FIREBALLING: Henderson carries on family tradition

first_img12345PrevNextStartStop Book Nook to reopen Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Print Article Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits By Jaine Treadwell By The Penny Hoarder Skip The darkness of Saturday night was diminished by the yellow/orange light of fireballs zooming through the air, bounding across the pasture and being tossed from one to another. Seemingly, there were more throwers/catchers than ever before.“Harold and I were so busy lighting the fireballs that I really didn’t notice, but my brothers thought is was the largest number of people we have ever had,” Currie said. “It was fun, as it always is. Hopefully and prayerfully, we’ll be able to continue with fireballing. It is a family tradition and a community tradition.”For 28 of the fireball throwing years, Barbara Currie has wound buckets of cotton thread into tightly wound balls and then put them into kerosene to soak for up to three months to be ready for fire balling. But she has turned the winding of the balls over to two nieces and she just lights them and puts them to play along with her husband, Harold. Latest Stories Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Email the author You Might Like WORK FOR IT: Trojans help with chores to raise funds Members of the Charles Henderson basketball team have to pay for their own shoes and jerseys – the equipment isn’t… read more Sponsored Content Published 9:10 pm Monday, January 6, 2020 FIREBALLING: Henderson carries on family tradition Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Patriot Health ZoneHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential Health32-second Stretch Ends Back Pain & Sciatica (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Norma Turner of Brundidge is a more recent fire ball thrower.“Fireball throwing was new to me,” she said. “The first time I came I was a little hesitant to try picking up a flaming ball but once I tried it, I was hooked,” Turner said. “I it’s a different way to celebrate New Year’s or Christmas. It’s family fun and it’s community fun and I want it to be part of my family tradition.”Turner said she brought several new fireballers along and they were hooked on the first catch and throw.“Those who say fireball throwing is teaching kids to play with fire are wrong,” she said. “Kids know that fireballing is a one-time a year thing and that they must be with an adult and respect what fire could do.”Currie agreed. “We’re not teaching children to play with fire,” she said. “We’re teaching them about traditions.Fireball throwing started in America in the early 1920s but the tradition probably originated “across the big pond” as early as the 16th or 17th centuries. A tradition worth preserving? Just ask anyone who has ever been fireballing. The fireballs have to be made from 100 percent cotton,” Currie said. “I can remember Mother telling how her family would sit around the fireplace during the long winter nights and unravel their old socks and wind the strings into fireballs. Back then, the fireballs were thrown on the Fourth of July and Christmas, too, — a poor man’s fireworks.”Currie said it’s difficult to find “all-cotton” socks these days, so she relies on crocheting yarn for her fireballs.“I start with an old sock for the core of each fireball,” Currie said. “I’d just wad it up and then start tightly winding yarn around the sock. At some point, I’d stop winding and start stitching. If you don’t sew the balls together, they will fall apart when they start burning.”But not one of the 40 fireballs for 2020 fell apart. And not one person left the fire ball throwing disappointed. The locals and others, pulled their vehicles onto the Enon roadway Saturday night and people spilled out like jelly beans out of jar. They made a beeline to the balls of fire that littered the pasture, grabbed a ball of fire and, “chunked it.” For 30 years now, the Willie Henderson family has been hosting a community fireball throwing some time during the Christmas/New Year’s holidays, depending on the  weather, ball games and other major things.Barbara Henderson Currie, said fireball throwing is more of a tradition in her mother’s family, the Ingrams, than in her dad’s But the tradition of fireballing is deeply rooted in the Elon/Josie communities thanks to Barbara Currie and her brothers Dennis, Durwood, Dwight and David. Each winter holiday season, the brothers bush hog the pasture, open the gate and “throw” a community party like no other. last_img read more

Continue reading

Phish Redeems Forgettable First Set With Stellar “Everything’s Right” > “Down With Disease” In Austin

first_imgFollowing a first frame that offered little to write home about, the burning question that loomed over the setbreak chatter asked if this show was bound for mediocrity, or if it would be A Tale of Two Sets, with the second half coming in strong to relieve a forgettable set one. When Phish returned from the intermission and launched into new-ish tune “Everything’s Right”, the question still lingered. But as the band drove the song deeper and deeper, all doubts quickly dissipated.Over the course of the jam’s nearly 20 minutes, the band explored a number of major-key spaces, briefly hinting at a segue into “What’s The Use?” before continuing to forge ahead, blazing to a peak and, finally, dropping somewhat awkwardly back into the song’s final refrain. This rendition of “Everything’s Right” marked Phish’s 7th rendition of the tune since its pre-Dozen debut last year, and easily eclipsed the previous 6 as the deepest and most interesting version to date.“Down With Disease” was up next, marking its third outing of the summer. It may be worth noting that every “Disease” this summer has now appeared on the setlist alongside “Everything’s Right”, and vice versa (Tahoe 2, L.A. 1)—not that it holds any particular significance, but Phish kids do love looking for trends. Most shows spell something, after all. Clocking in at just over 17 minutes in length, this “Disease” stacked up admirably against this summer’s prior two run-throughs. Gordon handled the heavy lifting as the band jettisoned into Type II space. Around the 8-minute mark, the jam settled into an ambient quiver, Mike laying the foundation while Trey painted in the lines with frugal guitar ornaments. The jam got darker from there as Fish showed off his technical prowess behind the kit, bolstering the Baker’s Dozen-style cocktail lounge groove with a relentless, complex backbeat while the band settled in around him.After several more minutes of eerie ambience, the jam faded out around Fishman’s cymbal-heavy drum pattern, giving way to the pulsing bounce of “Steam”. The song built rapidly with some Haunted House scream samples, Trey wailing away with abandon. Before long, the jam disappeared as steam, giving way to “Seven Below”, another tune not played since the Baker’s Dozen’s coconut-flavored opening night. On this hot Texas night, “Seven Below” turned the heat up even higher, pushing through major-key space to an anthemic climax before petering out into “Dirt”. This “Dirt” came just four shows after its 2018 debut on night one at the Bill Graham, marking the shortest gap between “Dirts” in 15 years.Another recently played tune, “The Wedge”, came in next after a 3 show gap, marking its third performance of the summer. After a quick bob along the surface, the second “Wilson” of the summer provided the set with a fourth-quarter espresso shot. The band maintained that energy for an always-welcome “Run Like An Antelope” set closer, before rounding out the show with a sing-along “Loving Cup” encore.Phish summer tour continues this weekend as the band heads to Alpharetta, GA for their sold-out three-night run at Verizon Amphitheatre. For a full list of Phish’s upcoming tour dates, head to their website.Setlist: Phish | Austin360 Amphitheatre | Del Valle, TX | 7/31/18Set 1: Sample in a Jar, Light, The Moma Dance, Funky Bitch, Heavy Things, Theme From the Bottom, Brian and Robert, Halfway to the Moon, The Line, I Didn’t Know, 46 DaysSet 2: Everything’s Right > Down with Disease[1] > Steam > Seven Below > Dirt > The Wedge, Wilson > Run Like an AntelopeEncore: Loving CupA full soundboard recording of the show is available to stream now via LivePhish. On Tuesday night, Phish tour rolled into Texas for a one-off performance at Austin360 Amphitheatre, the 10th show on their ongoing 2018 summer tour.After the tour’s ”front nine” produced notably strong first frames across the board, Austin’s first set played much more like, well, a first set. “Sample In A Jar” got the evening started—as it so often does—making its first live appearance since it opened the now-storied “Jam-Filled” show at last summer’s Baker’s Dozen. This 26-show gap marked the longest stretch of shows without a “Sample” since the song’s debut in 1993, setting a trend that would continue throughout the night. “Light” got a somewhat surprising nod in the two-spot, the go-to 3.0 jam vehicle appearing in the first set for the first time since Mexico 2016. After a brief flirtation with some Type I improv, the band opted for “The Moma Dance”, their third version of the summer. While this version failed to reach the heights of the set one “Moma” from the tour opener in Tahoe (or, for that matter, the rendition that kicked off a top-notch set two at BGCA night 1), it did provide a fun, funky interlude paired with the short but searing “Funky Bitch” that followed.Following “Funky Bitch”, guitarist Trey Anastasio, who himself was born Texas, took a moment to address his fellow Texas natives in the audience. “Thanks, everybody. We’re so happy to be in Texas,” he mused. “I gotta ask one question before we go on here. I know a lot of people move to Austin from different parts of the country. I’m just curious: How many, um, real Texans—meaning you were born in Texas—are in the audience? Put your hands up! Thank you. Real Texans. 1964. Fort Worth Children’s Hospital. Texas…in the house.”After a long pause, the band opted for “Heavy Things”, Page McConnell highlighting this mostly straightforward reading on the piano. From there, “Theme From The Bottom” bubbled up to the surface, offering some well-wrangled instrumental conversation between Page and Trey as the song patiently built to its a cappella bridge. The set continued relatively unremarkably with a trio of tunes not played since the Baker’s Dozen, “Brian and Robert”, “Halfway to the Moon”, and everyone’s favorite Fuego pariah, “The Line”. Like the “Sample” that opened the set, this “Line” ended the longest gap the song has seen since its debut (23 shows), a year and two days after its last showing on Cinnamon night.Yet another “not seen since the Dozen” tune came next in “I Didn’t Know”, giving Jon Fishman (and “Moses Heaps, Moses Brown, and Moses DeWitt”) an opening for his (their?) first vacuum solo of the summer. As the Electrolux sucked Fish’s face, Mike Gordon amusingly executed an onstage wardrobe change, losing his shoes and, subsequently, his pants (don’t worry, he had shorts on underneath) before re-tying his shoes and making it back to the mic in time for his vocal cue. Finally, “46 Days” brought the set to a close, the coals smoldering behind dextrous guitar work from Trey but never quite igniting in earnest.last_img read more

Continue reading

Revealed! Arsenal’s Invincibles always fighting in training

first_imgArsenal’s Invincibles were always fighting in training, according to former Gunners defender Lauren. Promoted ContentWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Meet The World’s Most Striking Animals HereWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?Fantastic-Looking (and Probably Delicious) Bread Art5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks7 Reasons Why You Might Want To Become A Vegetarian7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayThe Highest Paid Football Players In The WorldThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More10 Awesome 2019 Movies You Probably Missed7 Mysterious Discoveries Archaeologists Still Can’t Explain Loading… Arsene Wenger masterminded a squad full of quality and character to the league title in the 2003/04 season, going undefeated. And while there was joy and happiness at the end of it, things weren’t always so rosy during. That’s according to Cameroonian full-back Lauren, who has revealed just how competitive things were at the club. He even admitted to being involved in a scrap with Gunners legend Thierry Henry. Speaking to the Arsenal website, the 43-year-old said: “Of course there was fighting. I love at Arsenal that the journalists didn’t go to the training sessions. “In our time if the journalists were to attend training there would be history every single day. “How competitive we were – all fighting between ourselves. I had a fight with Thierry [Henry], Thierry with Martin [Keown], Patrick with Freddie [Ljungberg]. “We were all very competitive and we were all fighting because we all had big egos, big personalities but by the time the games arrived, we were fighting for the same goal.” Lauren admitted that Wenger was the glue that held all the “big egos” together, and brought them to the stunning success. He added: “You need that, big egos but you have the manager as well that knows how to control the big egos, how to control those players. “I prefer to be in a team that you see players face to face, you can talk to him, tell him whatever you want. “But when the games arrive you will be 100 per cent for the same goal, to achieve what we set out to do at the beginning of the season. “This is the most important thing; without that, it is difficult to win things. “I don’t want to be in a team that nothing happens, we’re all quiet, if you win no problem, if you lose no problem. You can’t compete like that. “In our time we were all competitive, we were all fighting between each other. “But at the end of the day we were fighting for the same goal and that’s why we managed to win things.” Arsenal became the first team to ever go undefeated in a 38-game season. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

Continue reading

NFF Debunks Shortchanged of S’Eagles Report

first_img“Sometimes in March this year, the NFF held a meeting with some technical crew members, team captain and vice captain, on behalf of the team, and told them to open bank accounts (in Nigeria) as the Federation was no longer disposed to paying cash. It was also at that meeting that the NFF told them they would no longer be paid in dollars for home matches, and that the win bonus for home match was a flat rate of N1million. The meeting took place at the team’s hotel in Kaduna and I was present at the meeting.“It was based on this that the players were paid the sum of N500,000 each for the draw against Egypt in Kaduna (2017 Cup of Nations qualifier, March 2016) and the sum of N1million each for the win against Tanzania in Uyo (2017 Cup of Nations qualifier, September 2016). Their camp allowance has also been paid in naira (N50,000 per day) since March 2016.”Achor also confirmed that for away matches, the players are entitled to the sum of $5,000 at the official rate obtaining at the time of match.“The NFF has not shortchanged the players. The match against Algeria was a home match. Whenever the win bonus for the match against Zambia in Ndola is being paid, it would be $5,000 per player at the official rate that obtained at the time the match was played.”The federation has been in the news for wrong reasons in th3 recent time in spite of success the country had achieved especially in the last three months.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Femi SolajaThe Nigeria Football Federation has denied a report that it shortchanged players of the Super Eagles with regards to payment of their win bonus for the 2018 FIFA World Cup qualifying match against Algeria in Uyo in November 2016.Eagles’ Team Administrator Dayo Enebi Achor confirmed yesterday that contrary to the report in the media, the federation paid all the players all that was due to them: “That report is a fabrication. The estimate we sent to the Government was for the sum of N1million for each player for a win. Nobody has been shortchanged.last_img read more

Continue reading