Puck drop for 2019 Coy Cup is tomorrow

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – It is now one day away until puck drop for the 2019 Coy Cup.Game one for the Fort St. John Flyers takes place tomorrow night, Tuesday, at 8:00 p.m. as they take on the Prince Rupert Rampage.The final deadline to purchase tickets in advance is at 11:59 p.m. MST tonight, Monday, at energetictickets.ca.- Advertisement -Following this deadline, tickets will be available at the North Peace Arena three hours before puck drop of each game starting on March 26 at noon.It is also to note that the Flyers are holding a Coy Cup Raffle in an effort to raise funds as they host the Coy Cup with prizes worth over $4,000.The 2019 Coy Cup takes place March 26 to the 30 at the North Peace Arena.Advertisement Here is the full 2019 Coy Cup schedule:Official 2019 Coy Cup Schedule. Source FSJ Flyerslast_img read more

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Mercedes Benz SA scores for quality

first_img22 June 2010 First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service. The plant was ranked highest among South African automotive plants in initial quality in the 2007 and 2008 South Africa IQS studies. In 2009, the plant was awarded the IQS gold quality award for manufacturing vehicles which had the fewest defects and malfunctions of any plant in Europe and Africa that serves the US market. S-Class in the Large Premium Car category “To receive such an award despite the relentless pressure and stresses of the global recession over the past two years, points to the brilliant quality of our people and processes,” said MBSA president and CEO Hansgeorg Niefer. The South African division of global vehicle manufacturer Mercedes-Benz has won a platinum award for producing vehicles with the fewest defects and malfunctions of any plant in the world supplying the US market. MediaClubSouthAfrica The study was conducted between February and May 2010. Based on responses from 82 000 US users of the 2010 model-year vehicles surveyed after 90 days of use, MBSA’s East London plant had only 28 defects per 100 vehicles, putting it at the top of all global plants serving the US market. The IQS study looked at problems experienced by owners and lessees of the C-Class in two categories: design-related problems, and defects and malfunctions. Plants are rewarded based on their limited defects and malfunction. GL-Class in the Large Premium Crossover/SUV category. E-Class Coupe in the Compact Premium Sporty Car category The East London plant has also come out tops in the JD Power and Associates South Africa IQS, based on responses from South African users. “Daimler’s East London plant has been a top performing plant and its achievement in 2010 is particularly impressive,” said Brian Walters, vice-president of Europe, Middle East and Africa operations at JD Power and Associates. MBSA is a wholly owned subsidiary of Germany’s Daimler AG. The C-Class was also rated highest in the Entry Premium Car segment, with the A-Class also managing a repeat award ranking top of the upper small car segment in quality. This is the second consecutive year in which Mercedes-Benz South Africa’s (MBSA) plant in the Eastern Cape, which produces the C-Class Mercedes model for the local and US market, has been given a quality award by the JD Power and Associates US Initial Quality Study (IQS). Free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service. Best in South Africa Four other Mercedes models have won second place in the JD Power and Associates 2010 US IQS study. They are: E-Class in the Midsize Premium Car category “Daimler’s rigorous quality management processes are a key reason for why the brand has been able to assemble consistently high-quality vehicles in different regions of the world.”last_img read more

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Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast — May 31, 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Ryan Martin, Ohio Ag Net Chief MeteorologistNo change in our short term forecast this morning, as we have rain over most of Ohio for the next two days yet. As expected, the heaviest rains were farther west over Indiana yesterday, where the center of old Alberto’s circulation tracked through. Still, western Ohio had some good moisture develop in the late afternoon and evening, with scattered action across other parts of the state. Today, additional rains should fall, bringing up to a quarter of an inch. The rains look to be more frequent along and south of I-70, but we won’t rule them out farther north. Another round of moisture lifts into Ohio tomorrow and actually looks to be more impressive than today’s action. We can add another .25-.5” over 70% of the state. The map at right shows a snapshot of rain around midday on Friday. Action winds down by later Friday evening in most areas, but we would not be surprised to see some lingering clouds over far eastern Ohio even still Saturday morning.We still have Saturday as a sunny day over Ohio. However, we do have to make some fairly major changes to our outlook for Sunday. Our approaching trough has strengthened considerably and looks to bring some significant rain chances for Sunday midday and afternoon. This front looks to be peaking right as it moves through Ohio and can have some strong to severe thunderstorm potential with it. AS such, we are raising our rain totals for Sunday midday through Sunday night to .25”-1” with coverage at 80% of Ohio. The best chance of thunderstorms and severe weather, along with the upper end of the rain range, will be in northeast Ohio.Even with bigger threats of rain on Sunday, we still look for a nice, dry start to the week next week. We are dry for, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. Temps will be normal to above normal and we should see good sunshine, drying and field work conditions. The potential for moisture from a front later next week is not as high this morning. The front will be there but will likely have little to no moisture to work with, so at this point, we are pulling back on precipitation for Thursday and Friday but think we could see some rain next Saturday.No change for the 11-16 day extended period. Our next front likely hits toward the early to middle part of the extended window, around the 10th (late) through Monday the 11th. Rain totals are not over the top, but we can see .25”-.6” over about 70% of the state. Then we go back to strong high pressure dominating to finish the period for the 12th and 13th.last_img read more

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Three Easy and Essential Advanced Framing Techniques

first_imgThe only reason they’re not already used on every stick-built house is inertia. “We’ve been doing it this way for 30 years and it’s never been a problem.” If you’re a builder and worried about trying something new, check out Matt Risinger’s video about standard framing versus advanced framing.The exterior walls in a typical house are 25% framing. Wood has an R-value of about 1 per inch. Most insulation is close to 4 per inch. Using these advanced framing techniques will reduce the amount of wood in those walls and increase the insulation.It’s time to get over the inertia. These things are easy, easy, easy. Your house won’t fall down. Instead, your house will be better. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, building science consultant, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. Most new homes in North America are built with sticks. The early home builders used bigger pieces of wood — timbers — and when the smaller dimensional lumber that we use so much today hit the market, they scoffed at those new-fangled little woody things, calling them sticks. Now our home construction industry is full of people who do stick building and the home you live is most likely stick-built. And sadly, many of the techniques used to build many of those homes are the same used before we started insulating them.Before insulation became widespread, it didn’t matter if you put extra wood in your walls. In fact, many builders still think more wood is better. But when your insulation goes into the cavities between framing members, every extra bit of wood means less insulation. That means more heat loss in winter and more heat gain in summer because wood has an R-value less than a third that of most insulation. (Putting all the insulation on the outside is better, but that’s more expensive and not likely to happen on a wide scale in the residential market.)The good news is there are some simple ways to improve the framing and get more insulation without compromising the structural stability of the home. Here are three I think ought to be used on every stick-built home.Ladder T-wallsThis one is a no-brainer. When an interior wall intersects an exterior wall, the standard practice is to use three studs to complete the T-wall. The photo above shows what that looks like.[Image credit: U.S. Department of Energy]The oriented strand board (OSB) sheathing you see in the photo above will get covered with insulation. The space between those two studs in the exterior wall, however, won’t get any insulation. There’s no way to get it there. (Well, you could drill holes and try to spray foam in there, but spraying foam in a closed cavity risks blowing out the wall or leaving voids. Plus, few builders would take the time to do that.)One easy solution is the ladder T-wall. The diagram at right shows what it looks like.Rather than vertical studs, you take some of your scrap wood and run it across horizontally. You put the wide side against the T-wall stud so you have space in the back to insulate that cavity. It’s beautiful! You save wood and get a better-insulated house, too.The photo above is from the North Central Georgia affiliate of Habitat for Humanity. We work with them and are always impressed with their ability to implement stuff like this.Here’s what it looks like in real life (right).It’s got 1-by deadwood for drywall and what is essentially fireblocking through the cavity.Of course, there are variations of advanced framing at T-walls. Here’s one that a client of ours used a few years ago (right). RELATED ARTICLESThe Pros and Cons of Advanced FramingGBA Encyclopedia: Efficient Framing Fine Homebuilding: ”The Future of Framing Is Here” by Joseph Lstiburek The advanced framing alternative is to use three studs but leaves an opening to get insulation back into the corner, like this (right).It’s usually called a California corner here in the Southeast. I’m not sure what it’s called in California. Maybe just a corner? That DOE fact sheet I mentioned above also shows how to do a two-stud corner. Here’s the diagram (right).It uses less wood and gives you even more space for insulation. Check out the fact sheet for more details on that.center_img The natural solution here is to throw some insulation in the gap. You can do it easily with rigid foam board. If you don’t like foam, you can use mineral wool or something else. Just get some insulation in there. Otherwise, you’ve got a thermal bridge that wastes your heating and cooling dollars and could create other problems, like making your mean radiant temperature uncomfortably cold in winter or hot in summer.The image at right (from the same U.S. Dept. of Energy document on advanced framing as the ladder T-wall image) illustrates how it works.Going a step further, you can get more reduction of thermal bridging at headers by sizing them properly or not using them at all. A lot of framers will use the same size header in every opening of the house. But different openings have different loads to transmit. And some have no load. In those cases, you can make the header smaller or eliminate it, leaving room for even more insulation.Too easy not to useThese three advanced framing techniques for walls in stick-built homes are too easy not to use. In fact, some people will look at these and dispute their being called “advanced framing” at all. But in the Southeastern U.S. and some other regions, plenty of builders still haven’t adopted these three techniques. California corners and two-stud cornersThis is similar to the T-wall problem. The standard practice uses three studs and blocks off the corner so you can’t insulate it. Here’s what it looks like (right). Insulated headersHeaders abound in stick-built homes. They carry the load when you can’t put in studs at the regular spacing, as is the case where you have doors and windows. They’re often made with two pieces of bigger wood, like 2x10s, but they have a gap. In a 2×4 wall, two 2x10s on edge are 3″ thick. The wall is 3.5″ thick. In a typical home, that extra half inch is wasted. In a 2×6 wall, you’re wasting 2.5”.last_img read more

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