Celebrate Pi Day With a Pizza Pi(e)!

first_imgUncategorized Celebrate Pi Day With a Pizza Pi(e)! From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 | 11:02 am Community News 6 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Business News Make a comment To how many decimals can you recite Pi? For some of the more gifted residents of Pasadena, we imagine it can get pretty high. For most of us, it’s simply two: 3.14.So did you know that there’s a whole holiday dedicated to one of the most important numbers in the world? March 14th, a.k.a. 3.14, is National Pi Day.In celebration, Blaze Pizza is offering all of their pizzas for just $3.14!And while you’re enjoying your cheap but delicious pizza, you can enter their Instagram contest. Every 314th guest who Instagrams a #BlazePizza selfie or we-fie (in others words, a normal picture) wins 10 free pizza passes!So here’s what you do: Snap a photo of yourself with the pizza and post it on Instagram, adding #BlazePizza in the caption. Publicly post your photo between 12 a.m. and 11:59 p.m. on March 14th. If you’re the 314th poster, you win!Join in on the fun this Saturday!Blaze Pizza is located at 35 N Lake Avenue Suite 710 Pasadena. For more information, call (626) 584-5880 or visit www.blazepizza.com. More Cool Stuff Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimescenter_img Subscribe Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday First Heatwave Expected Next Week HerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCreative Ways To Burn Calories That Require Little EffortHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Special Beauty Tips That Make Indian Women So BeautifulHerbeautyHerbeauty Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Top of the News last_img read more

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POCSO Act : Kerala High Court Upholds Constitutionality Of Reverse Burden Of Proof Under Sections 29 & 30

first_imgNews UpdatesPOCSO Act : Kerala High Court Upholds Constitutionality Of Reverse Burden Of Proof Under Sections 29 & 30 LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK12 Nov 2020 12:12 AMShare This – xIn a notable judgment, the Kerala High Court has upheld the constitutional validity of Sections 29 and 30 of the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act(POCSO Act) which creates a reverse burden of proof on the accused.A single bench of Justice Sunil Thomas rejected the arguments that these provisions violated fundamental rights under Articles 14, 20(3) and 21 of the Constitution…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginIn a notable judgment, the Kerala High Court has upheld the constitutional validity of Sections 29 and 30 of the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act(POCSO Act) which creates a reverse burden of proof on the accused.A single bench of Justice Sunil Thomas rejected the arguments that these provisions violated fundamental rights under Articles 14, 20(3) and 21 of the Constitution of India.The Court noted that statutes imposing limited burden on the accused to establish certain facts which are specifically within his knowledge are not rare in Indian Criminal Law.  It further held such provisions cannot be held to be unconstitutional due to the fact that they reverse the burden of proof from the prosecution to the accused if they are “justifiable on the ground of predominant public interest”.”Parliament is competent to place burden on certain aspects on the accused, especially those which are within his exclusive knowledge. It is justified on the ground that, the prosecution cannot, in the very nature of things be expected to know the affairs of the accused. This is specifically so in the case of sexual offences, where there may not be any eye witness to the incident. Even the burden on accused is also a partial one and is justifiable on larger public interest”, the Court observed.The Court observed that these provisions do not absolve the prosecution of the burden to establish “foundational facts” of the crime and that the reverse burden kicks in only when such “foundational facts” are established. Also, it is open to the accused to rebut the presumption on the basis of preponderance of probabilities.The court explained that the foundational facts in a POCSO case include “the proof that the victim is a child, that alleged incident has taken place, that the accused has committed the offence and whenever physical injury is caused, to establish it with supporting medical evidence”.”The insistence on establishment of foundational facts by prosecution acts as a safety guard against misapplication of statutory presumptions”, the Court observed repelling the constitutional challenge raised in two petitions filed by Justin @ Renjith and Ashly Tomi, who were facing investigation for POCSO offences The challenge on the ground Article 14The petitioners argued that the reverse burden for sexual offences against children was discriminatory as such a provision was not there in cases of sexual offences against adults.The Court held that POCSO Act was implemented for the protection of children following the mandate of Article 15(3) of the Constitution.”Since POCSO Act was implemented to achieve the mandate under Article 15(3) of the Constitution for providing special protection to children, POCSO Act cannot be challenged on the ground that it offends Article 14 of the Constitution. Further, treating the child victims as constituting a class by itself, is based on an intelligible differentia, and is  meant to achieve the object of the Statute. Hence the statutory provisions do not offend Article 14″.The Court also rejected the argument that mens rea must be an essential ingredient of every offence.”Such offences involve varying degree of physical interference on the victim or penetrative act, which if done, by itself explicitly exhibits a sexual intent and hence, mens rea is mplied in the conduct of the agressor itself. Hence it need not even be specifically established by the prosecution. Hence Parliament has consciously omitted the ingredient of sexual intent from the above offences, since that mental element is implied in the very nature of the crime. Hence the contentions of the learned counsel for the petitioners that, mens rea is not made as an important ingredient of offence and hence the Act is contrary to the basic tenents of criminal jurisprudence is not sustainable”.The challenge on the ground of Article 20(3)The petitioners argued that Sections 29 and 30 violated the right to silence of the accused. Referring to the Supreme Court decision in State of Bombay v Kathi Kalu Oghadu the High Court held that Article 20(3) will operate only when the accused is put under duress to give evidence against himself. This argument was rejected by the Court saying ‘compulsion’ in the context of Article 20(3) means duress.”To bring such evidence within the mischief of Art.20(3), it must be shown that accused was under a compulsion to give evidence and that the evidence had a material bearing on the criminality of the maker. Supreme Court explained that, compulsion in the context must mean duress”, the Court observed.”Tendering of the oral evidence by accused is not mandatory or essential. To that extent, the apprehension of the petitioners that, sections 29 and 30 of POCSO Act violate Art.20(3) of the Constitution is misplaced”, the Court added.The challenge on the ground of Article 21The petitioners argued that the impugned provisions took away the right to presumption of innocence under Article 21 of the Constitution. In this regard,the Court observed that the provisions do not take away the obligation of the prosecution to establish the foundational facts.The Court said:”Though, it may appear that in the light of presumptions, the burden of proof oscillate between the prosecution and the accused, depending on the quality of evidence let in, in practice the process of adducing evidence in a POCSO case does not substantially differ from any other criminal trial. Once the recording of prosecution evidence starts, the cross examination of the witnesses will have to be undertaken by the accused keeping in mind the duty of the accused to demolish the prosecution case by an effective cross examination and additionally to elicit facts to rebut the statutory presumptions that may arise from the evidence of prosecution witnesses. Practically, the duty of prosecution to establish the foundational facts and the duty of accused to rebut presumptions arise, with the commencement of trial, progresses forward along with the trial and establishment of one, extinguishes the other. To that extent, the presumptions and the duty to rebut presumptions are co-extensive”. Click here to Read/Download JudgmentNext Storylast_img read more

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RFA Fort Victoria to Help Australians Fight Pirates

first_img View post tag: Victoria Back to overview,Home naval-today RFA Fort Victoria to Help Australians Fight Pirates View post tag: Fort RFA Fort Victoria to Help Australians Fight Pirates View post tag: Pirates View post tag: fight View post tag: Defence Training & Education View post tag: RFA View post tag: News by topiccenter_img October 8, 2013 View post tag: Naval View post tag: Help View post tag: Navy View post tag: Defense Share this article View post tag: Australians Delivering enough fuel in an hour to fill the tanks of over 5,400 family cars, support ship RFA Fort Victoria tops up frigate HMAS Melbourne to sustain the ongoing fight against piracy and terrorism.Fort Vic can pump 700,000 litres of fuel an hour during a replenishment at sea – enough to fill the tanks of more than 12,500 Ford Focuses.Melbourne needed less than half that to support her ongoing maritime security patrol, Operation Slipper – the Australian counterpart to Britain’s Operation Kipion, our east of Suez mission.“Bringing 4,800 tonnes of metal together at 12 knots, less than 50 metres from 33,675 tonnes of metal, requires focus and ship handling skills,”said Cdr Brian Schlegel, HMAS Melbourne’s CO.“Operating in this part of the world in hot conditions takes its toll on the personnel on the upper decks during a RAS.“That is something we have to remain cognisant of when working in hot environments. Overall this was a safe and successful RAS with Fort Victoria.”The RFA ship is the command ship of Combined Task Force 151, led for the first time by a Royal Navy team headed by Cdre Jeremy Blunden.The force, half a dozen vessels including the Melbourne, is charged with strangling piratical activity across 2½ million square miles of ocean, as well as clamping down on any other criminal activities the ships encounter – smuggling, terrorism, people trafficking.This was the first RAS between the British auxiliary and the Australian warship; the Melbourne has just arrived in theatre, taking over from HMAS Newcastle in the 56th rotation of a Royal Australian Navy vessel to the Middle East region since the beginning of the first Gulf War in 1990.The new arrival hosted a team from Fort Vic to discuss the current piracy threat and ways in which the task force will deter and disrupt any modern-day buccaneers operating off the Horn of Africa.“HMAS Newcastle worked tirelessly over the past months to engage with the local maritime community and show our global resolution to combat the piracy problem,”said Cdre Blunden.“This is echoed by the new team onboard HMAS Melbourne who are well prepared for this important mission and ready to carry on the same good work as her predecessor.”In return the RFA ship hosted some of the Australians to give them a taste of life and kit aboard a British military vessel.“It was refreshing to see a ship from another Navy and to compare the Australian Navy systems and procedures to the Royal Navy,”said AB Luke Luong RAN.“It is clear that we stem from the same naval heritage.”[mappress]Press Release, October 08, 2013; Image: Royal Navylast_img read more

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