Chancellor talks budget freeze and COVID-19’s impact on TCU

first_img Previous articleHow distance learning is affecting the job hunt for seniorsNext articleCOVID-19’s impact on Frog Camp, recruitment Alexis King RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Alexis Kinghttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexis-king/ Linkedin Alexis King Photo by TCU Maps TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Twitter Facebook + posts Alexis Kinghttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexis-king/ TCU News Now 2/24/2021 printTCU froze its operating budget for the 2020-21 academic year as it braces for the fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic, the chancellor said. Chancellor Boschini speaks at his annual town hall in March 2013. Photo by TCU 360. “We are preparing for the worst, yet hoping for the best,” Chancellor Victor Boschini said Tuesday.Boschini said the university expects to lose anywhere between $39 and $50 million because of the virus. As a result, during its regularly scheduled spring meeting held via Zoom, the TCU Board of Trustees put merit increases for faculty and staff on hold until January and decided to leave most open positions vacant.  The chancellor added that the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic impacted TCU for five years and now has the idea that the university will “undergo the same impact for years.”The board also shelved plans to split Boschini’s responsibilities and hire a president to handle day-to-day operations.Along with the budget, COVID-19 has posed a potential impact on TCU’s enrollment. TCU received a record number of applications for the fall 2020 entering class — 20,889. However, the outbreak of COVID-19 may alter how many students will enroll and put a deposit down. The board has made the decision to approve the Fiscal Year 2021 operating budget with the stipulation that the university’s administration will evaluate the university’s financial position and post COVID-19 financial conditions.With these decisions, the chancellor added that students will not see any significant effect financially and ensures “these decisions are to help our students in the long run.”The TCU commons. Photo courtesy of TCU.Although the question still remains: Will TCU have in-person classes in the fall?In his honest opinion, Boschini is confident that TCU will resume with in-person classes in the fall, but the university is “always planning for both virtual and in-person classes.” Minority students talk about election results Alexis Kinghttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexis-king/ ReddIt World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Linkedin Facebook Twitter TCU News Now 3/24/2021 Alexis Kinghttps://www.tcu360.com/author/alexis-king/ Mada: How one app is helping you pick what to wear Welcome TCU Class of 2025 ReddIt Alexis King is a journalism major with a minor in digital culture/data analytics from Plano, Texas. Alexis hopes to to work in entertainment news after she graduates. Alexis enjoys traveling and spending time with her friends & family.last_img read more

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Diamond life in the Desmond Complex | Newcastle West Feature

first_imgAdvertisement NewsCommunityDiamond life in the Desmond Complex | Newcastle West FeatureBy Rose Rushe – October 12, 2019 348 WhatsApp Facebook Email Linkedincenter_img Twitter Print Desmond Complex, Newcastle West, Limerick. Photo: Cian ReinhardtFLOOR  to ceiling glass walls, a huge common room for bingo, dancing and courting, a restaurant with 60 covers in the day, rooms for hire by local services; gardens, a creche and playground on site: the Desmond Complex means business.Manager Aileen Harnett took us through this happy campus on a sun-drenched day on which the centre pulsed with life.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Built in response to a feasibility study in 1990s that showed a lack of support services for older people, since 1996, it is community led and owned. Limerick Citizens Information Services run morning clinics here Tuesday to Friday; Pobal and HSE are other stakeholders. Naturally, the Complex is a not for profit company.“With the aid of Local Link we share the cost of transport for older people and disabled people  from the wider West Limerick area.” Access and affordability are everything. Just €10 secures entry to all entertainment for the over 55s, pastoral services with Sisters Rena and Marie (Poor Servants of the Mother of God), sociability and a three-course meal, freshly cooked.“We have our day centre every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.  We have a lovely building and rent out rooms to local services. Citizens Information Services is here four mornings a week, from 10.30am into 2pm.“There is a Mother and Toddler group going on upstairs as I speak and we have loads of different activities going on – right now a coffee morning that is an annual fundraiser for Milford Hospice. It has raised €1,000′.The Desmond Community Creche is part of the one company and “very well supported. It is full and caters to all the schemes with a capacity for 110 children.”Across the yard stands the Brothers of Charity Early Intervention building. The Brothers rent the Hawthorne Suite five days in the principal building also to meet the needs of the community they foster.Business minded, the Desmond Complex hires space to private enterprise as well such as CareBright, slimming groups, Safe Pass training and even birthday parties on Sunday (self catered).“In the dining room we fit 80 seated and on a weekly basis, we comfortably provide for at least 160 meals.” Bernie Forrestal heads up the kitchen team and the food aromas circulating are delicious.Professional musicians set up in the common room with their own PA “and it is a very lively spot.” Aileen laughs. “We have joke tellers, we have singers, poetry speakers, a great varied group of people to entertain and have fun – and there is great dancing.” Folks, check out their Sloshy [line dancing].Late blooming romance? “Yes, it has been known to happen.” Again, that big bright smile from someone in love with their own lucky, lively job and diamond life at the Desmond Complex. Previous articleFILM REVIEW: JokerNext articleLimerick Councillor claims Gardaí “squaring” minor offences “often done” to maintain good relationship with public Rose Rushehttp://www.limerickpost.ieCommercial Features and Arts Editor at Limerick Postlast_img read more

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USCG Cutters Maintain Navigable Waterways

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today USCG Cutters Maintain Navigable Waterways View post tag: Mid-Atlantic View post tag: USCG View post tag: Naval February 23, 2015 View post tag: americas View post tag: break View post tag: Ice The crews of the US Coast Guard Cutters Capstan, Cleat and Chock are working this winter to break ice and maintain navigable waterways from the Delaware River, through the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, down to Tangier Island, Virginia.The crew of the Baltimore-based Chock traveled to Tangier Island to break ice and aid residents.While assisting Coast Guard Sector Hampton Roads, another crew was needed to take over the Sector Baltimore ice-breaking mission.The crew of the Cleat left Coast Guard Sector Delaware Bay to assist Baltimore during the Chocks’ deployment to Tangier Island.The cutters are all 65-foot, ice-breaking tugs and are designed to break ice up to 18 inches thick.[mappress mapid=”15201″]Image: USCGcenter_img View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Navy View post tag: Cutters USCG Cutters Maintain Navigable Waterways View post tag: Region Share this article Authoritieslast_img read more

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Record 79.5 million displaced at year-end despite COVID slowing exodus: UN

first_imgThe exodus includes 5 million Venezuelans who have fled their country mired in an economic and political crisis. Some 3.6 million of them were not counted in its previous statistics, but are now deemed in need of international protection, the UNHCR said.Most Venezuelans have gone to Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, Brazil and Chile. An estimated 30,000 to 50,000 have returned to their homeland since April, Grandi said.”In most of the countries Venezuelans live off of the informal economy and many even qualified people unfortunately have had to live a life of subsistence basically, selling vegetables in markets, doing menial work, it’s been really very precarious,” he said. “And with lockdowns, a lot of these jobs have disappeared almost overnight.”But restrictions imposed because of the pandemic have slowed displacement generally, Grandi said.”For the time being, most likely it has actually put breaks on movements because of the difficulties in moving. There has been basically no international travel, there has been very little ability to cross borders,” he added.Some 107,000 refugees were resettled in third countries last year, the UNHCR said.”This is a declining figure unfortunately. The resettlement to the US as you know has declined dramatically. The biggest resettlement country today is Canada,” Grandi said.Canada admitted 31,100 refugees for resettlement, the United States 27,500 and Australia 18,200, UNHCR figures show.  Nearly 80 million people worldwide, or 1% of humanity, were uprooted at the end of 2019 after fleeing wars or persecution, a record figure capping a “tumultuous” decade of displacement, the United Nations said on Thursday.The figure rose by some 9 million from a year earlier and is close to double the 41 million recorded in 2010, despite COVID-19 restrictions slowing down movement, the UN refugee agency UNHCR said.Syrians, Venezuelans, Afghans, South Sudanese, and stateless Rohingya from Myanmar top the list of 79.5 million refugees, asylum seekers and internally-displaced, it said in its annual flagship report, Global Trends. “This almost 80 million figure – the highest that UNHCR has recorded since these statistics have been systematically collected – is of course a reason for great concern,” said Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees.”This is by the way approximately 1% of the world population,” he told a news briefing.Some 73% of refugees seek asylum in a neighboring country, defying the populist notion that they flood to the West, Grandi said.”This continues to be a global issue, an issue for all states but an issue that challenges most directly the poorer countries, not the rich countries – in spite of the rhetoric,” he said of the displacement.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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