VS14: USS Mustin Launches Two SM-2 Missiles

first_img VS14: USS Mustin Launches Two SM-2 Missiles View post tag: americas View post tag: Navy Air and sea units from the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force participated in the sinking of ex-USS Fresno (LST 1182).Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89) is currently underway near Guam as part of Valiant Shield 2014.Valiant Shield is a U.S.-only exercise integrating U.S. Navy, Air Force, Army and Marine Corps assets, offering real-world joint operational experience to develop capabilities that provide a full range of options to defend U.S. interests and those of its allies and partners.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, September 17, 2014; Image: US Navy During the military exercise Valiant Shield 2014, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89) fired two SM-2 missiles as part of a sinking exercise. View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic View post tag: USS Mustin View post tag: two Share this articlecenter_img Back to overview,Home naval-today VS14: USS Mustin Launches Two SM-2 Missiles September 17, 2014 View post tag: SM-2 View post tag: Missiles View post tag: Valiant Shiels Authorities View post tag: VS14 View post tag: launcheslast_img read more

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Flanders’ Penthouse Suites: An Ocean City Hidden Treasure

first_imgFlanders Hotel Director of Operations Peter Voudouris on a balcony of a Penthouse luxury suite. By Tim KellyThey are the most opulent spaces in one of Ocean City’s most exclusive places.The Penthouses at the Flanders Hotel are extravagance on top of luxury. For those seeking the cushiest temporary digs in Ocean City, or for that matter anywhere along the Jersey Shore, the Flanders Penthouses are just the thing.“The finest accommodations in Ocean City, there’s no question about it,” said Peter Voudouris, Director of Hotel Operations.If Voudouris sounds slightly biased, a tour of the five swanky Penthouses has a way of turning your thinking around.A living area of a Flanders Hotel Penthouse suite.Overstuffed chairs and sofas, and lots of them, hardwood floors, vaulted tray ceilings, gas fireplaces, and 14-carat gold plated bathroom fixtures are just a few of the Penthouses’ eye-popping features.Perks like a private elevator, wet bars, spacious dining areas, outdoor terraces and the option to live there year-round are part of the appeal.And then there are the views. Located on the upper floors of the landmark 1923 property, a view of the coast all the way to Sea Isle City can be seen on a clear day. To the North, the panorama includes beach, boardwalk and Ocean City neighborhoodsThe Penthouses come in three varieties: Southview with two bedrooms and two baths ; Ocean Front with two bedrooms and three baths. Both of these sizes comfortably sleep six. The crown jewel is the two-story, 2,300 sq. ft. Terrace Townhouse with three bedrooms and three baths, sleeping eight.A South facing Penthouse Suite at the Flanders.As one would expect, an in-season stay is pricey, ranging from $920 to $1,320 a night during the prime vacation weeks of June 15 through September 3. However, some parties divide the cost to make it more reasonable.  And if you’re a fan of year-round visits, you can steal a Southview suite for a mere $350 a night from October 26 through April 12, 2019.  Divide that cost and it can be less than a budget hotel rate per-person.If you want a Penthouse for Memorial Day weekend, the per-night cost is $680 for a Southview, $770 for Oceanfront and $875 for the Terrace Townhouse.For a complete list of seasonal prices, visit www.theflandershotel.comAlthough the Flanders, which had stood at 11th Street and the Boardwalk since 1923, is one of the oldest and most iconic businesses in town, the Penthouse suites are one of the town’s lesser-known treasures. Surprisingly, the four smaller suites are also one of its newest additions.One of The Flanders Master Bedrooms.They were created in 2001 when a previous owner of the hotel literally punched holes in the roof to build them.“They were about 70 percent completed when (the owner) ran out of money, and the contractors walked off the job,” Voudouris said.When the building changed hands in 2004, a new Owner’s Association took over and finished building the long-dormant Penthouses. They were put up for sale in 2005 and private owners snapped them up within the year. The Penthouse owners stay in them at times, but mostly rent them out.The Skyline Terrace Penthouse is a story in its own right. The oceanfront luxury suite has been restored to its original 1923 splendor. There are outdoor patios, and French doors open to an oceanfront patio and a second private patio off the master bedroom.  The private elevator opens to the foyer and its 18-ft. ceiling on the top floor.  There are three gas fireplaces, a clothes washer and dryer and a wet-bar.The market includes weddings (the Flanders hosts about 60 each year) business meeting and attendees to the dozens of special events taking place in the 25,000 sq. ft. of banquet and conference space, Voudouris said.Of course, Penthouse guests have access to Emily’s Restaurant, coffee shop, the outdoor heated pool, business center, gym, salon and spa, shops and free wireless internet, among other amenities.The all-suites hotel was named to the National Register of Historic Places in 2009.“Our goal was to develop a true resort hotel with every service you would find at a top resort and to bring that type of property to Ocean City” Voudouris said. “I think we’ve accomplished that.”The Flanders Hotel, pictured here in mid-summer, is ideally located in the heart of everything the city has to offer.last_img read more

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The staggering toll of noncommunicable diseases

first_imgChronic diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, and cancer, are the leading cause of death worldwide, with the burden falling heaviest in low- and middle-income countries. A new article by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers outlines the global burden of chronic, or noncommunicable, diseases and proposes ways in which national leaders and heads of international organizations can develop systems to cope with these long-term conditions that the authors call the “dominant global public health challenge of the 21st century.”The article was published October 3, 2013 in the New England Journal of Medicine as part of a series on global health edited by co-author David Hunter, Vincent L. Gregory Professor in Cancer Prevention and Dean for Academic Affairs at HSPH, and Harvey Fineberg, president of the Institute of Medicine and former dean of HSPH.According to World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, noncommunicable diseases contributed to 36 million deaths globally in 2008, accounting for 63% of 57 million total deaths. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 estimated that mortality due to noncommunicable diseases increased from 57% of total deaths in 1990 to 65% in 2010. About 80% of deaths related to noncommunicable diseases occur in low- and middle-income countries. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Syracuse’s ‘quarterback’ Asa Goldstock jump starts SU’s offensive sets

first_imgAll season long, Asa Goldstock’s goal has been to play closer to the net. But against Louisville, she couldn’t have gone further. The sophomore, with her eyes on the UofL players who were spaced on her wings, just walked. To the 30-yard line, the 40-yard line, midfield and then as she breached opponent territory, she still looked for a place to go with the ball, but again, she still walked. SU’s goalie marched forward until she could go no more, forced to rid herself of the ball at the clear line on the opposing 30-yard line.It was a meaningless play for Syracuse, who passed the ball around a few times before UofL regained possession. But the routine was telling of Goldstock, who has this season exuded confidence in an ability that has never escaped her. “I’ve been trying my best to take the ball up the field quick,” Goldstock said. “If I make the save, might as well start the transition and take the ball up the field quick.”While the sophomore has made improvements in goal, she said SU head coach Gary Gait has told her to not lose her aggressiveness which has caused her to jumpstart the Syracuse (9-9, 1-6 Atlantic Coast) offense on multiple occasions this season. Freshman Sam Swart put it into perspective: Goldstock, perhaps the Orange’s most dynamic player on the defensive side, sometimes also acts as SU’s “quarterback” on offense. Goldstock’s play on both sides of the field will be instrumental as the Orange opens the NCAA tournament against Princeton (12-5, 6-1 Ivy League) on Friday.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Asa can handle it herself,” Swart said after Syracuse’s early season win over then-No. 4 Florida, where Goldstock dominated in and out of the net. Max Freund | Staff PhotographerWhile Swart noted that the Orange doesn’t run set plays for immediately following saves, the Orange players run sequential routes every time the ball finds its way into Goldstock’s pocket. Midfielders cross and defensive players, particularly Ella Simkins, streak upfield to receive the ball.Her hand in the offense has not showed on the stat sheet — Goldstock only has one assist in her two years with the Orange — but some of SU’s offensive success is dependent on her ability to clear the ball down the field. Playing more steady, the sophomore has retained similar turnovers numbers this year (1.32 last season and 1.27 per game this year) and is the top clearer on an SU team with an .816 clear percentage. While this is just an average — sometimes her attempts at long clears or audacious advances up the field backfire — Goldstock’s aggression has led to more good than bad.The goal of the Orange this season has been to get the ball out quickly to give offensive players a chance to convert on the other end, Goldstock said. The 19th-ranked SU scoring offense has gotten that help from multiple contributors, particularly its young goalie.Goldstock admitted that in her trips up the field, although getting the ball to her teammates is her top priority, she sometimes looks towards the goal. She said it’s “not possible” in lacrosse for a goalkeeper to score, but that hasn’t stopped her from dreaming.“Maybe one day,” she quipped.Gait said that Goldstock, despite what the sophomore said about her coach encouraging her aggressiveness, needs to work on making better decisions. He said Goldstock “doing a little bit too much” granted Cornell opportunities in SU’s 14-7 domination of the Big Red.He said she would benefit, on some occasions, by getting the ball out to a streaking defender rather than taking the ball upfield.“Rather than giving up the short pass, (she’s) giving up the long bomb,” Gait said. “Sometimes you need to make better decisions.”Despite her coach’s preaching, Goldstock’s play style hasn’t changed. Her attacking mindset hasn’t wavered and, when Syracuse faces a Princeton team anchored by the country’s 35th-ranked defense, the Orange will take all the help it can get, no matter how it gets it.“I’d like to ignite something in my team,” Goldstock said, “if that makes me a quarterback, then so be it.” Comments Published on May 9, 2018 at 11:00 pm Contact Michael: [email protected] | @MikeJMcCleary Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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