently revised Top 100 Prospects list.In other words, barring injury, if there’s anything close to a sure thing among those players, Gore (5-1, 1.21, 0.69 WHIP) is it.Wong is the Dodgers’ No. 16 prospect, though his path to the big leagues is currently blocked by Austin Barnes on the big club, Will Smith at Triple-A and Keibert Ruiz, the organization’s No. 1 prospect, at Double-A. Jeter Downs, the shortstop acquired in last winter’s Yasiel Puig trade, is No. 13.None of the host Inland Empire 66ers’ All-Stars – pitchers Kyle Bradish and Oliver Ortega and outfielder Torii Hunter Jr., who did not play, were listed among the Angels’ top 30 prospects. Likewise, Quakes pitchers Max Gamboa, Wills Montgomerie, Logan Salow and Edwin Uceta, third baseman Devin Mann and outfielder Donovan Casey didn’t make the Dodgers’ top 30.But taking a look at minor leaguers and trying to predict stardom is sort of akin to that blindfolded swing at the piñata. Even scouts don’t always get it right, and they’re paid to make those judgments.Consider: From that 2015 Cal League-Carolina League game, 10 players out of the 42 who played in it were in the big leagues at last look. Bellinger, of course, but also pitchers Ryan McMahon (Rockies), Zack Godley (Diamondbacks), Paul Fry (Orioles), Tyler Beede (Giants) and Nick Pivetta (Phillies), catchers Kyle Farmer (Reds, also part of the Puig trade) and Omar Narvaez (Mariners) and infielders Jack Mayfield (Astros) and Johan Camargo (Braves). Twelve others have had one or several cups of coffee in the big leagues.And the crazy thing about that game, a 9-2 California victory? Bellinger was 1 for 4 with two RBIs. Quakes teammate Brandon Trinkwon was 2 for 3 with three runs scored and two RBIs and was named the game’s MVP.Two years later, the Dodgers released Trinkwon, and he’s now out of baseball.Visalia’s Mark Karaviotis was Tuesday night’s MVP after going 3 for 5 with 2 runs and 2 RBI. For his sake, let’s hope his path is [email protected]@Jim_Alexander on Twitter “That was my first one (home run contest) ever, and it was definitely really intense and stressful,” he said. “I thought I was getting some of those balls and they just weren’t going.“So if any pitchers are listening, go ahead, more fastballs, because obviously, I got no power.”With answers like that, may Connor Wong get to a big league clubhouse as soon as humanly possible.He’s a 23-year-old who was drafted out of the University of Houston in the third round in 2017, another of the Dodgers’ infielders who have been converted to catchers. He was in the top 10 in the Cal League in home runs last year with 19 and has slugged 12 in 52 games so far this year, so opposing pitchers will still focus more on what he does than what he says.Of the 56 players on the two rosters for Tuesday night’s 7-1 victory by the North, 16 were ranked in their organizations’ top 30 prospects by Baseball America as the season began. That, of course, is a tough room, since it encompasses a team’s entire farm system, and by the time the season comes around some of the top guys on the list are in the big leagues.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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