Lloyds Bank Foundation report calls for greater support to help small charities

first_img Government, funders, and large charities must take action to help smaller charities survive into the future, according to a new report.Lloyds Bank Foundation’s Facing Forward report identifies and analyses ten upcoming political, economic, social and technological changes that the Foundation believes will dramatically affect the operating landscape for small and medium charities in England and Wales.The ten trends to watch include the road to Brexit, an unpredictable economy, cuts to council-funded services, a reshaping of public services, technological developments, and public trust issues.The report sets out a plan for small charities to help them take action and adapt to meet these challenges, such as by diversifying their income, developing collaborations, improving digital abilities, and looking after their staff.In addition, the report calls for clear and decisive action from other stakeholders whose actions influence the survival of small charities, stating that:National and local government must use appropriate commissioning processes when securing public servicesFunders must fund charities to build their capacity and effectiveness rather than constantly seeking innovationLarger charities must seek to collaborate with small charities rather than compete against them for public service contractsIn response to the analysis, Lloyds Bank Foundation has also annnounced its own plans for better supporting small charities, including:Providing greater financial stability for small charities by offering some charities it supports a further three years funding with no new grant application processesInfluencing the policy and operating environment for small charities with a new £100,000 investment in the Small Charities Coalition, to fund its policy and engagement workEvidencing the social and economic value of small charities with a new independent study by Sheffield Hallam University, IVAR and Open UniversityPaul Streets, chief executive of Lloyds Bank Foundation for England & Wales said: Advertisement About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. “For many small and local charities, issues like Brexit and the changing political landscape can be difficult to plan for if you’re facing a constant battle to deliver essential public services, with ever dwindling resources.“We’re doing our bit by improving our grant making and continuing to lobby for change, but Government, other funders and larger charities must also set out how they will support small charities through the tough times ahead. The future of too many essential public services and charities working at the heart of local communities is at risk if we don’t collectively act now.”  53 total views,  1 views today Lloyds Bank Foundation report calls for greater support to help small charities AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis34center_img Tagged with: Research / statistics small charities Melanie May | 22 March 2017 | News  54 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis34last_img read more

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Hale’s two home runs propel BYU to 10-6 win over Gaels

first_imgFive Cougars had multiple hits, including Hale going 3-for-4 with four RBIs, two home runs and a walk. Cluff went 3-for-5 with a double and two runs while McIntyre had two hits, two RBIs and three runs. McLaughlin was perfect in relief over 3.2 innings to notch his second save of the season. Written by Keaton Kringlen and Noah Hill picked up an RBI each in the third inning. In the fourth, Hale hit another home run, a solo shot to left-center, to make it an 8-2 lead for BYU. For Hale, it made two career two-home run games, with the other coming on May 18, 2017, against Gonzaga. First-inning home runs from Brock Hale and Mitch McIntyre marked the first two-homer inning for the Cougars this seasonHale’s two home runs tie a career high he originally set two years ago in a game against GonzagaBYU is on a six-game winning streak, the Cougars’ second streak of six wins this season Jordan Wood, who started on the mound for the Cougars, improved to 4-0 by going 5.1 innings with four strikeouts. Reid McLaughlin entered the game for BYU in the sixth with the bases loaded and one out, inducing a 1-2-3 double-play ball to preserve BYU’s 9-6 lead. The Gaels scored two in runs in the first and would have had more except for a catch in center field that saw BYU’s Danny Gelalich catch and hold on to a deep fly ball before running full speed into the wall. Hall brought home McIntyre in the seventh with a sacrifice fly to put the Cougars up 10-6. March 28, 2019 /Sports News – Local Hale’s two home runs propel BYU to 10-6 win over Gaels Both teams got one across in the fifth inning, with Hall scoring McIntyre from second on a single through the left side. Robert Lovell Player Highlights The Cougars responded with five in the bottom half. Hale blasted a three-run homer over the center field fence. After a Jackson Cluff single, Mitch McIntyre also homered to center field. Brock Hale: 3-4, 2 HR, 4 RBI, 2 R, BBMitch McIntyre: 2-4, HR, 2 RBI, 3 RReid McLaughlin: S (2), 3.2 IP, 3 K, 0 H, 0 BB, 0 ER FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPROVO, Utah – Senior Brock Hale slugged two home runs and freshman Reid McLaughlin was perfect in relief as BYU baseball beat Saint Mary’s 10-6 in the series opener Thursday at Larry H. Miller Field. Another highlight defensive play came in the bottom of the third when Jaren Hall, who entered for an injured Gelalich, made a leaping catch at the fence in center for the last out of the inning. The series between BYU and Saint Mary’s continues with game two on Friday at 6 p.m. MDT. The game will air on TheW.tv, BYU Radio and ESPN 960. Tags: Brock Hale/BYU Cougars Baseball/WCC “We really swung the bat well,” BYU head coach Mike Littlewood said. “We answered back in the first inning and that carried us to the victory tonight.”Game Summarylast_img read more

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Trump’s motives on Jerusalem are unclear

first_imgThe Palestinians would get a state, though the 1967 lines would not be its borders.According to some, the territory they get would not be contiguous.That would amount to substantially less than the Palestinians demand and far more than Israel’s right flank intends to give them.If the administration is serious about such a deal, Trump needs to buy the allegiance of both sides.The capital announcement is a prize that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (weakened by corruption scandals and in no position to push back) can use to assuage his right flank.At the same time, Trump may have told Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas (who is 82 and running out of time) that no one will object if the Palestinians protest or burn flags, but serious violence will not be tolerated.If Abbas wants his state, he may have heard, he had better make sure to keep the response to Trump’s announcement muted.Netanyahu, in return, may have been warned that in return for his prize, he will be expected to deliver support for the plan Trump’s team plans to proffer. For decades, the Western world has allowed fear of Palestinian terrorism (or Palestinians backing out of negotiations) to silence claims that everyone knows to be true.Such capitulation serves no one. It doesn’t serve the West, for it renders even the U.S. impotent in the face of Palestinian threat.It doesn’t help Israel, which wants the world to acknowledge that its capital being near the seat of King David’s kingdom and the location of the two Temples symbolizes with utter clarity that the Jews have returned home.And it doesn’t serve the Palestinians, who through the use of threat, have immobilized the West and put off the serious deliberations they will have to undertake if they are ever to get the state they want.Whether the president has the focus, skill and interest in making this move the beginning of a positive and far-reaching process, though, remains to be seen.Daniel Gordis is senior vice president and Koret distinguished fellow at Shalem College in Jerusalem. Categories: Editorial, OpinionCalling it a “recognition of reality” and “the right thing to do,” President Donald Trump announced Wednesday that the U.S. was recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, and that the American Embassy will be moved from Tel Aviv to the contested city.The announcement leaves many questions, two of which are primary. Trump’s core supporters will likely stick by him through thick and thin.But there have to be some religious voters who find the president’s open endorsement of Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore — widely believed to have forced underage women into sexual encounters — distasteful to say the least.The Russia investigation looms, as do increasing questions about whether Trump, his family or his innermost circle may be legally vulnerable.It hasn’t been a good period for the president; if Trump was looking for a diversion, he seems to have landed on an effective one.There is one much less cynical, although unlikely, possibility that deserves mention.Trump has long said he will forge a deal between Israelis and Palestinians, and rumors on the street are that the “key principles” of his team’s agreement are emerging.Accounts vary. If anyone can deliver the Israeli right, it is Netanyahu, likely the most skilled political manipulator the country has had as prime minister.With his political life possibly nearing its end and with little to show for his years in office, Netanyahu would like a deal like this to ensure his place in history.How likely is this scenario?It’s hard to say.A careful plan in which the Trump moves slowly and stays on script would hardly be characteristic of his modus operandi so far. But it’s not entirely out of the question.Trump, not surprisingly, is taking heat from all corners, including Palestinians, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May, Christian leaders in Israel and even the liberal American Jewish community.Yet even if he was motivated primarily by his own selfish needs, Trump is right — he did the right thing. The first is whether violence will ensue.The Palestinians and Turks are making threats, and Israel’s security establishment is said to be on alert.But many Israelis are dismissing the dangers of what they call “Trumpocalypse.”Unlike hypothetical steps, such as assigning the Palestinians a smaller state than they demand or ending U.S. support for a two-state solution, recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital changes nothing on the ground.Many Israelis and even Palestinians thus doubt that, grandstanding aside, the Palestinians would risk much in response to a statement merely acknowledges what the world has long known to be true.The other major question is, “Why now?”Theories abound, of course, but the most obvious explanation is that Trump is seeking both a diversion from his growing problems at home and a bone to throw to his evangelical Christian and Orthodox Jewish base before his support there erodes. More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

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La Liga Likely to Restart by End of May, Says Tebas

first_imgHe estimates clubs could lose 1bn euros if the current campaign is cancelled.Tebas revealed three start dates are currently being discussed with Uefa, saying: “Of all the different scenarios we have been looking at with Uefa to go back to competing, the most probable ones are 28 May, 6 June or 28 June,” he said.“We can’t say an exact date. This will be given to us by the authorities in Spain. But we still have time to get back to training before that.”Tebas says La Liga is not contemplating a failure to complete the domestic campaign, which still has 11 rounds of matches to play.However, having done the maths, Tebas is conscious that even if games are played with supporters in stadiums, a scenario he does not feel is likely in the short term, the losses will be extreme.He said: “If we are looking at the economic impact, including the money we would get from European competitions, the revenue Spanish clubs would miss out on if we don’t get back playing again is 1bn euros. If we do get playing but without spectators, it would be 300m.“Even if we get back to playing with spectators, the damage this situation has already caused would be 150m.”Uefa has urged individual leagues not to follow Belgium’s example by scrapping competitions – and warned they risk not being allowed into next season’s European competition if they do.A working group – which also includes representatives from the European Clubs’ Association and the European Leagues – expects to have a proposal to put forward by the middle of May.Tebas says two strategies are being worked on.One involves domestic league matches being played at weekends and European and general cup competitions in midweek. The second is to play blocks of fixtures, with domestic competitions being finished in June and July, before European games are played in July and August.With uncertainty over when the current restrictions across Europe will be lifted, Tebas said it was “logical” some leagues may start before others.“If they can start, they should,” he said, while stating some clubs may not be able to play games at their own stadiums due to planned construction work.Tebas was careful not to state any date by which the 2019-20 season must be finished.However, he spoke regularly about August being a finishing point and underlined why, no matter when the campaign eventually ends, scrapping and altering tournaments next season to create space for a full league programme is fraught with difficulty.“It is much more complicated than just making a decision,” he said.“Each country is different. In England, you have three competitions. In Spain and Italy it is two. There are 18 teams in the German league but all the others have 20.“The leagues who have problems in their calendar should look for internal solutions. If that is impossible, we might need some kind of co-ordination with Uefa but at the moment, we are not considering changing formats.“Think about the top leagues. We have sold our broadcasting rights based on certain formats. We have 20 clubs and 380 matches played during a specific period of time.“Uefa has also sold its rights based on a format, including the qualifiers and the group phase. This applies to everyone.”Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram La Liga could resume as early as 28 May in the best-case scenario as the league discusses its options, says its President Javier Tebas.No Spanish side has played a competitive game since 11 March, when Atletico Madrid knocked holders Liverpool out of the Champions League.Tebas says training will not return until emergency measures – in place until 26 April – are lifted in Spain.last_img read more

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