The California Honeydrops Cover R. Kelly, Al Green & More In NYC Throwdown [Watch]

first_imgThe California Honeydrops put their soulful rock n’ roll on display at the Bowery Ballroom last night, November 13th, playing to a packed house at the NYC venue. The band rolled out a ton of original music, and slipped in a few great covers as well. Fortunately, Marc Millman Photography was on the scene to capture the magic.Check out videos from last night’s performance, below.“Let’s Go Get Stoned”“Bump & Grind”“I’ve Never Found A Girl”last_img

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January 15, 2005 On the Move

first_imgOn the Move Nelda Lawrence joined the litigation department of Pathman Lewis in Miami. Christopher J.M. Collings, Grace M. Mora, and Joshua Charles Prever joined the Miami office of Morgan Lewis as associates. Anna Chesser Smith joined the Tampa office of Bush, Ross, Gardner, Warren & Rudy, P.A., as an associate. Smith practices in the areas of commercial litigation and general civil litigation. Maria C. Carantzas of the corporate practice group of Akerman Senterfitt in Jacksonville and Edward H. Trent of the labor and employment practice group were elected shareholders of the firm. Additionally, Benjamin H. Hill IV of the Tampa office also was elected shareholder. John Z. Lagrow joined the Maitland firm of Jay M. Fisher, P.A., as an associate. Ethan Kominsky joined Rosenthal & Levy, P.A., in West Palm Beach. Kominsky concentrates his practice on representing injured and disabled individuals in personal injury and Social Security disability law. Jeff Berman joined Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell, P.A., as an associate practicing in the areas of products liability, premises liability, and asbestos defense litigation. Pamela Jo Hatley announces the opening of her law practice with offices located at 12909 N. 56th Street, Suite 209, Tampa 33617; phone (813) 984-1480; Web site www.pamelajohatley.com. The firm focuses on environmental, land use, real property, and animal law. Janet M. Saura of Office Depot was promoted to vice president, employment law and government compliance. Saura provides advice, counsel, and training to the company’s human resources and management team regarding employment and discrimination matters. Munch & Munch, P.A., announces the relocation of its offices to 212 S. Magnolia Ave., Tampa 33606; phone (813) 254-1557; fax (813) 254-5172; e-mail [email protected]; Web site www.munchandmunch.com. The firm continues its practice of personal injury and wrongful death litigation with an emphasis on admiralty and maritime claims. January 15, 2005 On the Move January 15, 2005 On the Movelast_img read more

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‘Unprecedented’ mental health issues seen in Hong Kong amid virus fears

first_imgAs Hong Kong tries to contain the coronavirus outbreak, medical experts say many in the Asian financial hub are reeling from increased anxiety and an unprecedented level of mental health issues.The SARS-CoV-2 epidemic came after months of tumultuous anti-government protests that had already led to a sharp increase in depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), they said.It also touches on fears of the 2003 SARS epidemic, which killed nearly 300 people in the city. “Hoarding tissue, bags of rice, are measures to cope with the anxiety rather than fulfilling needs of daily life. They are hoarding way beyond their only needs,” said Eliza Cheung, a clinical psychologist at Hong Kong Red Cross.Hong Kong has about 100 confirmed cases of the coronavirus and has reported two deaths.A mental health hotline the government opened in January has received about 25,000 calls, authorities said, while voluntary groups have sprung into action to help counsel people, particularly those quarantined at home.”We have everyone calling from the entire spectrum, elderly from the nursing home to teenagers. We are just trying to hang onto each day as it is at the moment,” said Karman Leung, chief executive of Samaritans Hong Kong, a local non-governmental organization that assists people in distress.Low-income residents have been particularly hurt by a deepening slowdown in Hong Kong’s economy, battered by protests and the Sino-US trade war.The Society for Community Organization (SoCO), a local organization that works on poverty alleviation, said 70 percent of poor families can’t afford masks and disinfectant.Authorities have pledged cash handouts to residents and tax breaks to businesses. Last week, the city’s finance secretary unveiled measures to allocate “sufficient resources” to help with mental health problems.Some residents remain optimistic.”This virus, I thought it came at a good time, where we are so divided. Hopefully it will bring us together again. Each one of us hopefully trying to fight this disease,” said Derek Au, 46, a Hong Kong resident. “Hong Kong is in a unique position, due to changes to our routine, previous months of social unrest and deep memories of SARS,” said Carol Liang, an executive at Mind Hong Kong, a mental health charity in the former British colony.A University of Hong Kong survey found that a third of adults in the special administrative region reported symptoms of PTSD, up from 2 percent in 2015, while 11 percent reported depression, up from 2 percent during the Occupy protests in 2014.Since January, tens of thousands have been working from home, many cooped up in tiny apartments, while the stockpiling of basic food and cleaning products has become common.Children stuck at home must grapple with online learning while many families, particularly the poor, are unable to get protective gear.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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