American Utility Giant Earmarks $1.8 Billion for Renewable Generation

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Magazine:American Electric Power (AEP), one of the United State’s largest power companies and one that owns a disproportionate share of coal assets, announced that it will invest $1.8 billion in new renewable energy projects during the 2018-2020 timeframe. This is nearly five times the company’s current investment in renewable energy generation by dollar value.This $1.8 billion will represent around 10% of the company’s planned capital outlays during the period, 72% of which will go to its transmission and distribution businesses. While AEP still owns 60 power plants totaling 26 GW of capacity (47% of which is coal-fired generation), in the past 10 years the company has taken a sharp turn in strategy away from investing in generation towards its transmission and distribution.Details in an AEP press release and a conference presentation are sparse. But while it appears that most of this will be wind, among the 5.57 GW of renewable energy projects identified for completion through 2025 under to serve its regulated utility businesses the company is looking at 1.37 GW of solar.AEP has also revealed that among the $1.8 billion for renewables it plans to invest $1.3 billion in projects under power contracts. These investments will be split over its AEP Onsite Partners and AEP Renewables subsidiaries, with Onsite Partners owning distributed generation and selling the power to schools, municipalities, hospitals and other commercial and industrial customers. In addition to distributed solar, Onsite Partners plans to build and own both energy storage and substations.The capacity of wind and solar assets owned by these companies are much smaller at present, together representing investments of less than $400 million. AEP Onsite Partners holds 31 MW of solar in operation and 42 MW under construction, and AEP Renewables currently owns three utility-scale wind and solar projects totaling 116 MW. The latter includes the 62 MW Boulder Solar 2 project.AEP characterizes its approach to these contracts as looking to develop fully contracted assets with strong credit counterparties, with the aim of seeking long-term, predictable cash flows. This will include specific requirements on project returns, and what it calls a “measured” approach to project risks.More: AEP to invest $1.8 billion in renewables over the next three years American Utility Giant Earmarks $1.8 Billion for Renewable Generationlast_img read more

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Keane error costly for Unrequited

first_imgUnrequited was disqualified following his victory in the Children’s Day At Bettyville Handicap at Wexford after Colin Keane failed to weigh in. Ring Chief was promoted to second and The Fox Tully awarded third, while Keane was suspended for 10 days by the stewards and ordered to forfeit his riding fee. Lyons’ assistant and brother Shane said: “If that’s the worst thing that ever happens to him (Keane) he won’t be too bad. He is very upset about it, but we are behind him 100 per cent.” Heffernan went on to land a double and he needed no help from the stewards after springing clear three furlongs out on the Robbie Hennessy-trained Magnetic Force (16-1) in the Boolavogue Handicap. The grey was chased hard by Little Stampy, but had enough in the locker to hold off the challenge by a length and three-quarters. David Wachman also landed a double, highlighted by the easy victory of 4-11 favourite Mr Rock in the Follow Wexford Racecourse On Facebook Maiden. Second at Leopardstown on his previous start, the three-year-old was bounced out in front by Wayne Lordan and always looked in command, having the opposition in trouble fully two furlongs out before clearing away to score by seven and a half lengths. The jockey said: “I suppose he had two good runs under his belt. He is a horse that likes quick ground and he stays well. I’d say it wasn’t much of a contest considering what he has been taking on. He will step forward again. He is a big horse, a big baby. He works well. He is probably better than that and he is just a bit immature.” There were few alarms for Wachman’s other winner either, Fran Berry pressing the button a quarter of a mile out on Que Sera Sera in the Irish Stallion Farms EBF Fillies Maiden and soon asserting, the 11-4 favourite running on strongly to score by two and a quarter lengths. The jockey rode a peach of a race to win the one-mile-three-furlong handicap on Ger Lyons’ charge, committing for home nearly three furlongs out and getting a terrific response from his mount, who ran on strongly down the straight to hold Coolfighter by two lengths. However, Keane did not weigh in afterwards, prompting the stewards to disqualify Unrequited (13-2) and award the race to the Noel Dooly-trained Coolfighter (13-2), who was bringing up a hat-trick in the hands of Seamie Heffernan. Katie Walsh stalked her two rivals for most of the way on Peter Fahey’s Alton Bay in the Shelmalier (QR) Race before sweeping past at the furlong pole to win going away by four and three-quarter lengths as the 3-1 shot completed a four-timer. The trainer said: “It’s incredible, he has won four for us and he has collected prize money every single time he ran, and we couldn’t ask for any more. He will run once or twice more if the ground stays quick. If the ground goes any way soft at all he will go out until the spring and come back to go novice hurdling. If he improves as much next year you wouldn’t know what we have.” Willie Mullins’ Morning Run (1-3 favourite) easily extended her unbeaten run to three in the Enniscorthy Mares INH Flat Race in the hands of Patrick Mullins. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Nothing good can come from weekend

first_imgWhen I’m dealing with a tough situation, I’ve learned to take a simple approach in order to decide what to do.First, I think of the worst-case scenario and imagine that. Second, I think of the best-case scenario and imagine that.Then I decide what to do.Intuitive, I know.Why am I telling you this?Well, I tried to use my usual approach when deciding what to think about USC’s appearance before the NCAA Committee on Infractions this weekend in Tempe, Ariz.The worst-case scenario, I reckoned, is some combination of sanctions that force the football team to vacate the wins from past years, lose scholarships and a ban from postseason play for the next few seasons.Yeah, it doesn’t look too great when you add it all up.I ran into some trouble, though, when trying to decipher what the best case would be.Really now, what’s a reasonable best-case scenario for the hearings?We won’t officially know anything for at least six weeks, but let’s recap the situation briefly before we decide our mindset between now and April.A combined eight coaches and higher-ups from USC spent three full days — something close to 36 actual hours — in a hearing, discussing alleged violations and a lack of ever-important institutional control over the last five or so years.David Price, the NCAA vice president for enforcement services, told the New York Times it was the longest hearing he had ever been a part of.Hmm. He’s worked for the infractions committee for 11 years now. And, mind you, these hearings usually involve more than one team over the course of a day — not one school’s two biggest programs over an entire weekend.Think there might be something going on?Current running backs coach Todd McNair brought his attorney along for the ride for the first two days of the hearing. Former men’s basketball coach Tim Floyd brought one of his on Saturday.Why the legal counsel?Firstly, McNair was former USC running back Reggie Bush’s position coach at the time when Bush  is believed to have received as much as $300,000 worth of cash and goods from potential marketing agencies.Multiple sources have reported that McNair knew of Bush’s associations with a business called New Era Sports & Entertainment during his college career. New Era — allegedly the brainchild of Bush’s stepfather, LaMar Griffin, but funded entirely by other financiers — paid for Bush’s accommodations during multiple hotel stays and provided other items to him and his family, Yahoo! Sports first reported in 2006.And therein lies the rub, because two New Era financiers — the ridiculously named Michael Michaels and Bush’s friend Lloyd Lake — are believed to have visited the USC locker room twice after games in the 2005 season.Reports say that alone is grounds for a lack of institutional control ruling.And I haven’t even gotten to Floyd yet.The now-New Orleans Hornets assistant coach flew in to Tempe this weekend to plead his case to the NCAA committee. Floyd resigned last summer amid allegations that he paid at least $1,000 in cash to a runner for a potential agent of former USC guard O.J. Mayo and knew of money that changed hands between Mayo and the now-infamous Rodney Guillory.Confusing, isn’t it?But despite admitted wrongdoing and self-imposed sanctions on the basketball program last month, reports have the issue as another possible example of a lack of institutional control.Meanwhile, Floyd’s time at USC is done. But he came to Arizona, his lawyer said, to clear his name.How exactly did he and his attorney try to do that?Your guess is as good as mine. As for that whole best-case scenario thing, well, you can go ahead and guess that, too.And now you see why my approach failed.“Looking Past the X’s and O’s” runs Mondays. To comment on this article, visit dailytrojan.com or e-mail Pedro at [email protected]last_img read more

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