The Motet Channels The Power Of Interstellar Funk On New Album, ‘Totem’ [Stream/Review]

first_imgThe future space funk is in good hands if Totem, the new album by The Motet, is any indication. The band has made some personnel changes of late, and fans have been waiting eagerly to hear what The Motet had in store for them. Noted proponents of funk with world and dance elements liberally mixed together, The Motet has built a loyal following that was hopeful their heroes would keep it real and keep it real funky. With guitarist Eric Krasno of Lettuce and Soulive producing and writing a pair of tunes for the disc, certain expectations were held, and happily exceeded. The most prominent change came at vocalist, going from Jans Ingber to Lyle Divinsky, a move that has the band sounding even more like a forgotten fountain of the funk hey-day of the late seventies than ever.Stream the album via Spotify below, and follow along with our written review of the new release!Founder Dave Watts fittingly kicks off this new era of The Motet with a twisty percussion intro to “The Truth” that sets the stage to let Divinsky show what he brings to the proceedings. Divinsky’s weapon of choice is a voice that sounds so authentic and perfect for the mood, you almost have to wonder if he was made in a laboratory. The space boogie flows on with the bouncy “Fool No More,” with a snappy bass line from Garrett Sayers that sounds an inexorable call to the dance floor for party people. Organist Joey Porter gets a chance to shine on “Know It Too Well,” as the music opens up and he has a chance to lend squeals and peals to lyric heavy sections before drenching the proceedings with lush chords. The percolating pulse of “Rippin’ Herb” shows how tight The Motet can be, as they play an intricate musical game of “follow the leader” through a winding funk maze, passing off the lead almost imperceptibly. Divinsky shows great comfort for such a short stint in the organization, as his leads on “Damn!” show. Showy use of echo laden vocals and doubling techniques that thicken his already impressive tone to a smooth pervasive presence that make the instrumental breaks a trip to an alternate dimension, sonically, within each original tune’s framework. Nothing has changed about The Motet’s love of instrumentals, and the wordless “Solar Plexus” keeps the overall cosmic groove feeling of Totem going with a touch of reggae thrown in for good measure in the forms of the majestic horn fills. Guitarist Ryan Jalbert continues to show impressive growth in his playing, with his ability to shift from slinky rhythm to full on rock star wail in an instant. The horn section of Gabe Mervine and Drew Sayers use their brass to take every song higher, adding layers of depth and reinforcing the beats and melodies with equal dexterity. Whether hanging back in a thick groove on tunes like “Danger” or getting jazz-y and expressive on songs like “Cloak And Dagger,” The Motet sounds like a finely tuned machine, ready to run perfectly in whatever gear is needed to get where they want to go.For the closing song, the instrumental “Contraband,” the choice is made to slowly take the foot off the accelerator, and to give listeners a cool down as they are slowly dispelled from the Utopian funk spell. Any worries about the future of The Motet should be instantly dispelled from the first notes of Totem. With the release of this united work and tour dates on the horizon to hone the new lineup into a true unit, it certainly looks like the best is yet to come from The Motet. But for now, Totem is a showcase for a funk band that is at the top of their game.last_img read more

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Tales of Transformations: New Belgium Races to Win

first_imgWhat do you think about when you see a huge wooden keg full of tasty craft beer? A nice evening on the porch with friends? Well, Travis Morrison, IT Director, and Erin Williams, Sr. Systems Engineer, from New Belgium Brewery, see access and data points, laden with sensors, providing them what they need to know to keep their production line running smoothly.As the 4th largest craft brewer in the US, New Belgium relies on technology as a crucial component of operations. To transform their IT infrastructure, they partnered with Dell EMC and VMware to adopt a hyperconverged solution.Learn how Travis and Erin are enabling New Belgium’s employees to use data to make better business decisions (and even tastier beer). Here is their Tale of Transformation:While machines are crunching the numbers, people get to taste new craft beers, and New Belgium serves happy customers. It’s a win-win-win situation for all.Are you ready to transform your IT? Then learn how Dell Technologies can help you here.last_img read more

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‘Das the way to go, girl!’: Amul’s latest topical celebrates Hima Das winning four golds in 15 days

first_img WE RECOMMEND 1 year ago North Korea wins the second edition of the Intercontinental Cup It all started for the young athlete at the Poznan Athletics Grand Prix in Poland on July 2 which was also her first competitive 200m race of the year as she clocked 23.65 seconds to clinch her first gold. Das then won her second gold at the same venue at the Kutno Athletics Meet in the 200m category on July 7 at 23.97 seconds. She then registered her third 200m gold at the Kladno Athletics Meet,  Czech Republic as she clocked 23.43 seconds. Her fourth came after winning the 200m race Tabor Athletics Meet in the Czech Republic where she clocked 23.25 seconds 1 year ago WATCH: Zlatan Ibrahimovic scores a perfect hat trick, leaves netizens stunned SUBSCRIBE TO US COMMENT Das is an Arjuna Award winner and the first Indian athlete to win gold at the IAAF U20 World Championships. Seeing Amul celebrate Hima Das’ achievement, the netizens were delighted and the post garnered appreciation.  Written By Last Updated: 20th July, 2019 15:09 IST ‘Das The Way To Go, Girl!’: Amul’s Latest Topical Celebrates Hima Das Winning Four Golds In 15 Days Amul has yet again won the hearts of netizens with their latest topical ad. This time the topical is celebrating India’s young athlete, Hima Das. Das has won four gold medals in 15 days making the entire nation proud. In the topical, you can see Das with the four medals and with the national flag and is captioned ‘Das the way to go, girl!’  READ | Hima Das Clinches 4th Gold In 15 Days, Proud Netizens Salute ‘Unstoppable’ Sprinter Amul has yet again won the hearts of netizens with their latest topical ad. This time the topical is celebrating India’s young athlete, Hima Das. Das has won four gold medals in 15 days making the entire nation proud. In the topical, you can see Das with the four medals and with the national flag and is captioned ‘Das the way to go, girl!’ See the topical here: READ | Hima Das Receives Young Achievers Award At Republic Achievers Awards 2019Hima is indeed on a roll and it seems that she is ready to overcome all the obstacles in her way.  Since she has added yet another feather in her cap, let us take a look back at the 19-year-old’s feat which has been achieved so far. WATCH US LIVE Digital Desk FOLLOW US First Published: 20th July, 2019 14:11 IST This one’s one of the recent bests @Amul_Coop. DAS the test of India! Cheers!!— Amit Daundkar (@amit_daundkar) July 19, 2019 1 year ago WATCH THIS: Dutee Chand’s spectacular sprint which won her the 100m gold at the World University games in Napoli, Italy LIVE TVlast_img read more

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Cycling: Armstrong backs investigation into murky past

first_imgLance Armstrong welcomed an investigative report into the murky past of cycling’s governing body and said he hopes it can help the sport move on from an era that will always be remembered for the doping by himself and others.The report turned up no evidence to sustain previous allegations that Armstrong paid the UCI to cover up a positive doping test back in his heyday, yet it explains in great detail how the UCI acted favorably toward Armstrong — a rider dubbed “cycling’s pop star.”The Cycling Independent Reform Commission (CIRC) was requested by Brian Cookson, the current UCI president. Its report examined how the doping culture during Armstrong’s era was allowed to fester under the previous UCI leadership of former president Pat McQuaid and predecessor Hein Verbruggen.“I am grateful to CIRC for seeking the truth and allowing me to assist in that search. I am deeply sorry for many things I have done,” Armstrong said in a statement. “It is my hope that revealing the truth will lead to a bright, dope-free future for the sport I love, and will allow all young riders emerging from small towns throughout the world in years to come to chase their dreams without having to face the lose-lose choices that so many of my friends, teammates and opponents faced.”Armstrong is trying to overturn a life ban imposed by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. He was stripped of his seven Tour titles for doping on every one of his wins from 1999-2005.Armstrong’s attorney, Elliot Peters, said Armstrong “cooperated fully” with senior investigators over two days, answering all questions “without any restrictions” and providing “all documents requested to which he had access.” In their affidavits provided to USADA — whose scathing report in 2012 exposed systematic doping by Armstrong and others — former U.S. Postal teammates Tyler Hamilton and Floyd Landis declared that Armstrong had told them separately that he tested positive for the performance enhancer EPO at the 2001 Tour de Suisse.Landis claimed that the test was hushed up as a result of a financial agreement with Verbruggen.Armstrong was tested five times during the 2001 Tour de Suisse. Three samples were tested for EPO and they came back negative, although there was a “strong suspicion” that two of the “A” samples did contain traces of the banned blood booster, the CIRC report said — adding that it deemed inappropriate the fact that “Armstrong and his entourage were informed by the UCI of these suspect test results.”A year later, Armstrong sent Verbruggen a letter containing a check for $25,000 as a donation toward the fight against doping. Although CIRC has “not found any indication of a financial agreement” the report said the “UCI did not act prudently in accepting a donation from an athlete” already under suspicion.The collusion between Armstrong and the UCI’s leadership features strongly in the 227-page report. Armstrong’s lawyers were allowed to draft parts of a supposedly independent report, which sought to debunk French daily L’Equipe’s claims in 2005 that Armstrong’s samples at the 1999 Tour later tested positive for EPO.The independent report into the ’99 allegations, which was led by Dutch lawyer Emile Vrijman, was heavily criticized because it “specifically excluded an examination of the EPO test,” meaning it deliberately avoided addressing whether Armstrong used the substance. The Vrijman report coincided with an agreement between Armstrong and the UCI that he would donate $100,000 for the purchase of a Sysmex blood testing machine. This prompted allegations that his latest donation to the UCI’s anti-doping cause was an indirect payment to help fund the Vrijman report and quash L’Equipe’s story.The CIRC did not find “any evidence to corroborate” such allegations but said the UCI acted improperly “in soliciting and accepting donations from an athlete” under increasing suspicion.The close-knit relationship helped Armstrong on the ’99 Tour when he tested positive for a banned corticosteroid. Armstrong did not declare pre-race that he was using medication — even though the argument he used for using a corticoid cream was to treat saddle sores. Rather than start disciplinary proceedings, the UCI accepted a backdated prescription and cleared him. Armstrong, having retired after the 2005 Tour, was also cleared by the UCI to make his comeback at Australia’s Tour down Under in 2009 — despite not being eligible because he had not been in the UCI’s doping testing pool for a six-month period beforehand.McQuaid first wrote to Armstrong, firmly telling him he could not race. But two days after that, McQuaid informed him that he could compete. The same day, Armstrong told McQuaid that he would race in the 2009 Tour of Ireland, which McQuaid was keen to promote in his homeland.In one email sent to McQuaid, written at the time of USADA’s impending investigation, a UCI consultant refers to Armstrong as “cycling’s pop star” and states clearly that for the sake of its image the “UCI has an interest that LA is acquitted.”last_img read more

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Minnie Bush, 78, Wellington: May 17, 1936 – June 1, 2014

first_imgMinnie BushMinnie Bush, 78, of Wellington passed away Sunday, June 1, 2014 at the Sumner Regional Medical Center in Wellington.Funeral Services will be held at 2 p.m., Thursday, June 5, 2014 at the First Free Will Baptist Church in Wellington. Visitation will be Wednesday, June 4, 2014 from 1 p.m. until 8 p.m. with the family receiving friends from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Shelley Family Funeral Home in Wellington.Burial will be in the Prairie Lawn Cemetery. A memorial has been established with the First Free Will Baptist Church of Wellington and may be left with the Shelley Family Funeral Home. Funeral arrangements are with the Shelley Family Funeral Home of Wellington. For further information please visit www.shelleyfamilyfh.com.Minnie Lee Bush was born the daughter of William and Gertrude (Laney) Kelley on May 17, 1936 in Higdon, Arkansas. Minnie lived in Kellyville, OK, Bushy Head, OK, and Winfield, KS, before moving to Wellington in 1966. She received her GED in 1979. Minnie was a Restorative Therapy Aide at the Good Samaritan Center in Wellington for 35 years retiring in 2001. She enjoyed babysitting her grandchildren and great grandchildren. Her hobbies included quilting and needlepoint.Minnie is survived by her children: Johnnie Phares of Oklahoma City, Ocie Hartman of Cripple Creek, Colo., Tartus Bush of Hennessey, Okla. and Leota Tooman of Wellington, KS; 9 grandchildren, 19 great grandchildren and a brother Bill Kelley.She is preceded in death by her parents, 2 sisters and 2 brothers.last_img read more

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