Childs surpasses 1,000 points; BYU beats Oral Roberts 85-65

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPROVO, Utah (AP) — Yoeli Childs scored 24 points and grabbed 14 rebounds to lead BYU to an 85-65 victory over Oral Roberts on Thursday night.Childs entered the game needing 16 points to reach 1,000 for his career. He became the 51st player in program history — and the 15th under BYU coach Dave Rose — to reach the milestone. Childs hit a 3-pointer with 11:15 to play to surpass 1,000.Jahshire Hardnett added 16 points on 6-of-11 shooting, one point shy of a career-best, for BYU (3-1). Freshman Connor Harding added 10 points off the bench.Kaelen Malone and Kevin Obanor scored 12 points apiece to lead Oral Roberts (1-4).The Cougars closed the first half on a 20-8 run to build a 43-31 halftime lead. Harding sparked the surge with a 3-pointer and had eight points. BYU opened the second half with an 11-4 spurt and cruised from there. November 15, 2018 /Sports News – Local Childs surpasses 1,000 points; BYU beats Oral Roberts 85-65 Tags: BYU Cougars Basketball/Yoeli Childs Associated Presslast_img read more

Continue reading

Phish Redeems Forgettable First Set With Stellar “Everything’s Right” > “Down With Disease” In Austin

first_imgFollowing a first frame that offered little to write home about, the burning question that loomed over the setbreak chatter asked if this show was bound for mediocrity, or if it would be A Tale of Two Sets, with the second half coming in strong to relieve a forgettable set one. When Phish returned from the intermission and launched into new-ish tune “Everything’s Right”, the question still lingered. But as the band drove the song deeper and deeper, all doubts quickly dissipated.Over the course of the jam’s nearly 20 minutes, the band explored a number of major-key spaces, briefly hinting at a segue into “What’s The Use?” before continuing to forge ahead, blazing to a peak and, finally, dropping somewhat awkwardly back into the song’s final refrain. This rendition of “Everything’s Right” marked Phish’s 7th rendition of the tune since its pre-Dozen debut last year, and easily eclipsed the previous 6 as the deepest and most interesting version to date.“Down With Disease” was up next, marking its third outing of the summer. It may be worth noting that every “Disease” this summer has now appeared on the setlist alongside “Everything’s Right”, and vice versa (Tahoe 2, L.A. 1)—not that it holds any particular significance, but Phish kids do love looking for trends. Most shows spell something, after all. Clocking in at just over 17 minutes in length, this “Disease” stacked up admirably against this summer’s prior two run-throughs. Gordon handled the heavy lifting as the band jettisoned into Type II space. Around the 8-minute mark, the jam settled into an ambient quiver, Mike laying the foundation while Trey painted in the lines with frugal guitar ornaments. The jam got darker from there as Fish showed off his technical prowess behind the kit, bolstering the Baker’s Dozen-style cocktail lounge groove with a relentless, complex backbeat while the band settled in around him.After several more minutes of eerie ambience, the jam faded out around Fishman’s cymbal-heavy drum pattern, giving way to the pulsing bounce of “Steam”. The song built rapidly with some Haunted House scream samples, Trey wailing away with abandon. Before long, the jam disappeared as steam, giving way to “Seven Below”, another tune not played since the Baker’s Dozen’s coconut-flavored opening night. On this hot Texas night, “Seven Below” turned the heat up even higher, pushing through major-key space to an anthemic climax before petering out into “Dirt”. This “Dirt” came just four shows after its 2018 debut on night one at the Bill Graham, marking the shortest gap between “Dirts” in 15 years.Another recently played tune, “The Wedge”, came in next after a 3 show gap, marking its third performance of the summer. After a quick bob along the surface, the second “Wilson” of the summer provided the set with a fourth-quarter espresso shot. The band maintained that energy for an always-welcome “Run Like An Antelope” set closer, before rounding out the show with a sing-along “Loving Cup” encore.Phish summer tour continues this weekend as the band heads to Alpharetta, GA for their sold-out three-night run at Verizon Amphitheatre. For a full list of Phish’s upcoming tour dates, head to their website.Setlist: Phish | Austin360 Amphitheatre | Del Valle, TX | 7/31/18Set 1: Sample in a Jar, Light, The Moma Dance, Funky Bitch, Heavy Things, Theme From the Bottom, Brian and Robert, Halfway to the Moon, The Line, I Didn’t Know, 46 DaysSet 2: Everything’s Right > Down with Disease[1] > Steam > Seven Below > Dirt > The Wedge, Wilson > Run Like an AntelopeEncore: Loving CupA full soundboard recording of the show is available to stream now via LivePhish. On Tuesday night, Phish tour rolled into Texas for a one-off performance at Austin360 Amphitheatre, the 10th show on their ongoing 2018 summer tour.After the tour’s ”front nine” produced notably strong first frames across the board, Austin’s first set played much more like, well, a first set. “Sample In A Jar” got the evening started—as it so often does—making its first live appearance since it opened the now-storied “Jam-Filled” show at last summer’s Baker’s Dozen. This 26-show gap marked the longest stretch of shows without a “Sample” since the song’s debut in 1993, setting a trend that would continue throughout the night. “Light” got a somewhat surprising nod in the two-spot, the go-to 3.0 jam vehicle appearing in the first set for the first time since Mexico 2016. After a brief flirtation with some Type I improv, the band opted for “The Moma Dance”, their third version of the summer. While this version failed to reach the heights of the set one “Moma” from the tour opener in Tahoe (or, for that matter, the rendition that kicked off a top-notch set two at BGCA night 1), it did provide a fun, funky interlude paired with the short but searing “Funky Bitch” that followed.Following “Funky Bitch”, guitarist Trey Anastasio, who himself was born Texas, took a moment to address his fellow Texas natives in the audience. “Thanks, everybody. We’re so happy to be in Texas,” he mused. “I gotta ask one question before we go on here. I know a lot of people move to Austin from different parts of the country. I’m just curious: How many, um, real Texans—meaning you were born in Texas—are in the audience? Put your hands up! Thank you. Real Texans. 1964. Fort Worth Children’s Hospital. Texas…in the house.”After a long pause, the band opted for “Heavy Things”, Page McConnell highlighting this mostly straightforward reading on the piano. From there, “Theme From The Bottom” bubbled up to the surface, offering some well-wrangled instrumental conversation between Page and Trey as the song patiently built to its a cappella bridge. The set continued relatively unremarkably with a trio of tunes not played since the Baker’s Dozen, “Brian and Robert”, “Halfway to the Moon”, and everyone’s favorite Fuego pariah, “The Line”. Like the “Sample” that opened the set, this “Line” ended the longest gap the song has seen since its debut (23 shows), a year and two days after its last showing on Cinnamon night.Yet another “not seen since the Dozen” tune came next in “I Didn’t Know”, giving Jon Fishman (and “Moses Heaps, Moses Brown, and Moses DeWitt”) an opening for his (their?) first vacuum solo of the summer. As the Electrolux sucked Fish’s face, Mike Gordon amusingly executed an onstage wardrobe change, losing his shoes and, subsequently, his pants (don’t worry, he had shorts on underneath) before re-tying his shoes and making it back to the mic in time for his vocal cue. Finally, “46 Days” brought the set to a close, the coals smoldering behind dextrous guitar work from Trey but never quite igniting in earnest.last_img read more

Continue reading

Barbados snatch two key wickets to hold the edge

first_imgBASSETERRE, St Kitts (CMC) – Barbados snatched two key wickets to hold the edge against Guyana heading into today’s final day of their second round match in the Regional Under-19 Championship at Verchilds.The Barbadians extended their overnight 140 for five to 207 all out to secure a first-innings lead of 65 runs before striking twice as Guyana ended the second day on 75 for two – a lead of just 10 runs.Kevlon Anderson, batting at number three, was resisting with an unbeaten 30 while opener Raymond Perez made 29.The pair came together after Aley Algoo fell cheaply for five with 12 on the board, putting on a crucial 47 for the second wicket.Anderson has so far faced 99 balls and struck a single boundary while Perez counted four boundaries in his 69-ball innings.Earlier, Kilano Brathwaite completed a responsible 57 but Barbados lost their last five wickets for 67 runs to squander some of their advantage.Resuming the day on 24, Brathwaite faced 121 deliveries in 139 minutes and counted seven boundaries, before he was ninth out.He put on an important 34 for the seventh wicket with Raneil Smith who made nine.Off-spinner Kevin Sinclair was the best bowler with five for 57.last_img read more

Continue reading

Nothing good can come from weekend

first_imgWhen I’m dealing with a tough situation, I’ve learned to take a simple approach in order to decide what to do.First, I think of the worst-case scenario and imagine that. Second, I think of the best-case scenario and imagine that.Then I decide what to do.Intuitive, I know.Why am I telling you this?Well, I tried to use my usual approach when deciding what to think about USC’s appearance before the NCAA Committee on Infractions this weekend in Tempe, Ariz.The worst-case scenario, I reckoned, is some combination of sanctions that force the football team to vacate the wins from past years, lose scholarships and a ban from postseason play for the next few seasons.Yeah, it doesn’t look too great when you add it all up.I ran into some trouble, though, when trying to decipher what the best case would be.Really now, what’s a reasonable best-case scenario for the hearings?We won’t officially know anything for at least six weeks, but let’s recap the situation briefly before we decide our mindset between now and April.A combined eight coaches and higher-ups from USC spent three full days — something close to 36 actual hours — in a hearing, discussing alleged violations and a lack of ever-important institutional control over the last five or so years.David Price, the NCAA vice president for enforcement services, told the New York Times it was the longest hearing he had ever been a part of.Hmm. He’s worked for the infractions committee for 11 years now. And, mind you, these hearings usually involve more than one team over the course of a day — not one school’s two biggest programs over an entire weekend.Think there might be something going on?Current running backs coach Todd McNair brought his attorney along for the ride for the first two days of the hearing. Former men’s basketball coach Tim Floyd brought one of his on Saturday.Why the legal counsel?Firstly, McNair was former USC running back Reggie Bush’s position coach at the time when Bush  is believed to have received as much as $300,000 worth of cash and goods from potential marketing agencies.Multiple sources have reported that McNair knew of Bush’s associations with a business called New Era Sports & Entertainment during his college career. New Era — allegedly the brainchild of Bush’s stepfather, LaMar Griffin, but funded entirely by other financiers — paid for Bush’s accommodations during multiple hotel stays and provided other items to him and his family, Yahoo! Sports first reported in 2006.And therein lies the rub, because two New Era financiers — the ridiculously named Michael Michaels and Bush’s friend Lloyd Lake — are believed to have visited the USC locker room twice after games in the 2005 season.Reports say that alone is grounds for a lack of institutional control ruling.And I haven’t even gotten to Floyd yet.The now-New Orleans Hornets assistant coach flew in to Tempe this weekend to plead his case to the NCAA committee. Floyd resigned last summer amid allegations that he paid at least $1,000 in cash to a runner for a potential agent of former USC guard O.J. Mayo and knew of money that changed hands between Mayo and the now-infamous Rodney Guillory.Confusing, isn’t it?But despite admitted wrongdoing and self-imposed sanctions on the basketball program last month, reports have the issue as another possible example of a lack of institutional control.Meanwhile, Floyd’s time at USC is done. But he came to Arizona, his lawyer said, to clear his name.How exactly did he and his attorney try to do that?Your guess is as good as mine. As for that whole best-case scenario thing, well, you can go ahead and guess that, too.And now you see why my approach failed.“Looking Past the X’s and O’s” runs Mondays. To comment on this article, visit dailytrojan.com or e-mail Pedro at [email protected]last_img read more

Continue reading

Ask the Mayor — February 20, 2019 — Mason City mayor Bill Schickel

first_imgMason City’s mayor Bill Schickel was the guest on “Ask the Mayor” on February 20, 2019. Listen back to the program belowlast_img

Continue reading