Volleyball Closes Season With Win At Illinois State

first_img Box Score (PDF) Full Schedule Roster Story Links Box Score (HTML) NORMAL, Ill. – The Drake University volleyball team closed its season in impressive fashion with a 3-1 win at Illinois State on Saturday, Nov. 19, evening.With the win, the Bulldogs finish the season with back-to-back road wins to give the team 17 wins this season, its most since 2010. Additionally, the Bulldogs’ eight Missouri Valley Conference wins are their most since 2010 and the Bulldogs swept Illinois State for the first time since 2009.”As a team we’re ecstatic about how we finished the season against one of the top teams in our conference,” said Drake head coach Darrin McBroom. “For us to beat Illinois State on their home court was huge for our team and especially our seniors. They were here when our program was at its lowest but have turned it around into a winning season.”Drake (17-15, 8-10 MVC) hit .260 in the win, including an impressive .347 in the final set with 18 kills to finish the season in style. Kyla Inderski (Urbandale, Iowa) led the Bulldogs with 18 kills and 19 digs for her 16th double-double of the season. Makena Schoene (Seattle, Wash.) added nine kills in her final game as a Bulldog while Grace Schofield (Mundelein, Ill.) had 12 kills on 33 attempts.”Kyla had a ton of kills and both right sides, Makena [Schoene] and Nicole Woods had a great night with very low error ratio,” McBroom said. “Michelle Thommi had another great night as well with a bunch of digs (17).”In her second-straight game starting, freshman Elle Tubbs (Clinton, Iowa) had another impressive showing with a team-high eight blocks to give her 17 blocks in the final two games of the season.Illinois State (16-14, 9-9 MVC) was led by Aly Dawson’s 17 kills and 15 digs as one of four Redbirds with double-figure kills.The opening set was close throughout, but Drake used a late 3-1 run to build a 20-18 lead that it would keep in winning the set, 25-23. Drake kept that momentum in the second set, opening with a 12-4 lead. The Bulldogs extended that lead to 19-9 to cruise to a 25-15 win and take a 2-0 lead in the match.The third set saw Illinois State rally to take a 21-11 lead before the Bulldogs started to chip away at that deficit with an 8-2 run to make it 23-19. Drake staved off four-straight set points to pull within two points before the Redbirds finally took the set, 25-22.Drake returned the favor in the fourth set with a 25-22 win while hitting .347 with 18 kills. The Bulldogs never trailed after taking an 8-7 lead as part of a 6-1 run in methodically taking the set from the Redbirds to win the match, 3-1.The Bulldogs are slated to return nine players next season and recently signed a group of four talented freshmen set to join the roster in 2017.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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New law to bolster police watchdog

first_img3 June 2011 New legislation will give South Africa’s Independent Complaints Directorate (ICD) – soon to become the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID) – the “teeth” it needs to tackle any criminality or misconduct by the country’s police service. This is according to ICD executive director Francois Beukman, who said the directorate’s mandate – to conduct independent and impartial investigations of alleged criminality and misconduct by the SA Police Service (SAPS) and Municipal Police Services – had been expanded by the new legislation. The Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID) legislation was recently signed into law by President Jacob Zuma. Beukman said that while previously the police would take their time in reporting matters for investigation to the ICD, with the new legislation, station commanders and police must notify the directorate of matters that need investigation immediately after they become aware of it. Police officers who fail to report incidents to the IPID as stipulated will be guilty of an offence and will be liable for a fine and even imprisonment, he added. The legislation also, for the first time, obligates SAPS management to act and respond to the IPID’s disciplinary recommendations. As things currently stand, police management are reluctant to implement the directorate’s recommendations at the conclusion of an investigation, he noted. The legislation will also sharpen the types of investigation that the directorate must carry out, Beukman said. The IPID will concentrate its investigation on: deaths in police custody and as a result of police action; any complaint relating to the discharge of an official firearm by a police officer; rape by a police officer or while in police custody; and complaints of torture or assault against police officers carrying out their duties. In addition, the IPID may investigate corruption matters within the police and any other matters referred to it. Beukman noted that the difference between the ICD and IPID is that the latter will focus on more serious crimes. The IPID will no longer have to investigate service delivery complaints against police, as this will now become matters for police management to handle. The directorate is currently dealing with about 6 000 cases, of which about 2 000 are related to service delivery. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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SA scientist wins US research grant

first_img3 October 2012 The University of Cape Town’s Professor Valerie Mizrahi was one of only 13 science researchers in the world to receive a Senior International Research Scholar (SIRS) award from American non-profit organisation Howard Hughes Medical Institute last week. The opportunity to mentor young scientists falls under the institute’s new initiative, the International Early Career Scientist Programme, which provides funding for a select group of scientists who are in the early stages of their careers and working outside the United States. It was launched earlier this year. “What inspired me is the focus on mentoring early career scientists,” Mizrahi said. “That’s where my passion is and that’s what I want to throw my energy into.” Mizrahi has won numerous other awards through the course of her work, including the 2000 UNESCO-L’Oreal for Women in Science, the 2006 Distinguished Woman Scientist Award from the Science and Technology Department and the Order of the Mapungubwe: Silver for contributions to biochemistry and molecular biology in the country. She was also elected into the Fellowship of the American Academy of Microbiology and given an ‘A’ rating by the National Rearch Foundation in 2009. SAinfo reportercenter_img Mizrahi is the director of the Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine at UCT and is studying the organism that causes human tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The institute looks to understand metabolic flexibility and identify vulnerabilities within the disease in order to discover new drugs to combat the disease.Furthering biomedical research The Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s (HHMI) International Programme supports scientists working in countries outside the United States where further basic biomedical research can be furthered. The SIRS programme is the latest of the institute’s policies to assist scientists around the world and aims to strengthen the global network of biomedical researchers. Each senior research scholar will receive an annual grant of US$100 000 for five years and will get the opportunity to present their research at HHMI, which will facilitate the exchange of new ideas, stimulate research and allow for collaboration. “These senior international research scholars are world leaders in their research areas. They will complement our efforts to support international early career scientists in a positive way,” HHMI’s vice president and chief scientific officer, Jack Dixon, said in a statement.Mentoring the next generation of scientists “Scientific research is a global endeavour, and these grants will provide an opportunity for these highly creative and accomplished scientists to explore new avenues of biomedical research and to mentor promising early career scientists across the world,” said HHMI president, Robert Tjian.last_img read more

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Joburg by taxi

first_imgGetting around Joburg on a minibus taxi can be daunting for newbies. But once you know your short right from your after robot, and your Diepsloot from your Orange Farm, it’s the fastest, most popular and often the cheapest way to get where you want to go. Minibus taxis are by far the most popular – and are often the cheapest – form of public transport in South Africa, used mainly by the urban and rural poor. (Image: Arrive Alive) • Sanlam Cape Town Marathon goes silver • South Africa’s tourism improves • Rugby’s full story: the Springbok Experience Rugby Museum • The artist at work: Mbongeni Buthelezi makes beauty out of waste • World falls in love with South African baby elephant Ray MaotaMinibus taxis are by far the most popular – and are often the cheapest – form of public transport in South Africa, used mainly by the urban and rural poor.In Johannesburg, using a taxi can be bewildering, and even frightening, if you are not from the city of gold. Here’s a quick guide to ease your way.To board a taxi in the city of Johannesburg, you must first get to the appropriate taxi rank. Here, hundreds of minibus taxis converge to ferry commuters to their various destinations in and out of Gauteng province, and even across the border to neighbouring countries.The Johannesburg CBD has four major taxi ranks: Noord Street Taxi Rank, Bree Street Taxi Rank, Wanderers Taxi Rank and Faraday Taxi Rank. At any of the four, you can get a taxi to anywhere in Gauteng, while some also cater for taxis beyond the province.Noord Street is by far the largest and busiest rank in the middle of the city. As you approach the rank, especially during peak hours, you are swarmed by hordes of hurrying commuters. You are also confronted by hawkers peddling a variety of goods, ranging from foodstuff to clothing and anything else in-between.The taxi ranks are the easiest part of your journey to navigate as there is signage and you stand in queues to board a taxi to your destination. It’s when you are not at a taxi rank that you have to be fluent in taxi sign language – there are no written signs; it’s all done by a complicated series of hand signals. And South African minibus taxis stop wherever they are needed along whatever road they are driving. They do not have designated stops; you simply have to flag one down – using the correct hand signal, of course.A language like no otherEvery day thousands of hands stretch out along commuter routes across Gauteng speaking a silent language of taxi hand signals. According to artist Susan Woolf, taxi hand signs are a shared language, learned by imitation and word of mouth.Woolf is a recognised expert in Gauteng taxi hand signs, or what is really the Gauteng dialect of what has been called South Africa’s 12th official language. She spent many years of research and artistic production focusing on the signals, documenting and deciphering them. Along the way, she has created a lexicon for blind people to comfortably use this mode of transport.“They are basic gestures tied to narrative threads that swirl through community life connecting today with history and folklore,” says Woolf.They are complex, she adds. They often have an indexical aspect in that they “point to” the place to which they refer and often use the gestural shape of a pointing finger, or a finger or hand in motion towards the place indicated. But some of the signs have iconic features of resemblance, such as the shape of the orange for T Junction, Orange Farm or KwaThema, all places in Gauteng; others have symbolic arbitrary, purely conventional qualities.Signs and destinationsAccording to Woolf, a taxi hand sign may refer to a place that has retained its indigenous name but it may just as easily refer to an event associated with it, or a physical attribute of the place, or even a shopping mall that is the main feature of a place.There are two basic signs that commuters in Johannesburg. One is the index figure pointing up, which means town; the other is the index figure pointing down, meaning local. This takes you anywhere within the suburb you are in.The KwaThema taxi hand sign is performed showing two flat hands, palms together, resting on the left side of the person’s face.The taxi hand sign to Kliptown is one hand waving left to right in front of their faces and the other hand waves up and down, to ask the taxi to slow down.The sign to Orange Farm is directly descriptive of its name. With a forward pointing hand, all four fingers and the thumb are bent upwards as if to hold an orange.The taxi sign to Diepsloot is acted out with one hand in a sequence of hand postures, dipping downwards and then upwards in a forward movement several times.If you want to get to Fourways, in Johannesburg, just hold up your hand with four fingers exposed and your thumb tucked in.Taxi lingoBut it’s not only the hand signals that are important. There are also phrases you’ll need to understand, such as “short right”, “short left”, “after robot” and “dankie”.They might sound confusing but they are literal meanings of where the passenger wants to alight.Short right means you want to get off at the next street to the right and vice-versa with short left.After robot means you want to get off after the next traffic light the taxi goes through.Here, or dankie, which actually means “thank you” in Afrikaans, has been the subject of many squabbles between driver and passenger. Many taxi drivers feel it’s too ambiguous. They prefer a passenger to be specific, for example “after robot”.last_img read more

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Low to negative margins driving hog industry

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Ben Brown, Program Manager for the Ohio State University Farm Management ProgramRallies in grain markets, especially soybean meal, have increased feed costs for hog producers that did not lock in contracts when prices were low. Higher input costs along with a decline in pork prices erased many of the margins hog producers experienced in the first quarter of 2018, but prices rebounded in May. Large increases in hog production in Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Nebraska have contributed to the low prices. The national average for fed hog prices was $52.50 in January but fell to $45.3 by April. Prices have rallied in recent weeks, but still below 2017 levels at this same period. Prices reached a peak in July of 2017 at $67.30. Markets for the nearby July futures contract signal horizontal movements in price. Current prices would suggest a per head return of $2 to $5 as a national average for 2018. With higher feed costs expected in 2019, negative margins could return.Exports to international markets will be a large factor in the hog outlook. Exports of U.S. pork were lowered 35 million pounds in the May WASDE report on concerns around Chinese demand. With the implementation of a 25% tariff on U.S. pork, exports to China have lagged. Increased exports to emerging markets like South Korea and the Dominican Republic will be important in offsetting decreases to China and increased domestic supply. Exports make up roughly 22% of U.S. pork production with the largest markets being Mexico and Japan. However, U.S. pork exports to Mexico decreased in the first quarter of 2018, substituted by large amounts of turkey imports. The USDA forecasts even higher pork production in 2018. The key question will be levels of domestic and international consumption of pork with competition from potential substitutes like beef and poultry. If China backs away from U.S. pork, negative margins could return in as early as this year.last_img read more

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Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast, August 30, 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Moisture is pushing off to the east and south this morning as a cold front attempts to clear the area. We should see dry air overspread the state through the rest of today and tomorrow behind that cold front. Temps will be a couple of degrees cooler today and tomorrow, but the biggest noticeable feature will be lower relative humidity. Overall, it will be a nice change from the past few days.  Our next chance of rain is back for the weekend. Winds shift to the south on the backside of high pressure later tomorrow, and that will bring warm, unstable air back in across the eastern corn belt. While it there may not be a dramatic amount rain heading towards us, we do think that the best set up for rain looks to be still in northern parts of Ohio over the entire weekend. While we don’t want to completely rule out spotty showers in southern Ohio, the true focal point is farther north. In fact, a recent model run has tried to push the action even farther north, affecting mostly Michigan, Lake Erie and southern Ontario, but we are not going to go that far, and will not change our forecast that dramatically on one model run only. So, keep an eye out for scattered weekend action, and we are pulling the top end of our range down a bit, looking for a tenth up to .75” with 50% coverage from I-70 northward.  Monday should be dry. However, from there we still are rather unsettled. We will keep scattered showers in the forecast for Tuesday and Wednesday, and likely have to increase chances of moisture for Thursday and Friday. Some models are trying to go drier for that Tuesday and Wednesday period. While we won’t rule that out, we are going more conservative and will be slow to remove moisture from the window for now. We will revisit this through this afternoon and tonight, and if the forecast needs tweaking, we will do it tomorrow morning before going into the long holiday weekend. WE will put combined moisture for the week now at .25”-1” with coverage at 70% of the state. Temps stay warm after warming up this weekend, and we should still be 2-8 degrees above normal all week next week. The map at right shows our rain potential combined over the next 10 days.  The extended period has a stronger cold front moving in around the 10th, taking through the 12th to slide through. This will bring some rain chances, up to an inch in spots. But, the strength and location of the front also hints at some significant change in airmass coming behind. In fact, we could be looking at a move to below normal temps closer to mid-month.last_img read more

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Remodeling Contractors Talk About Energy Retrofits

first_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Members Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.center_img One of the liveliest sessions at this year’s NESEA-sponsored conference (BuildingEnergy 16) in Boston was a panel discussion featuring four remodeling contractors. These energy-conscious New England builders talked about the challenges they face as they try to incorporate energy improvements into remodeling projects.The session, “Retrofit Like You Care About It: Inspiring Homeowners to Care About Efficiency,” featured Jamie Wolf (owner of Wolfworks in Avon, Connecticut), Joe Carry (owner of Decumanus Green in Lenox, Massachusetts), Heather Thompson (owner of Thompson Johnson Woodworks, Peaks Island, Maine), and Paul Eldrenkamp (owner of Byggmeister in Newton, Massachusetts).Moderator Dan Kolbert (owner of Kolbert Building in Portland, Maine) joined the discussion during the question-and-answer period.Each of the panelists spoke for a few minutes, and then the audience was invited to ask questions. Jamie Wolf “Performance is invisible. So how can we help homeowners learn to value what they can’t see?”“We bear the responsibility to alleviate our clients’ confusion. People want to make smart choices. So provide your clients with a set of smart choices.”“We need to anchor our ideas to a compelling story. ‘Barefoot comfort’ is a familiar sensation. It’s a useful place to start.”“Ice dams inspire action. Ice dams provide an opportunity to explain systemic failures.”“Don’t start with the solution; start with problem-seeking. Diagnosis comes before treatment. Start with blower-door testing and energy modeling.”“Make decisions that are important for performance early in the design process.”“Communicating all of this takes patience and persistence. Keep calm and choose your battles wisely.” Joe Carry “The builders I admire don’t present green building as an option. They only do one kind of building.” last_img read more

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Quebec court authorizes racial profiling class action against Montreal police

first_imgMONTREAL — A Quebec Superior Court judge has authorized a class action against the City of Montreal on behalf of citizens who allege they were unfairly arrested and racially profiled by the city’s police.Justice Andre Prevost ruled on Aug. 7 that the claimants met the criteria to proceed.The Black Coalition of Quebec filed the class action request on behalf of non-Caucasian citizens who were unjustly stopped, arrested or detained by Montreal police between Aug. 14, 2017 and Jan 11, 2019 and who suffered racial profiling or violations of their rights.The lead plaintiff is Alexandre Lamontagne, a man of Haitian origin who claims that in Aug. 2017 he was standing on the street checking his cell phone when he was questioned by two police officers.  He was arrested and charged with obstructing police work and assault with the intention of resisting arrest, but the charges were later dropped.In his ruling, Prevost said the class action would address a number of questions, including whether city representatives acted in a discriminatory fashion and violated the rights of the plaintiffs.The Black Coalition said in a statement that it believes the lawsuit will reduce instances of abuse and racial profiling by giving black and cultural communities access to justice.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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