Landscape wonder

first_imgImazapyr (“Arsenal” and others).Clopyralid and triclopyr (“Confront”).2,4-D (various brand names).Glufosinate (“Finale”).Glyphosate (“Roundup” and others).Triclopyr (“Brush-B-Gone” and others). All of these herbicides work best when applied to actively growing plants. All can be applied to foliage, but triclopyr, glyphosate and imazapyr can also be applied to cut stems.For example, if the plant is creeping up a wall or tree, it’s in your best interest to cut a 12-inch section of the stem and remove it. Everything above the cut should die, but the plant below the cut could resprout.To prevent resprouting, spray or paint the stems immediately after you cut them. When you’re making this cut-stem application, most herbicide manufacturers recommend using the herbicide at full or 50-percent strength. Refer to the product label for the correct directions.Best time to sprayIt’s best to apply these three herbicides in late summer or early fall.Imazapyr, glufosinate and glyphosate are nonselective herbicides, so take care to prevent spray drift from contacting desirable plants.Clopyralid, triclopyr and 2,4-D are safe to use in turf grasses, but take care to prevent spray drift from contacting plants sensitive to these herbicides. Always refer to herbicide labels for application information.Check treated plants periodically to make sure you get complete control. You may need to reapply. By Wayne McLaurinand Mark CzarnotaUniversity of GeorgiaThe hottest things in the landscape now are “new” and native plants. Well, there are no new plants — just the ones we don’t know about. However, one native plant is truly underappreciated.This plant can be propagated by both cuttings and seed. And no one ever fertilizes it. It seems perfectly happy with just native soils and their inherent fertility.Besides this low fertility requirement, it also has all of the sought-after characteristics of a Xeriscape plant. Nobody waters it. It seems to thrive in the drought and heat. Fantastic ground coverIt grows as a fantastic ground cover. It can cover an area in a single year. It’s not subject to any disease or insect, either, and it competes with weeds and grasses exceedingly well.This plant can be grown as a small shrub or as a standard if you wish. It’s deciduous and won’t maintain its leaves in the winter, but it has good form and shape.You don’t need to look at the zone growing chart. Remember, it’s one of our original native plants. It’s well-adapted and produces fantastic growth from Nova Scotia to British Columbia and from Florida to Mexico. It grows well in all of North America.Grows anywhere as a vineThis plant can be grown as a vine, too, on a trellis, trees, houses — anywhere.This amazing plant has wonderful fall color and produces wildlife food (the birds seem to devour its seeds). Besides all these other characteristics, it can be used as a barrier plant where you don’t want traffic in the landscape. Virtually nobody steps into or crosses this plant.There may be no other plant that incorporates all of these ornamental characteristics in a single plant.Would you like to have one?Probably not.It happens to be Toxicodendron radicans (poison ivy).If you still don’t like itIf you already have it in your landscape but don’t really enjoy its virtues, there are ways to get rid of it.Most people who are highly allergic to poison ivy wisely choose not to hand-remove it. Many people resort to herbicides to control the plant. A number of products will provide control, including some that homeowners can buy:last_img read more

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Ulster clash postponed

first_imgUlster’s RaboDirect Pro12 game against the Scarlets in Belfast on Friday night has been postponed. “A further update will be issued as soon as possible.” Ulster announced that referee Leighton Hodges had deemed the Ravenhill pitch unplayable. “The two teams are now exploring the possibility of playing the game tomorrow at Ravenhill,” Ulster said, in a statement. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Magpies won’t sack Pardew over butt

first_img However while the former Reading, West Ham, Charlton and Southampton manager is likely to face further action from the Football Association, the Magpies will not impose further punishment. Pardew’s latest touchline misdemeanour came with his side leading the Tigers 3-1 and well on their way to a 4-1 Barclays Premier League victory. Meyler brushed past him inside his technical area as he chased the ball as it ran out of play, and the Newcastle manager reacted angrily, confronting the player before moving his head towards him. After the ensuing melee had abated, referee Kevin Friend cautioned Meyler and then sent Pardew to the stands, from where he watched the remainder of the game. He made a swift apology in his post-match interviews, one which was accepted by opposite number Steve Bruce, but that did not prevent his club from taking a dim view of his behaviour. LMA boss Bevan was equally unimpressed, and told BBC Radio 5 Live’s Sportsweek programme: “The buck stops with Alan. It’s unacceptable, it’s inappropriate and it’s insupportable from every perspective and Alan knows that. “He immediately realised the serious error, (made) sincere apologies to all parties and obviously (has) deep regret. “It was good to see (Hull boss) Steve Bruce’s reaction and Hull accepting (Pardew’s apology). “But Alan does need to think hard about how not to put himself in that position again.” Pardew said after the match he would have to “to sit down and stay out of the way” in future rather than roam his technical area to avoid getting embroiled in similar incidents. Bevan added: “I was pleased to see Newcastle in a very short period of time making a very swift, professional response that provided Alan with a very heavy fine and a formal warning.” Bevan also said the LMA was reviewing the technical area with a view to moving managers further away from the action. He added: “We did a technical report six or seven months ago, interviewing 40 referees and 40 managers, and we’re looking at the moment how the technical area works in America, for example, in other sports and seeing how we can look to improve several problems that occur because of the positioning.” Bevan admitted the tight confines of some of the old grounds would pose a problem, with the manager also needing to be kept out of the fans. He added: “But what we can do is make a serious effort to look at how the technical area should be placed.” Former FA executive director David Davies said a suspension for the remainder of the season was “conceivable” and described it as “a very serious matter which I suspect will be dealt with very severely”. Newcastle boss Alan Pardew will not face the sack over his headbutt on Hull midfielder David Meyler. Press Association Sport understands that the 52-year-old’s job is safe despite calls for his head following the ugly incident at the KC Stadium on Saturday, which League Managers Association chief executive Richard Bevan branded “unacceptable and inappropriate”. Owner Mike Ashley is understood to be furious with Pardew’s conduct on the touchline and the club announced late on Saturday night that he has been fined £100,000 and been severely reprimanded. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Minnie Bush, 78, Wellington: May 17, 1936 – June 1, 2014

first_imgMinnie BushMinnie Bush, 78, of Wellington passed away Sunday, June 1, 2014 at the Sumner Regional Medical Center in Wellington.Funeral Services will be held at 2 p.m., Thursday, June 5, 2014 at the First Free Will Baptist Church in Wellington. Visitation will be Wednesday, June 4, 2014 from 1 p.m. until 8 p.m. with the family receiving friends from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Shelley Family Funeral Home in Wellington.Burial will be in the Prairie Lawn Cemetery. A memorial has been established with the First Free Will Baptist Church of Wellington and may be left with the Shelley Family Funeral Home. Funeral arrangements are with the Shelley Family Funeral Home of Wellington. For further information please visit www.shelleyfamilyfh.com.Minnie Lee Bush was born the daughter of William and Gertrude (Laney) Kelley on May 17, 1936 in Higdon, Arkansas. Minnie lived in Kellyville, OK, Bushy Head, OK, and Winfield, KS, before moving to Wellington in 1966. She received her GED in 1979. Minnie was a Restorative Therapy Aide at the Good Samaritan Center in Wellington for 35 years retiring in 2001. She enjoyed babysitting her grandchildren and great grandchildren. Her hobbies included quilting and needlepoint.Minnie is survived by her children: Johnnie Phares of Oklahoma City, Ocie Hartman of Cripple Creek, Colo., Tartus Bush of Hennessey, Okla. and Leota Tooman of Wellington, KS; 9 grandchildren, 19 great grandchildren and a brother Bill Kelley.She is preceded in death by her parents, 2 sisters and 2 brothers.last_img read more

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