College Students Receive 2013 Pork Industry Scholarships

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News College Students Receive 2013 Pork Industry Scholarships The Pork Checkoff is dedicated to helping develop the next generation of pork professionals – according to National Pork Board President Conley Nelson. He says the checkoff’s ongoing service and obligation to producers includes ensuring there’s a sustainable source of young people ready to take on the industry’s commitment to continuous improvement in all aspects of pork production. That’s why the checkoff has awarded 22 college students from across the U.S. scholarships based on scholastic merit, leadership, pork industry involvement and future pork production career plans. Nelson says a skilled workforce is essential for the competitiveness of the pork industry – and this is a chance for the industry to encourage these young people to join a workforce offering many diverse opportunities.One scholarship recipient – Corey Carpenter of California – will receive five-thousand dollars. The runner-up – Austin Putz of Iowa – will receive 35-hundred dollars. The 20 other scholarship recipients will each get two-thousand dollars. They are: Courtney Adams of Florida, David Ammann of Illinois, Denise Beam of Pennsylvania, Vance Brown of Pennsylvania, Bailey Farrer of Indiana, Cassandra Ferring of North Carolina, Erin Geary of Missouri, Corrine Harris of Washington, Tori Harris of Oklahoma, Cassie Holloway of Maryland, Andrew Langel of Iowa, Emily Limes of Ohio, Amanda Outhouse of Iowa, Rachel Palinski of Georgia, Matt Patterson of Missouri, Taylor Petersen of Iowa, Brent Saxton of Iowa, Sterling Schnepf of Iowa, Katie Stueck of Iowa and Alyssa Thomas of Missouri.Source: NAFB News Service Facebook Twitter By Andy Eubank – Apr 18, 2013 Facebook Twitter SHARE SHARE College Students Receive 2013 Pork Industry Scholarships Previous articleTexas Fertilizer Explosion Tragic but RareNext articleAmerican Ethanol Races into Spotlight this Weekend in Kansas Andy Eubanklast_img read more

Continue reading

Don’t Test Your Luck this St. Patrick’s Day: RAD and Local Businesses Remind You to Drive Sober

first_img Top of the News 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Herbeauty15 things only girls who live life to the maximum understandHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWomen Love These Great Tips To Making Your Teeth Look WhiterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Normal To Date Your BFF’s Ex?HerbeautyHerbeauty faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Community News Business News This St. Patrick’s Day weekend, Rethinking Alcohol and Other Drugs (RAD) is partnering up with local businesses in the San Gabriel Valley on a Public Awareness Campaign to help prevent drunk driving and remind bar and restaurant patrons to plan ahead for a safe St. Patrick’s Day. The holiday is meant to celebrate Saint Patrick and the heritage and culture of the Irish in general. However, reports show that popular “bar holidays” like St. Patrick’s Day are among the most dangerous days for drunk and drugged driving deaths. In fact, drunk driving deaths and underage drinking increase around popular celebrations. Alcohol remains the second leading cause of death and disability in Los Angeles County, and is associated with over 54 acute and chronic health conditions. It is illegal in every state to drive with a blood-alcohol concentration of (BAC) of .08 or higher, yet:• Over 1 in 3 fatal collisions involve alcohol.• 1 person is killed in a drunk-driving crash every 52 minutes.• Alcohol-related emergency room visits increased by 82% between 2006-2013 in LA County.• 10,076 people were killed in crashes involving alcohol in 2014. 65% were the drunk drivers themselves.• Over 1 in 3 young adults (Ages 18-25) binge drink.• 1 in 5 child passenger deaths involve a drunk driver.• Almost 1 in 10 (8%) of drunk drivers involved in fatal crashes have one or more previous DUI convictions.• Men are more likely than women to be driving drunk in fatal crashes.• Drunk driving is more common at night: Half of all traffic fatalities at night (6 p.m. to 5:59 a.m.) involve drunk drivers.• Among drivers ages 18-34, 45% of fatalities involve a drunk driver with a BAC of .08 or higher.• Excessive alcohol consumption costs LA County $10.8 Billion every year (Roughly $1,000 per resident.)• Impaired-driving crashes cost the United States $49.8 Billion every year.• After alcohol, marijuana and prescription drugs are most commonly linked to drugged driving crashes.RAD and local businesses remind you to plan ahead for a safe St. Patrick’s Day with 5 simple steps:1. Talk about the risks of excessive alcohol use with your teens, friends and family.2. Only Drive Sober: Designate a non-drinking driver before any celebration, and encourage others to do the same.3. Take the Keys: Never let friends drive under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.4. Be a responsible host: Serve water and offer non-alcoholic beverages.5. Never provide alcohol or other drugs to minors: Keep alcohol away from minors and supervise.http://www.rad-sgv.org/blog/dont-test-your-luck-this-st-patricks-day-drive-soberParticipating businesses:PasadenaThe Blind DonkeyIxtapa?Barney’s BeaneryDog Haus BiergartenCabrera’s Mexican RestaurantKings Row Gastropub35erJerry’s Family BilliardsBowlmor PasadenaSetebelloSouth PasadenaThe Raymond RestaurantGus’ BBQCanoe HouseAi Japanese RestaurantBarkley RestaurantMike & Anne’sAro LatinGriffins Of Kinsale?AlhambraLimericks TavernPomonaCharacter Sports BarThe Burger HousePizza Beer and WingsO’Donovans PubMetro Ale HouseCovinaAZO VinoAlosta Brewing CompanyRomero Estate VineyardREV Winery and BreweryRude Dog Bar & GrillBread & BarleyCasa Moreno GrillBrew & Meatball CoCity Grill Public Safety Don’t Test Your Luck this St. Patrick’s Day: RAD and Local Businesses Remind You to Drive Sober From STAFF REPORTS Published on Friday, March 17, 2017 | 12:54 pm First Heatwave Expected Next Week center_img Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News Subscribe EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS More Cool Stuff Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Make a commentlast_img read more

Continue reading

The staggering toll of noncommunicable diseases

first_imgChronic diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, and cancer, are the leading cause of death worldwide, with the burden falling heaviest in low- and middle-income countries. A new article by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers outlines the global burden of chronic, or noncommunicable, diseases and proposes ways in which national leaders and heads of international organizations can develop systems to cope with these long-term conditions that the authors call the “dominant global public health challenge of the 21st century.”The article was published October 3, 2013 in the New England Journal of Medicine as part of a series on global health edited by co-author David Hunter, Vincent L. Gregory Professor in Cancer Prevention and Dean for Academic Affairs at HSPH, and Harvey Fineberg, president of the Institute of Medicine and former dean of HSPH.According to World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, noncommunicable diseases contributed to 36 million deaths globally in 2008, accounting for 63% of 57 million total deaths. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 estimated that mortality due to noncommunicable diseases increased from 57% of total deaths in 1990 to 65% in 2010. About 80% of deaths related to noncommunicable diseases occur in low- and middle-income countries. Read Full Storylast_img read more

Continue reading

Use fireworks safely this summer

first_imgIn 2017, according to the National Safety Council, eight people died and over 12,000 were injured badly enough to require medical treatment after fireworks-related incidents. Of these, 50% of the injuries were to children and young adults under age 20. Over two-thirds (67%) of injuries took place from June 16 to July 16. And while the majority of these incidents were due to amateurs attempting to use professional-grade, homemade, or other illegal fireworks or explosives, an estimated 1,200 injuries were from less powerful devices like small firecrackers and sparklers. The National Safety Council advises everyone to enjoy fireworks at public displays conducted by professionals, and not to use any fireworks at home. They may be legal but they are not safe.If consumer fireworks are legal to buy where you live and you choose to use them, be sure to follow the following safety tips:Never allow young children to handle fireworksOlder children should use them only under close adult supervisionNever use fireworks while impaired by drugs or alcoholAnyone using fireworks or standing nearby should wear protective eyewearNever hold lighted fireworks in your handsNever light them indoorsOnly use them away from people, houses and flammable materialNever point or throw fireworks at another personOnly light one device at a time and maintain a safe distance after lightingNever ignite devices in a containerDo not try to re-light or handle malfunctioning fireworksSoak both spent and unused fireworks in water for a few hours before discardingKeep a bucket of water nearby to fully extinguish fireworks that don’t go off or in case of fireNever use illegal fireworksBetter yet, grab a blanket and a patch of lawn, kick back and let the experts handle the fireworks show.Sparklers Are Dangerous. Every year, young children can be found along parade routes and at festivals with sparklers in hand, but sparklers are a lot more dangerous than most people think.Sparklers burn at about 2,000 degrees – hot enough to melt some metals. Sparklers can quickly ignite clothing, and children have received severe burns from dropping sparklers on their feet. According to the National Fire Protection Association, sparklers alone account for more than 25% of emergency room visits for fireworks injuries. For children under 5 years of age, sparklers accounted for nearly half of the total estimated injuries.Consider using safer alternatives, such as glow sticks, confetti poppers, or colored streamers.last_img read more

Continue reading