Housing Leaders Praise Supreme Court LGBTQ Decision

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / Housing Leaders Praise Supreme Court LGBTQ Decision Related Articles Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Share Save  Print This Post Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Diversity mortgage 2020-06-19 Seth Welborn Tagged with: Diversity mortgage Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. June 19, 2020 1,102 Views Previous: Mortgage Forbearances Down by 57,000 Next: Appraisals at a Distance The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Housing Leaders Praise Supreme Court LGBTQ Decisioncenter_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago About Author: Seth Welborn Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Supreme Court ruled that LGBTQ workers are protected under existing civil rights laws after a move praised by mortgage industry leaders, including members of the American Mortgage Diversity Council (AMDC).AMDC Chair Lola Oyewole, VP, Human Resources and Chief Diversity & Inclusion of Ocwen Financial Corporation said, “This is a historic moment for the LGBTQ+ community, extending protections aimed at prohibiting discrimination is a positive step towards the change we all need and deserve.”“Diversity and Inclusion is inherent in Aspen’s values and culture and we strongly believe that a diverse workforce enhances our product and service offerings to our clients, brings new ideas and thinking and drives inclusion and motivation across the business,” said Ed Buckley, Brand Ambassador at Aspen Grove Solutions. “In a perfect world we would not need laws to protect against discrimination, but as we live in an imperfect world, it is great to see these protections being solidified.”The AMDC also discussed homeownership and workplace challenges faced by the LGBTQ community in a white paper, which you can read here.In response to the Supreme Court’s decision, Jodi Gaines, Chief Client Officer for Insight One Financial, stated, “As Vice Chair of AMDC, I am proud of all the work our group is doing to raise awareness, provide education and training, as well as making sure everyone has a voice and is treated fairly—simply put, doing the right thing. It is through these types of efforts and more that we will continue to make progress and improvements. There is still much work to be done however I’m confident we are heading in the right direction.”“Those of us doing the work of diversity, equity, and inclusion, as well as those who are champions for justice, know that terminations based on identity are wrong,” said AMDC Advisory Council member Charmaine Brown, Sr. Consultant, Alignment Strategies. “This is a big victory that must now be guarded to ensure enforcement. The AMDC previously held town halls with the LGBTQ community and leaders in 2017 and released a white paper which validated the discrimination faced by our LGBTQ fellow human beings in housing and employment. I encourage you to read the report and share it with your leadership teams.To learn more about the AMDC’s research and advocacy in the LQBTQ space, click here. Subscribelast_img read more

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The Mesoamerican attraction to magnetism

first_img Radcliffe fellow heads a team helping preserve the ancient city of Nicomedia in modern-day Turkey New tool aids in sensing magnetic fields Uncovering an ancient world The purpose of Mesoamerican potbelly statues have been the subject of debate among anthropologists for decades: Are they depictions of the ruling elite? A way to honor dead ancestors? Or perhaps portrayals of women giving birth?As the various theories wound their way through academic circles, the surprising discovery four decades ago that many of the statues, found in Guatemala, are magnetized in certain spots added a new dimension to those discussions.And a Harvard study suggests that where those areas show up is no accident.Led by Assistant Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences Roger Fu, a team of researchers has shown that artisans carved the figures so that the magnetic areas fell at the navel or right temple — suggesting not only that Mesoamerican people were familiar with the concept of magnetism but also that they had some way of detecting the magnetized spots. The study is described in an April 12 paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.“Our direct observation is that there are magnetic anomalies consistently on certain features of these sculptures,” Fu said. “And the question we asked is whether this is consistent with random chance, or does it require some knowledge or some awareness of where those anomalies are?“There’s some chance it could happen randomly, but as we find more and more sculptures that are aligned like this, the smaller than likelihood is,” he continued. “In this paper, we looked at four, and we found a less than 1 percent chance that this wasn’t intentional.”A close study of the anomalies, Fu said, showed they could only have been caused by one source — lightning.“All rocks contain magnetic minerals,” he said. “If you go outside and pick up any random rock, it is magnetic. It’s just very, very weakly magnetic. These rocks are basalts from the highlands of Guatemala, and they happen to contain quite a bit of magnetite, as well as other magnetic minerals.”Rocks typically become magnetized as they cool, and minerals like magnetite, hematite, and iron sulfides become aligned with Earth’s magnetic field. While that process can create detectable magnetic fields, Fu said they are usually not even strong enough to move a compass needle.The fields found in the statues, however, are far stronger — in some cases nearly four times that of the Earth’s magnetic field.,“What happened here is that these rocks were struck by lightning sometime between when they were formed many thousands of years ago, and when they were carved,” Fu said. “Because lightning is an electric current, it produces very strong magnetic fields, many orders of magnitude stronger than normal … and we believe the ancient Mesoamerican people were able to detect these anomalies.”It’s uncertain exactly how they detected the anomalies, but earlier research had turned up evidence that Mesoamericans may have used lodestones — naturally magnetized rocks — for a variety of purposes.“In one case, in 1975, people discovered a hematite-rich bar,” Fu said. “Its purpose was unknown, and it was broken, but it was clearly very carefully made.“If you were to tie it on a string or float it on a piece of wood, it actually could act as a compass needle,” he added. “If the makers of these sculptures had access to a tool like that, that’s one way they could have detected them.”And though the study suggests that ancient Mesoamerican people had knowledge of magnetism and how to detect it, it leaves unanswered the question of why the figures were carved to highlight their magnetism.“The short answer is we don’t have a good idea for the exact reason they did this,” Fu said. “There are some hypotheses which are quite intriguing … that involve digging into why we think people made these sculptures.“Probably the most successful idea is that they might represent some depiction of the ancestors of the ruling elites,” he continued. “The idea is: If you have some claim to power, sculptures of your ancestors with strong magnetic anomalies could appear very impressive to your subjects. The word people use in the literature is that there’s a performative aspect to these sculptures, so when the sculptures deflected a magnetized stone, it would appear as though there was something alive with it, or some supernatural aspect to it.”Ultimately, Fu said, the study offers key evidence that an understanding of magnetism existed in the Americas far earlier than first believed. It uses NV centers to detect them in various directions Related “In the Old World, there was some documentation of magnetism in the Greek world by the sixth century B.C., and the first usable compass wasn’t until centuries later in China,” he said. “To me, what’s really interesting is this is a completely independent discovery. There’s a perception that the Old World is the advanced world and transferred all this knowledge to the New one, but we are realizing that they knew a lot, and I think this is one more piece of evidence for that.”This research was supported with funding from NASA.last_img read more

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£2bn race to beat duty rise

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Celebrate cup from trackside unit

first_img“Ascot House residents will … benefit from the amazing lifestyle amenities on their doorstep including the restaurant-lined Racecourse Rd.” Damien Nielsen, his wife Jane and their sons Hunter, 8, and Archie, 5.Melbourne Cup fan Damien Nielsen, his wife Jane and their young sons moved into Mirvac’s Ascot Green development’s first stage, Ascot House, in July. Taringa design capitalises on Brisbane city view Mr Nielsen said initially he wasn’t sure he and the family would be able to embrace the apartment lifestyle.“Initially, I was 50/50, I had a foot either side,” he said. >>FOLLOW EMILY BLACK ON FACEBOOK<< Families opt for apartments, over house and land Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:46Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:46 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenChoosing an apartment to invest in01:47 Developer ditched cookie-cutter design at West End community Ascot Green is part of the overall $1.2 billion Eagle Farm masterplan.“We still owned a house, but we bought the unit and I gave my wife the option to move in and she jumped at the opportunity.“I had reservations when we let our house and I hadn’t agreed to a lease with anyone and when we moved in I really did see the benefits.”“I only realised then how much your house actually encumbers you.” The first stage consists of Ascot House, which was completed this year and will also include Tulloch House a second tower adjacent to Ascot House with similar amenities, apartment product and expansive views across the track, with construction yet to begin.Mr Nielsen said while the racecourse wasn’t running races for this year’s Melbourne Cup event, if it was they would have a great view from their apartment.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours ago“I always attend Melbourne Cup events in Brisbane. I am not an every weekend punter, but I certainly go to all the major events,” he said.“We were very lucky, we registered interest to buy the unit, when it first went public.“When we moved into the area nearly 20 years ago, we knew of the development, and I said to my wife that we’d always buy a unit there, regardless.”Mr Nielsen said at the time he purchased he was able to secure a unit with the view he wanted, which was a winning post view with the main straight. “We bought it straight away.” Ascot House has an 800sq m roof terrace and elevated pool deck overlooking the racetrack.He said since moving in, they had cemented themselves with the local community through the use of local communal spaces.“The development has a very spacious rooftop terrace with a large pool, and then we have the use of … a large grass area running against the racecourse, and the Brisbane Racing Club has generously let us use the areas around the racecourse.“There is still some very big parkland areas and I can spend more time there outside kicking a football and there are more areas to do it. “Whereas in a backyard on a 600sq m block, if you kick the ball hard enough it will be over the neighbour’s fence, but now I can kick and throw as I go and the boys can go chase it.”Mirvac Queensland residential development general manager Warwick Bible said Ascot Green was geared towards owner-occupiers. MORE: Mr Nielsen said when the family had lived in their five-bedroom house, Hunter, 8, and Archie, 5, shared a bedroom, as they continue to do in the three-bedroom apartment.“I’ve made them bunk up together … just so they could learn to share,” he said.“It teaches them important skills.” Inside one of the Ascot House apartments.“They are seeking generous floorplans, extra-large balconies and open outlooks, making Ascot House incredibly attractive,” Mr Bible said. RELATED:last_img read more

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