Rivers of Chocolate to Flow at the Cooking Camp

first_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News Looking for some sweet summer fun for your kids this summer? Well, the Cooking Camp www.summerartacademy.com will be running a week of Cooking Camp simply called â€œChocolate Extravaganza”…“We normally start the week with over 400 pounds of Chocolate and at times I feel the need to look for an Ooompa Loompa to help me because I will feel like Willie Wonka, we will have so much Chocolate flowing during this great week” stated an excited former Pasadena Le Cordon Bleu Graduate and Instructor and now Executive Chef of the Cooking Camp Chris Allen. See PhotoKids will be able to treat their family to some amazing Chocolate delights like a Chocolate Decadence Cake that requires almost 1 pound of chocolate to make, Chocolate Truffle making with classic French Ganache and a great holiday gift basket with great ideas and techniques for children to create next holiday season.The Cooking Camp offers 8 delicious individual weeks of tasty class selections for your Teens and Kids 7-17 years old choose. All classes are weekly Monday – Friday in 3 hour sessions 9-noon or 1:00pm-4:00pm, which makes the Cooking Camp a great solution for some of those idle summer hours that need constructive life skills, in a fun, delicious and safe camp environment.Titles such as Cooking Around the Clock will feature a week of menus highlighting 5 different meal periods; breakfast, brunch, lunch, high tea and dinner. “This is a great class for kids to learn basic skills and recipes that they will use for the rest of their life like scrambled eggs and from scratch Mac n Cheese,” stated Chef Allen.“We also offer a class that goes on a Worldwide culinary journey called the Global Gourmet,” continued Chef Allen. This week’s classes will feature a Tapas workshop, a homemade Raviolis day, Sushi making day and Taco Bar Friday with traditional and fruit salsas all done in a hands on cooking environment.Other great cooking themed weeks are available like, Pizza~Pasta~Palooza which highlights the delicious foods of Italy including a Pizza party on Friday where kids get to create their own masterpiece Pizzas. “Cooking Camp has always taken pride in the fact that when kids learn how to make Pizza at Cooking Camp, they learn the entire process from feeding the yeast, kneading dough and making a proper Pizza sauce. We have never just given a child PopNFresh dough and tomato sauce and called it Pizza,” lamented Chef Allen.Grillin n Chillin is a class that Chef Allen created to pay tribute to one of the first Food Network shows that he began to watch back in 1996 teaching him the difference between gas and charcoal cooking. “That show really influenced me into deciding to enroll at Le Cordon Bleu in 2001 to try to become a Chef,” lamented Allen.Another great week for a young Baker would be Baker’s Delight, which features both sweet and savory baking recipes. Chef Allen said, “We have responded to the requests of many past campers to do an entire week of baking, so I included plenty of my personal favorites like Crème Brulee, Mini Beef Wellingtons and Classic French Tarte Tatin.”The Cooking Camp is now heading into their 9th year serving the greater Pasadena area teaching kids of all ages the hands on tricks of the trade by Le Cordon Bleu trained Chef Instructors. Classes are filling fast, so help support a small local business www.summerartacademy.com then click Cooking camp icon to dive into the delicious world of Cooking Camp!! Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Subscribe Cover Story Rivers of Chocolate to Flow at the Cooking Camp By FIELDING MELISH Published on Tuesday, May 20, 2014 | 3:37 pm 7 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  More Cool Stuff Business News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy center_img Top of the News Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Make a comment Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Your email address will not be published. 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No New COVID-19 Cases Reported Sunday In Chautauqua County

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Photo: Governor Tom Wolf / CC BY 2.0MAYVILLE – The Chautauqua County COVID-19 Response Team says there were no new cases of the novel Coronavirus reported Sunday.Officials say 21 people remain under a mandatory quarantine, 38 in precautionary quarantine and 22 are placed under mandatory isolation because they are symptomatic of the virus and lab test results are pending.So far the county has received 87 negative test results to date.Health officials continue to meet daily and urge residents to stay home. When in public officials ask residents to follow social distancing guidelines. last_img read more

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Dirty Girl

first_imgI did something really strange and out of character for me the other day. I went for a hike. I spend a lot of time in the woods, mostly mountain biking, sometimes running, occasionally backpacking, but rarely am I just hiking. And yet there I was, in the Nantahala Gorge knocking out a brutal piece of the Bartram Trail that climbs roughly 80,000 feet in 2.5 miles. Okay, that’s a bit of an exaggeration. But the trail was steep, weaving in and out of a narrow gulch cut by Ledbetter Creek. Supposedly, there’s good canyoneering on that creek, but I was solo so I stuck to the trail. I get spooked easily when I hike alone—my mind mulling over all of the different ways that I could die alone in the woods.Morbid, I know, but that’s the way my mind works, always visualizing the worst-case scenario. The fact that I saw two snakes on the trail within about 100 yards didn’t put me at ease. Okay, one of them was a baby snake, but the other snake was definitely…well, looking back on it, the other snake was probably just a really long centipede. But I was in a heightened emotional state, so I gave that vicious centipede a wide berth on the trail. Then I started thinking about snake bites, and whether or not I’d have the skills it takes to capture a poisonous snake after it bites me. Then I started thinking about poisonous spiders. And the return of the mountain lion to the Southern Appalachians. And packs of coyotes. And freak lightning storms. And bears. Shit, bears.Other than the bloody internal monologue that accompanied me the entire day, it was a beautiful hike. I took a picture of Bartram Falls, then booked it back down the trail, a thunderstorm chasing me the entire descent.IMG_1202Back in civilization (aka River’s End pub next to the N.O.C.) I comforted myself with the Sherpa Rice, a kitchen sink kind of dish, and a Dirty Girl Blonde from Nantahala Brewing Company. NBC has been around for a while now, operating out of a cool warehouse-like space next to the train tracks in downtown Bryson City. Their distribution must be small though, because I rarely see their beers up in Asheville. But I’m always happy to order a pint when I have the chance.Dirty Girl is a blonde ale that drinks as easy as those canned lagers you grew up with, but tastes way, way better. It’s crisp, but has a buttery kind of mouthfeel and comes in at an almost sessionable 5.75% ABV. In other words, it’s the perfect beer to settle the nerves after getting attacked by a nest of centipedes, er, poisonous snakes.last_img read more

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Worth their weight in gold

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Beginning to feel like home

first_imgWith the onset of warmer weather and the last day of classes just a week away, one can practically hear the final sighs of spring in the air. There’s another sound, though, and it’s virtually inescapable.It’s the pervasive clanking of tent construction.The sea of white tents and stages around campus signals the arrival of the 17th annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, a sprawling, two-day celebration of reading and writing — the nation’s largest event of its kind.Photo courtesy of Michael KovacThis year’s event features almost 300 booths, hosting a variety of exhibitors, from booksellers and publishers to cultural organizations. There’s also a long list of intriguing participating authors, including Lakers legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and acclaimed food writer Jonathan Gold.It’s worth noting that this year’s festival will mark only the second time that USC hosts the event. For 15 years, the festival took place on crosstown rival UCLA’s Westwood campus. The shift to USC’s campus was motivated by numerous factors, including the Los Angeles Times’ desire to make the event more conveniently accesible to all L.A. residents, as well as to foster future growth.“It wasn’t that we were looking to leave UCLA, per se, but rather to move somewhere more centrally located in relation to the rest of the city,” said Maret Orliss, the senior programming manager for the Times.Orliss noted that USC’s status as a private university also had its benefits.“There were possibilities for USC to expand the festival that UCLA could not match — not through any fault of their own,” Orliss said, “but simply due to USC’s being a private university where you can just talk to someone to make a decision, whereas UCLA is a state university and often presents a longer process.”The festival’s budget also raised some strife: Negotiations between the Times and UCLA regarding how to share expenses became an issue of contention, with budget cuts to the UC system making it difficult for the school to support the festival, according to a September 2010 Times report.Ellie Launer, a junior majoring in theater at UCLA, said though it seems many current students didn’t actively participate in the festival when it was held on UCLA’s campus, the move away from the school was still disappointing.“With all of the protests and budget cuts, I feel the festival wasn’t a huge priority [for] the school’s administrators,” Launer said. “It was a really great opportunity, though, and I had a great time. It’s a shame the underclassmen never got to see it here.”Photo courtesy of Michael KovacAs was hoped, the Festival of Books indeed saw growth in its first year at USC, with an unprecedented number of visitors — more than 140,000 — and a huge increase in the number of book drive donations, from 800 to 4,000. This year’s festival presents further expansion still, with more exhibitors and events than ever as well as the establishment of a food truck court on Cromwell Field — a response to visitors’ demands for more dining options in an open setting.Other new features include a greater focus on the School of Cinematic Arts. Orliss noted a screening of the director’s cut of Watchmen that will be preceded by a discussion from representatives of DC Comics on the new Watchmen prequel comic series. Oddly enough, there will also be a live reading of an episode of My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, which does nothing if not demonstrate the festival’s breadth.Both school administrators and the Times have committed to having the festival at USC’s University Park Campus for an indefinite period of time.All these actions require funding, and though neither Orliss nor the university were able to comment on the specifics of the festival’s finances, it’s safe to assume that the festival represents a hefty investment for USC.Austin Vogel, a sophomore majoring in computer science, believes it’s all worth it.“[The Festival of Books] attracts a lot of public attention to the university, which is obviously beneficial, and it also shows our commitment to giving back to the community in the form of a great event,” Vogel said. “It also helps independent vendors and authors to show their work.”Jeremy Slap, a sophomore majoring in philosophy and neuroscience, put it more simply: “It’s festive, and there are a ton of books. It’s a lot of fun.”No one is quite sure what form books and literature will take in the coming years, but this doesn’t seem to faze the festival’s coordinators. John Conroy, a spokesperson for the event, said the festival looks to address the rise of the literary journal, including the Los Angeles Review of Books, and to judiciously adapt to the dynamic development of new media.Perhaps most telling, the Times includes a curious question on its Festival of Books “Attendee FAQ”:“Will the festival still be a celebration of the written word?”The answer?“Yes. Now and always.”last_img read more

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Essien expected to join exodus

first_imgMichael Essien looks set to be the latest player to move in Chelsea’s extensive summer makeover, with the Ghanaian midfielder attracting serious interest from Fenerbahce.Fenerbahce are understood to be awaiting the outcome of their Champions League play-off with Spartak Moscow on Wednesday night, given how qualification would greatly strengthen their hand in any transfer negotiations. As it stands, they are 2-1 down from the first leg in Moscow but have the benefit of an away goal.Earlier this summer, Essien himself was quoted as saying he wants to remain at Chelsea.“My intention is to stay and I’m looking forward to a new season. I still have two more years here. I’m still here, I’m still around,” Essien said. “Yes, the team is changing and there have been players going, new players coming in but that’s how professional football is. You just have to deal with the situation and go out and perform for the team.“I will play anywhere I am asked to play and it’s always been that way with me. I work hard for the team, for Chelsea. I’ve played right-back and other positions and it’s no problem.”That situation is complicated, however, by the fact that Essien hasn’t played a single minute so far this season, with manager Roberto Di Matteo even going so far as to strengthen the very position Essien mentioned, by signing Cesar Azpilicueta from Marseille. If anything, the manner in which the once-dominant midfielder has so drastically fallen out of favour illustrates the effect injuries have had on his career. A series of long-term absences appear to have sapped Essien of the dynamism that once characterised his game. Indeed, given how Chelsea are still working on the manner in which old defence is linked to new attack, it is difficult not to think that the Essien of 2005 to 2008 would have been perfect.Essien, however, was philosophical on his injuries during the summer.“The injuries I have had are just part of the game and when they happen you just have to get yourself back. I’ve not set myself any targets. I just pray to be injury-free. I’m very calm. I don’t talk much but put me on the pitch and I will do my best.”last_img read more

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