Funk Trio Organ Freeman To Support TAUK For Hollywood Throwdown

first_imgUp-and-coming L.A. funk trio Organ Freeman continues to make moves, as the band keeps things funky and will soon appear at Brooklyn Comes Alive. Today, the band has been announced as support for TAUK, playing a hometown show at The Roxy in Hollywood, CA. These two instrumental fusion groups are guaranteed to throw it down when they get together on November 4th.With a new album out in just a couple weeks, TAUK’s uniquely instrumental brand of progressive funk fusion had earned them a great reputation. Their live shows are downright infectious, and the energy of new music is sure to translate into great playing! When you combine that energy with the all-out funk jamming of Organ Freeman, it’s a sure fire recipe for success.You can’t help but grin when you hear that a band is named Organ Freeman. That grin turns into an all-out smile when you listen to their music, a soulful-yet-peppy blend of instrumental jazz fusion that takes no prisoners. It’s some serious toe-tapping jives, fueled by the trio hard at work: guitarist Erik Carlson, drummer Rob Humphreys and organist Trevor Steer.Check out all of the information about the show in the artwork below, and get tickets here.last_img read more

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A pioneering mind for the power of design

first_imgAs a sophomore at Wellesley College, Adele Fleet Bacow was attracted to architecture and art. Soon, after enrolling in a course on urban sociology, she found a passion that combined her love for the arts with her desire to help enhance the vitality of neighborhoods and communities.The only problem was that Bacow had to develop her own major, since the path she envisioned didn’t exist at her college. Fortunately, a cross-registration program had recently been established between Wellesley and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Creating a major in urban design, she was able to draw greedily from classes in the schools of architecture and urban planning at MIT.The experience was not exactly new. Growing up as the fourth of five siblings in a close-knit family in Jacksonville, Fla., she was used to charting her own course.“It was wonderful to be part of a large family,” said Bacow in an interview at Loeb House. “There is never someone doing things for you, for the most part. You learn to be fairly independent and forge your own way.”Now, Bacow is looking forward to leaving her imprint at Harvard.On a recent Monday morning, Bacow spoke with parents, helped carry boxes, and posed for photos as she and her husband, Harvard President Larry Bacow, welcomed first-years to campus. It was, in many ways, a continuation of the warm and personable style the Bacows demonstrated as first couple at Tufts, where they hosted senior dinners, served pancakes to students during reading period, and once performed a hip-hop dance with faculty that nearly brought down the house. In her new role, Bacow plans to stay connected to student life, but with limits.“We have a lot of energy, but I’m not promising hip-hop,” she said, breaking into laughter.A Wellesley College graduate with a master’s degree in city planning from MIT, Bacow feels fortunate to have built a career that combined her interests in community development and the arts, while also helping to raise two sons and supporting her husband’s pursuits as a scholar and higher ed leader.At the helm of Community Partners Consultants, a firm she founded in 1996, Bacow’s work focused on urban planning, cultural economic development, and the arts. Throughout her career as a city planner and urban designer, Bacow has worked with cities and towns, state agencies, and community-based organizations focusing on economic and community development, design, and the arts. Her work in the public and private sectors led her to advocate for better public environments and to promote design that highlighted the revitalization of downtowns, urban spaces, and public facilities. Much of her work drew upon the symbiosis of arts and community development.Design, said Bacow, is neither a “frill” nor merely “aesthetics.” It affects the lives of communities because it is closely tied to economic development. In 1995, she published “Designing the City: A Guide for Advocates and Public Officials” as a manual to inform efforts to improve “the way communities are planned, designed, and built.”“People used to say, ‘Why should I worry about design when there are more important things, such as schools and education?’” noted Bacow. “When I wrote the book, many mayors said they wanted their cities to have a better design because it benefits their communities. It improves their living environment, which attracts workers, businesses, and increases property values and tax revenues.”Bacow’s influence on urban design has left a mark, said Gary Hack, professor emeritus of urban planning at MIT, where he led the Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Bacow and Hack met at the school while she was taking a course in urban design and architecture.“Adele was a pioneer in the field,” said Hack. “Back then, people thought economic development involved making industrial parks to attract companies to locate their offices or production factories. Not many people thought about the quality of design as an important tool to attract businesses to their communities. She made a career out of the intersection of design and economic development.”As director of design and development at the Massachusetts Council on the Arts and Humanities, Bacow created a statewide program to advance the quality of design and planning. For her work with the council, she was awarded a Federal Design Achievement Award from the Presidential Design Awards program. She also served as deputy director of the Massachusetts Government Land Bank, responsible for the redevelopment of blighted properties and former military bases.Anne Hawley, who as executive director of the Council on the Arts and Humanities hired Bacow, recalled the role Bacow played in helping government officials advance design in the public interest. Bacow worked with main streets and small towns that were struggling with runaway development. She also organized bridge design workshops for engineers at the Department of Public Works and brought in Swiss bridge designer Christian Menn to chair a bridge design competition. Menn would play an influential role in the design concept for the cable-stayed Zakim Bridge over the Charles River.“Adele made people in government understand that design was an important part of everyday life,” said Hawley, who went on to direct the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum from 1989 to 2015.“The Zakim Bridge was a result of her work. She helped us understand that design could improve public places and public life. From rural Massachusetts to the bridges, she figured out a way to involve architectural designers in enhancing theenvironment.”To connect government officials to the ways design impacted their communities, Bacow commissioned Anne Mackin and Alex Krieger to write “A Design Primer for Cities and Towns,” which was distributed to planning, conservation, and historic preservation boards across the state.“At that time, when the primer was published [in 1989], there was a growing concern about sprawling America and how it was becoming more suburban-focused at the expense of the quality of our towns and villages,” said Krieger, a professor in practice of urban design at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.“Adele was determined, among others, to reinstigate a discussion about what makes good communities. She has been a great advocate for urban design and preservation and continuation of quality of life in our cities, small towns, and villages.”Over the past two decades, as cities and downtown centers suffered blight and decay, Bacow began promoting the arts as a tool to spur economic and community development.“I thought it was a bit schizophrenic at first, in integrating the fields of the arts and economic development, but now you see it recognized everywhere,” Bacow said. “People have realized the value of the arts in community and economic development.”Some of Bacow’s favorite projects include strategic plans for Artists for Humanity’s EpiCenter in Boston, business plans for community development corporations working to create jobs for low-income people nationwide, a master plan and economic development strategy for the Worcester Arts District, and a plan for an arts and cultural district for downtown Beverly, Mass.For Bacow, who grew up in a family that loved art, music, and culture, the role of arts is paramount to quality of life. Her father, a pediatrician, and her mother, a trained pianist and an active volunteer, would take their five children to local cultural events.“I have art in my soul,” said Bacow, who plans to bring a baby grand piano to Elmwood, the Harvard president’s house.Asked what she would have been had she not become an urban planner, Bacow said that she contemplated becoming a journalist or a high school art teacher, and that earlier in life she entertained the “fantasy” of being a ballet dancer. But becoming an urban planner was a perfect marriage of her love for the arts and her desire to help improve communities. It was a desire born in her teenage years when her work as a Head Start volunteer in Jacksonville took her across the railroad tracks on her bike and opened her eyes to segregation in her home city.“I didn’t realize how important that experience was,” Bacow said. “But in college, while taking an urban sociology class, I went back to those memories and I became interested in issues such as inner cities, community, and economic development.”As for her life at Harvard, Bacow said she relishes being surrounded by young learners and expects to maintain a healthy balance between her diverse interests and family life, which now includes Harvard students.“I spent my whole adult life around college students,” Bacow said. “I think it’s the best age in the world. College students are so full of life and promise, optimism, and idealism. There is nothing better.”last_img read more

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Female WWII Correspondents Featured in Long Island Museum

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Famed for her photos of emaciated survivors found inside Nazi concentration camps, among many other historic images, Margaret Bourke-White was also the first female American foreign war correspondent allowed in combat zones.The trailblazing Life magazine photojournalist—dubbed “Maggie the Indestructible” after surviving multiple brushes with death during World War II—is one of the nine female war correspondents featured in “Women Who Brought the War Home,” an exhibit at the American Airpower Museum at Republic Airport in East Farmingdale.“The legacy is in the imagery and the text,” said Julia Lauria-Blum, who was inspired to curate the exhibit eight years ago after reading The Women Who Wrote the War by Nancy Caldwell Sorel.Lauria-Blum shared their stories as the museum hosted busloads of World War II veterans and their families who came for the opening of the permanent exhibit over the Memorial Day Weekend, ahead of the 70th anniversary of D-Day next week.The exhibit includes a mannequin depicting a female war correspondent in an authentic encampment surrounded by period memorabilia, such as an antique typewriter and camera, with photographs borrowed from the National Archives. A dedication to nine of the featured women is displayed adjacent to the encampment, showcasing their pictures and biographies of their accomplishments. Lauria-Blum noted how the women gave voice to World War II through fearless and riveting reporting and photography.It is in those stories where the true meaning can be found, said Lauria-Blum while dressed in WWII-era military attire along with more than a dozen volunteers also sharing stories with museum visitors. Without them, she adds, the artifacts that the museum collects are just “lifeless memorabilia without the stories behind them.”last_img read more

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Joy Sports Transfer Daily: Monday’s top 20 stories

first_imgREMY’S FUTURE HlNGES ON PATO DEALChelsea are ready to let Loic Remy move to Crystal Palace before next Monday’s deadline – as long as the Blues secure Alexandre Pato.Remy, who played under Eagles boss Alan Pardew at Newcastle, has always been one of Palace’s top January targets but looked set to stay at Chelsea.However, some movement in the Pato deal over the last 24 hours has led to renewed optimism Remy and Pardew could be reunited.There is a deal agreed in principle with Emmanuel Adebayor should Palace’s other options fall through, but the former Spurs man wants wages of nearly £80k per week and is expected to be way short of the fitness level required to make an instant impact.Khouma Babacar of Fiorentina and Islam Slimani of Sporting Lisbon are both likely to be too expensive for the Eagles in this window, whose striking crisis has worsened with Connor Wickham’s three-game ban for violent conduct in the Spurs match.GERVINHO ‘SAYS HIS GOODBYES’Ivory Coast striker Gervinho has moved a step closer to leaving Roma after saying farewell to team-mates ahead of his proposed move to Chinese side Hebei Fortune, reports revealed on Monday.Speaking ahead of Roma’s last outing – a 1-0 defeat to Serie A champions Juventus – Giallorossi sporting director Mauro Baldissoni confirmed Gervinho had asked for a transfer.”I can confirm we’re currently in talks, we’ve received interesting offers and when a player wants to leave the club there’s little you can do,” Baldissoni said.”It could be settled very quickly.”WATFORD CLOSE ON SUAREZ Watford are finalising a deal with Fiorentina for Mario Suarez that would see him join the Premier League side on a permanent four-year deal.The Hornets are hoping to complete the deal soon, with the club confident personal terms will not hold up the deal.REAL HAVE OZIL BUY-BACK CLAUSEReal Madrid have a buy-back clause in their transfer agreement with Arsenal for Mesut Ozil, according to leaked transfer documents.A contract on the Football Leaks website shows that the Gunners must notify Real if they ever intend to sell the World Cup winner to another Spanish club.The financial terms of the offer received for the Germany playmaker would be disclosed to Real, who would have 48 hours to decide whether to match the offer, or until noon, London time, on the final day of the relevant transfer window, whichever comes first.Should a rival Spanish club sign Ozil for more than 50m euros, Real would be entitled to 33 per cent of the profit. GUARIN NEARING INTER EXITInter Milan midfielder Fredy Guarin is set to leave the San Siro to join Shanghai Shenhua.The Colombia international has already accepted terms with the Chinese club’s could leave as Monday evening, with conformation of an agreement between Inter and Shenhua the last obstacle before Guarin can fly out to join his new team-mates.Shenhua fought off competition for Guarin from Jiangsu Suning, who Sky sources understand have turned their attention to Chelsea midfielder Ramires.DOUMBIA CHASE Marseille and AC Milan are both set to make late transfer window offers for Swansea and Leicester target Seydou Doumbia. RAMIRES SET FOR CHINA?Chelsea midfielder Ramires could be set for a shock £25million transfer to Chinese Super League side Jiangsu Suning – teaming up with former Blues ace Dan Petrescu.Ramires only signed a new four-year deal at Stamford Bridge in October, but has fallen down the pecking order under Guus Hiddink and hasn’t started a Premier League game since the Dutchman’s arrival.Money is being pumped into the Chinese Super League and Jiangsu are hoping to make a title bid this year. They’re already set to sign former Arsenal winger Gervinho from Roma and hope to resurrect a deal for AC Milan striker Luiz Adriano.Petrescu, hired in July, has already led the side to the 2015 Chinese FA Cup. The club are owned by the Guoxin Group, China’s largest project tendering and procurement company.MAGPIES AFTER STRIKER Newcastle United are set to make another attempt at trying to lure Lyon striker Alexandre Lacazette to the Magpies.NO TALKSSouthampton are in no rush to hold contract talks with Graziano Pelle despite speculation over his future. NO SALEHertha Berlin will not sell United States international John Brooks to Bundesliga rivals Schalke, the club’s CEO Michael Preetz said after Royal Blues chief Clemens Tonnies suggested they have already contacted the player to sound out the chances of a possible winter transfer. NO DROGBA Didier Drogba will not return to Chelsea this season after deciding to see out the final year of his contact with Montreal Impact, interim manager Guus Hiddink has confirmed. WILD DUTCH CHASE Gregory van der Wiel has stalled on signing a new contract with Paris Saint-Germain.Chelsea or Manchester United bound, perhaps? NO AUBA SALE Borussia Dortmund would not sell Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang even if a club were to offer €100 million for the African Player of the Year, CEO Hans-Joachim Watzke has said.CLUBS IN FOR BALOTELLI?West Ham United and West Brom are hopeful of landing controversial Liverpool striker Mario Balotelli.The former Manchester City striker could become available following reports AC Milan are ready to terminate his temporary loan deal at the San Siro.MILAN AFTER BEN ARFA?Nice attacker Hatem Ben Arfa is a transfer target for AC Milan. Ben Arfa, 28, has helped lift his side to third in Ligue 1 this season with 10 goals in 21 matches and it is reported that Milan have enquired about the former Newcastle player’s plans for this summer. TIOTE LEFT OUT IN THE COLDShanghai Shenhua are considering alternative transfer targets after appearing to go cold on Cheick Tiote.Newcastle midfielder Tiote, 29, was expected to finalise his switch to the Chinese Super League side last week.Shanghai had agreed an £8m fee with Newcastle and verbally agreed terms with Tiote.But the deal stalled with Shanghai failing to firm up their interest and present Tiote and his representatives with a formal offer.Tiote is now understood to be weighing up offers from a number of Shanghai’s Chinese rivals.Meanwhile, Shanghai are now in talks with Inter Milan midfielder Fredy Guarin and retain an interest in ­Chelsea’s Jon Obi Mikel.UNITED EYEING NEW KEEPER?Italian website Tuttomercatoweb report that the Manchester United are monitoring Genoa goalkeeper Mattia Perin.The 23-year-old made his Italy debut in 2014 after making the Azzurri’s 23-man squad for the World Cup in Brazil.Reds Devils scouts have been dispatched to watch the high-rated gloveman, with Liverpool also reportedly interested in him, as they seek to solve their problems between the sticks.KLOPP QUIET ON TEIXEIRAJurgen Klopp is remaining tight-lipped on speculation linking Liverpool with Alex Teixeira.The attacker has told Shakhtar Donetsk he wants to leave.But Klopp said: “It’s absolutely nothing to say.“Maybe it surprises you. Nothing to say to things like this.”LEICESTER KEEN ON EDERLeicester are in talks with Sampdoria over the signing of striker Eder, according to Sky in Italy.Foxes manager Claudio Ranieri admitted last week he was interested in signing a new forward before the transfer deadline and Eder is one of a number of targets.eIt is understood Sampdoria want a fee of around £10m for the 29-year-old Italy international, who was born in Brazil.LAVEZZI LATESTChelsea face competition from Inter Milan to the signing of PSG’s Ezequiel Lavezzi.The Argentina international’s contract in France expires in the summer but Inter are prepared to make a January swoop for the striker.This series is from the team at 99.7FM, tracking the latest moves in the January transfer window. We call it the #JoySports Transfer Daily. Here, we summarize all the moves and rumours in a quick, easy to read format. The series started in January 4 and ends on February 1.When does the transfer window open?The transfer window opens  on Saturday, January 2, 2016.Is that the same across Europe?No, the transfer window in France also opens on January 2 but Premier League clubs will have to wait until at least January 4 to sign players from Italy or Spain. The transfer window in Germany opens on New Year’s Day.Any deals between Premier League clubs and players in Spain will have to be wrapped up 24 hours before the window closes in England – the deadline in Spain is 11pm (GMT) on January 31. The windows in France and Italy close on the same day as in England, with the German transfer window shutting at 5pm on February 2.–Follow Kweku on Twitter: @nana_odum. Get more updates on Facebook/Twitter with the #JoySports hashtaglast_img read more

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Statistic shows: Dragons achieved 62.96 % Success in 2015

first_imgNational football team of B&H did not managed to qualify for the big competition in 2015. To recall, team of Ireland eliminated Dragons in the play-offs of the EP and left B&H in the waiting room for the third time. However, statistically speaking, last year was one of the most successful years.Mehmed Bazdarevic’s team played a total of 9 matches. They recorded 5 wins, 2 draws and 2 losses.They won against Andorra (twice), Israel, Wales and Cyprus. Dragons achieved drew against Austria (in friendly match) and Ireland in the first play-off match that was played in Zenica. They lost in a duel with Belgium and play-off in Dublin. This represents the success of 62.96 %.Although Dzeko and his team mates failed in a key two matches of play-offs, according to results, only two years were more successful than 2015.Thus, the performance in 2003 was 66.67 %, when the team was led by Blaz Sliskovic, while in 2013, the performance was 66.66 %, at the time when the head of the national team was Safet Susic.Everything suggests that the coach Mehmed Bazdarevic will have difficult job in 2016, and it is obvious that the change of generations is necessary.(Source: Edin Isanovic/Klix.ba)last_img read more

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