Big, but neutral, USDA report day

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Doug Tenney, Leist MercantileFinally, the numbers.It looks to be a neutral report. Corn and soybean production reduced as expected. Corn fed to livestock was reduced 125 million bushels while ethanol was cut 25 million bushels. Soybean exports are down 25 million bushels, crush up 10 million bushels.The market and traders were thrilled with finally seeing some numbers from USDA today at noon. For weeks market participation has been reduced with daily volumes moving lower and narrow daily ranges. This past week corn has seen days with less than a two-cent range while soybeans could not muster a five-cent daily range. The market thrives on information. Today we get a massive dump of numbers.USDA published both the January and February numbers that are found in the Supply and Demand Report. They included final 2018 corn and soybean yields and production, and quarterly grain stocks as of Dec. 1, 2018. Also, the first report of 2019 U.S. winter wheat acres is in that pile of reports released. Prior to the noon report, corn was up 2 cents, soybeans were unchanged, while wheat was up 2-4 cents. Following the report, corn was down 2 cents, soybeans down 5 cents, and wheat up 1 cent.Many were expecting soybean yields to drop slightly, less than half a bushel per acre. In addition, the corn yield is expected to decline as well. Also, in the corn table corn for feed as well as corn used for ethanol were expected to decline.The big unknown from today is this — will the numbers reveal some surprises? Or, will the numbers quickly fade into the sunset as the market continues it immense focus on the U.S./China trade talks? Price volatility and wide trading ranges in the first few minutes for soybeans and corn were expected with the progress of trade talks to be a huge factor in the last half day of trading.The ongoing U.S./China trade talks remind us of two things. First, it is a given that when there is a government deadline, talks can go on up to the last minute before a deal is announced. Example, look at the U.S. government when it comes time to pass a budget and or spending appropriation. Second, the notion of “good cop, bad cop,” is very evident in the ongoing U.S./China trade talks this past month. One day, the U.S. trade representative can say talks are progressing well. The next day, the U.S. economic advisor can report talks are bogging down with little progress taking place. It appears the market was less than pleased with news yesterday that U.S. President Trump and China President Xi would not be meeting before the March 1 trade deadline previously announced.last_img read more

Continue reading

Feedly Demos Mobile App: Live Beta Coming Soon

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Tags:#mobile#RSS & Feeds#web Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Feedly, one of our favorite magazine-style feed readers, is opening the doors today on its “Feedly iPhone protoype 7”. With a name like that, we feel like we’ve just gotten access to the secret microfilm hidden in the false bottom of someone’s penny loafers. In a blog post today, the company showed off what it’s been working on for the last few months. And from what they’re saying, a live beta version is just around the corner. Related Posts mike melanson Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … The minute-long tour of the still-in-development iPhone app shows off how a user will be able to browse through their Feedly digest of articles, share, recommend and tweet about content, mark articles as read, and navigate between feeds.According to the blog post, Feedly is going for simplicity in use and design, as well as a multi-platform compatibility. It is soliciting user feedback before releasing a “prototype 8” and potentially a live beta version on March 15, which would, of course, coincide with SXSW Interactive in Austin, Texas. Already, suggestions are coming in on the blog post’s comments, and Feedly CEO Edwin Khodabakchian’s responses are letting us in on a few more details of what to expect, such as a “Save for Later” function, releases for both Android and Palm Pre, and transparent syncing with Feedly Desktop.Khodabakchian also hints at possibilities for sharing on a number of social networks, including Twitter and Buzz, and possibly more. He says that “our goal is to release the iPhone, Nexus One and Palm Pre at the same time,” and that they “will be offering feedly on iPad as soon as it is available.” last_img read more

Continue reading

Thread: Finally, a mesh protocol that works!

first_imgSmall Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to… Tags:#Google#IoT#protocols#Rigado#Thread#Weave Follow the Puck Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces ReadWrite Sponsorscenter_img Related Posts Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… Thread is a secure wireless mesh network architected for the home and its connected products. Everyone is excited about Thread because it’s a wireless protocol that’s designed by Google Nest (with Weave), is open(ish), is extremely resilient, scalable, and meshes. The best part about reading this article is that you can learn how to get your hands on one of the few Thread RF modules available now that you can play with.To date, mesh protocols have been notoriously high in promises and low in delivery. That’s okay, as mesh is a very, very, hard technology to get working correctly and Thread has built on the shoulders of the giants it stands on. But first, a quick briefing on Thread for those of you who are not familiar with it.Thread is primarily a mesh networking protocol. Each “node” (or product) in the network can act as a router, leader or end device. These then connect to a border router to get the data onto the network from and to the internet. Each network can only have one leader and each node must be capable of being a router or an end device. The node must independently make the decision to be a router or an end node depending on what the needs of the network are. Take a moment and re-read that. It’s dense but worth taking the time to understand completely.Now let’s get down and dirty and technical for the engineers amongst you now:Thread is a self-forming and self-healing network by design. There can be no single point of failure. Thread is carried on the IEEE 802.15.4 standard at 2.4ghz. The protocol is fully IPv6 compliant meaning that every node on the network has a full IP address by the use of a 6LoWPAN header. Since every node has a full IP address there is no need for NAT (Network Address Translation). Thread has embraced low-power techniques to enable what they call “sleepy nodes” – nodes that will go into deep sleep mode when not in active use. When they wake up or are pinged there is no need for the node to rejoin the network, as on wake the parent sees the device and recognizes it. The network is designed to continue operating locally when there is no general IP connection to the greater internet. Security is by object authentication on the network by key exchange. It uses a variant of the Diffie Hellman key exchange that leverages a NIST elliptic curve to make it more power efficient.For the product managers/owners amongst you, Thread is important because you don’t want your product to be a second class citizen in the new IoT order. You want it to be a first class participant and fully compliant with the protocol.The organization pushing Thread is committed to making it work and committed to stopping it from fragmenting. The working group reads like a who’s who of consumer, commercial and industrial vendors. So while we may have the “Betamax” problem occur again, the prospects look good for Thread and many powerful companies are eager to ensure that their products have Thread lest they are left out of the “Internet of Things Club.”Surj Patel, VP of Business Development, RigadoConsumer home products will be the first use caseThe first use cases will be consumer products in the smart home, but the commercial controls and industrial automation pioneers are eager to put Thread through its paces to see if it can replace the aging and fragile Zigbee protocol or the single vendor controlled Z-Wave.Now that’s all dandy, but what does it mean for you?The low energy experts at Rigado in Portland, OR have partnered with chip giant NXP to produce one of the first certified Thread modules to reach market – the R41Z. In addition, it also has Bluetooth low energy providing a double punch of connectivity for your projects. Rigado is now making a number of their post verification run modules available for ReadWrite readers who are working on actual products. You will get an eval board and a ton of support, BUT you must give back some feedback on how the experience can be improved. To sign-up for this beta program click here and fill out the brief form.This article was produced in partnership with Rigado.last_img read more

Continue reading