Leon Bridges Gives The National Anthem Some Soul In This New Musical Interpretation [Watch]

first_imgLeon Bridges shows his stars and stripes in this performance for a new series on the National Anthem from ESPN and The Undefeated. The Texas soul sensation reinvents “The Star-Spangled Banner” by turning the song into 6/8th time and delivering an emotionally moving rendition.“I felt that the original version is a little bit too straightforward musically,” Bridges told ESPN in an interview. “I felt it was kind of dope to give a little 6/8, groovy feel to it. Something that felt comfortable for me to sing. I felt that the National Anthem needed a little bit of soul.”Check out Leon Bridge’s beautiful recreation below:last_img read more

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Don’t let coronavirus deliver a knockout blow to your strategic plan

first_imgBoxing legend Mike Tyson once famously said “Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.” Sound familiar for your community bank or credit union strategic plan?For most credit unions and community banks, this thought is extremely poignant when thinking about your strategic plan as it existed pre-coronavirus. More than likely, you had what you thought was a functional strategic plan that was serving your goals at some level until earlier this year when it took a vicious right uppercut from the coronavirus.So, there lies your community bank or credit union strategic plan, flat on the mat with the ref working into his ten-count. What are you going to do?Think like another great boxer (albeit from the world of fiction). Rocky Balboa remarked “… it ain’t about how hard you hit. It’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward; how much you can take and keep moving forward. That’s how winning is done!” 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

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Allianz Life Indonesia books strong premium growth in Q1

first_imgThroughout 2019, the company recorded a net premium income of Rp 12.47 trillion, a 49 percent year-on-year increase.“Allianz Life Indonesia had a tremendous year in 2019. It continues to outperform the market, supported by our multi-distribution channels,” said Joos.Allianz Life Indonesia chief financial officer Cui Cui reported that, throughout last year, the company saw a 33 percent yoy growth via its agency distribution channel, while sales through the bancassurance channel grew by 20.2 percent. That growth continued throughout this year’s first quarter, as the company booked 26 percent and 55 percent yoy growth in its agency and bancassurance channels, respectively.Read also: COVID-19 exposes flaws in Indonesia’s health insurance program“In terms of investment, we are always very prudent. We have a strong risk management culture,” Cui said during the press conference. The company’s total investment funds, known as assets under management (AUM), amounted to Rp 34.23 trillion in 2019, an 8 percent increase from Rp 31.73 trillion in 2018. Meanwhile, this year, its AUM fell by 8 percent to Rp 27.21 trillion from Rp 29.67 trillion in last year’s first quarter. Its total assets recorded a similar trend. In 2019, they grew by 9 percent to Rp 38.35 trillion from Rp 35.27 trillion. However, during this year’s first quarter, the asset value declined by 5 percent to Rp 32.25 trillion from Rp 33.88 trillion in the equivalent period of last year. The insurance claims and benefit payouts rose by 14 percent to Rp 7.84 trillion in 2019 from Rp 6.86 trillion in 2018. This year, they climbed by 4 percent to Rp 702.12 billion by the end of the first quarter, up from Rp 675.98 billion in 2019’s first quarter. Allianz Life Indonesia still managed to show ample creditworthiness based on its solvency ratio, a metric used to measure a company’s ability to pay its debt obligations. By the end of 2019, it stood at 340 percent. Meanwhile, by the end of 2020’s first quarter, it was at 327.63 percent, well above the mandatory minimum of 120 percent. Read also: Prudential led Indonesian market in 2019 with premium income of Rp 25 trillionThe company’s chief marketing officer, Karin Zulkarnaen, explained during the webinar that the Alliancz tried to maintain communication with its customers as part of its business strategy during the pandemic, including through online channels. Throughout 2019, 92 percent of policies were submitted electronically, while 15 to 20 percent of issuance policies were delivered within five minutes, down from policy issuance of seven to nine days prior. Aside from that, the share of e-policies had reached 46 percent. Today, customers were able to submit claims digitally. Karin added that, insurance and benefits expenses related to COVID-19 amounted to Rp 900 billion in the first three months of the year from total claims and benefit expenses of Rp 2.06 trillion.Topics : In the first quarter of this year, Allianz Life Indonesia’s net premium income amounted to Rp 3.37 trillion, a 42 percent jump from Rp 2.36 trillion during the same period last year. Net profit reached Rp 449.4 billion in the January-March period this year, a 98 percent surge from the same period last year.“Allianz sees there will be a shift to more health products and protection,” Joos said during the company’s livestreamed press conference on Tuesday. “Ultimately, in the medium to longer term, the need for protection will only increase because of this pandemic.”[RA::Allianz Indonesia expands digital services as more people stay home::https://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2020/06/11/allianz-indonesia-expands-digital-services-as-more-people-stay-home.html]Joos noted that the growth of the company was fueled by its two main distribution channels: agency and bancassurance. Allianz Life Indonesia partners with Maybank in delivering life and health insurance products to consumers. Insurance provider Allianz Life Indonesia sees growth potential this year after its net premium income was up 42 percent year-on-year in this year’s first quarter as people shift to health products and protection.Allianz Life Indonesia country manager and president director Joos Louwerier said the company saw potential for growth this year as Indonesia still had low insurance penetration.This was despite the fact that the impact of COVID-19 on the company’s business would be prominent in this year’s second quarter, he added, as Indonesia implemented large-scale social restrictions (PSBB). The PSBB had limited people’s mobility and disrupted business operations.last_img read more

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Sunday a reminder of Carroll’s greatness

first_imgEuno Lee is a senior majoring in English literature. He is also the managing editor of the Daily Trojan. His column, “Euno What Time it is,” runs Wednesdays. The Super Bowl is finally over: The media circus has subsided, the game has been played, snacks were devoured, Tim Tebow got a contract to talk about how he didn’t need a contract and, oh yeah, the Seahawks won. They didn’t just win: They made the game boring. At halftime it was 22-0 with an unbearable number of close-ups of Peyton Manning looking more uncomfortable than John Boehner during the State of the Union Address.The mastermind behind the victory, of course, was none other than former USC head coach Pete Carroll. So when time expired, as a USC football fan above all things, I was a bit conflicted. Do I cheer? Am I happy for Pete Carroll?To rub salt on my imaginary wound, in his post-Super Bowl press conference, Carroll likened the Seahawk’s 43-8 victory to the Trojans’ 55-19 swamping of the Oklahoma Sooners in the 2005 BCS National Championship game. It’s a strange sentiment coming from someone who, most Trojans believe, hightailed it out of Los Angeles in the face of NCAA sanctions.The argument against Carroll is this: He left at an inopportune time. He didn’t embrace the Trojan spirit — he didn’t “Fight On.” As the saying goes, when the going got tough, Pete got going. It seemed that he left almost as quickly as he enamored himself to the USC faithful.On the morning of National Signing Day, the impact of the sanctions from the Carroll era linger: The Trojans are in the last year of their scholarship reduction, and will once again roll out a thinner roster than their competitors. The finger-pointing involving NCAA sanctions could last forever, but here’s why we can’t blame Carroll: The coach of the Super Bowl-winning Seattle Seahawks was, more or less, the same coach who recruited players at the college level for USC.But really, Pete Carroll did fight on — if you only consider his NFL career. He faltered in his first try at the helm of the New York Jets (6-10) and had a pair of playoff appearances but fell short of massive expectations in New England (27-21) before he was fired. In April of 2009, NFL Films named him one of the top 10 “Coaches Who Belonged in College” when weighing his NFL failures against his success at USC.With last Sunday’s Super Bowl win, Carroll went from a coach who “belonged in college” to the hottest coach in American sports.The Seahawks’ coach knows how to generate excitement — whether it’s bringing in Will Ferrell and Snoop Dogg on the sidelines at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, or Macklemore and Ryan Lewis to the Seahawk locker room. Above all things, Carroll is the consummate optimist. In an interview with former 49ers quarterback and ESPN analyst Steve Young, Carroll revealed his coaching philosophy that was developed in his years at USC.“Really what we did at ’SC, we tried to take care of the whole person and love these guys up and figure out what they could possibly become and then help them get there,” Carroll said. “You’ve got to create a vision for that kid. You’ve got to get them to buy in and then you coach them with that thought in mind. You do that with every person in the program. You treat everybody with great respect in that regard … You don’t have to worry about the games. That’s not even part of our thinking. We’re just trying to do the best we can do, knowing when we do that, we’re really hard to beat.”It’s impossible to hate Carroll as a person, and it’s tough to speak ill of his character when it’s amply evident that his positive attitude has led him to coaching success. Something about the culture in Carroll’s programs gives players a sense of calm in times of high duress, especially considering the Seahawks’ seemingly calculated dismantling of the Broncos in the Super Bowl.The argument for the Trojans supporting Carroll’s newfound professional football success is this: He was a Trojan once. He brought a culture of positivity to the Trojan locker room, a sense of brotherhood in the football program that echoed with Ed Orgeron’s “One Team, One Heartbeat” mantra last season. And as the saying goes: Once a Trojan, always a Trojan. Pete Carroll is a Trojan, in every sense of the word. It’s time we give him credit for representing USC.last_img read more

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