The California Honeydrops Cover R. Kelly, Al Green & More In NYC Throwdown [Watch]

first_imgThe California Honeydrops put their soulful rock n’ roll on display at the Bowery Ballroom last night, November 13th, playing to a packed house at the NYC venue. The band rolled out a ton of original music, and slipped in a few great covers as well. Fortunately, Marc Millman Photography was on the scene to capture the magic.Check out videos from last night’s performance, below.“Let’s Go Get Stoned”“Bump & Grind”“I’ve Never Found A Girl”last_img

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Court voids its workers’ comp rules

first_img Court voids its workers’ comp rules Gary Blankenship Senior Editor The Supreme Court has declined to adopt proposed amendments for workers’ compensation procedural rules, saying constitutionally the court does not have — and never has had — authority to promulgate such rules.The December 2 opinion settled a dispute about whether the court or the Division of Administrative Hearings, which oversees the Office of the Judges of Compensation Claims, is in charge of procedural rules for workers’ compensation cases.The court came down definitively on the side of DOAH, even receding from a 1973 decision it made and finding a state law invalid where the legislature gave the court authority to promulgate the rules.The rules issue arose after DOAH last year set out its own procedural rules, citing a 1993 state law that gave it that authority. The rules committee proceeded with its biennial rules review of the court-approved rules. It and the Bar’s Workers’ Compensation Section said a 1974 law as well as the court’s 1973 ruling in In Re: Workmen’s Compensation Rules of Procedure, 285 So. 2d 601 (Fla. 1973), gave the court authority over the rules.“[The ruling] will help get things to settle down a little bit, without the cloud of controversy settling over us,” said Judge S. Scott Stephens, the compensation judge who last year prepared the DOAH-approved rules. “It’s very important for the attorneys to know what to expect procedurally.”DOAH has already set up a 14-person committee to review and refine its rules, Stephens said, and it includes members from the Bar’s Workers’ Compensation Section, compensation judges, and lawyers who represent the plaintiffs and defense bar. The panel held its first meeting on December 8.“Our goal is to have rules of procedure that are tolerable for everybody and apply to everybody across the state,” he said.Stephens said he doesn’t think the transition to the DOAH rules will be difficult because compensation judges, as far as he knows, have been using the agency rules since February 2003. He also noted that the court made its ruling prospective only, which will prevent reopening old cases because of procedural questions.Representatives from the Rules of Workers’ Compensation Committee and the Bar’s Workers’ Compensation Section said they were disappointed with the decision, but expect to work well with DOAH on maintaining the new rules.Committee Chair Jeff Jacobs noted that former Justice Arthur England, in a case subsequent to the 1973 ruling, wrote a dissent that was essentially adopted by the court in its new opinion.“His dissent was always regarded as well reasoned and judicially sound,” Jacobs said. “It was important for the Supreme Court to decide the conflict [over the rules] and they decided. The decision was welcomed in that regard. It was disappointing that the courts after 31 years receded from its earlier opinion.”He added, “We’re confident that the Division of Administrative Hearings and the Office of the Judges of Compensation Claims will write a proper set of rules and the system will carry on.”Nancy Cavey, chair of the Workers’ Compensation Section, said, “While we disagree and are disappointed with the Supreme Court’s decision, we reluctantly accept the same. We look forward to working with Chief Judge Robert Cohen and Deputy Chief Judge Scott Stephens of DOAH in promulgating rules of workers’ compensation procedure that will provide for fair and expeditious resolution of workers’ compensation cases.”The Supreme Court’s per curiam opinion noted that the Florida Constitution vests the Supreme Court with the power to write procedural rules for all courts of the state, and the constitution further defines those courts as the Supreme Court, the district courts of appeal, and the circuit and county courts. “The Office of the Judges of Compensation Claims (OJCC) is not a court of this state because it is neither the Supreme Court, a district court of appeal, a circuit court, nor a county court,” the opinion said.In earlier rulings, the justices have held the workers’ comp proceedings are only quasi-judicial and that judges of compensation claims are members of the executive branch, not the judiciary.“Given that the OJCC is not an Article V court, but rather part of an executive department, we find that this court has no authority under the Florida Constitution, nor has this court ever had the constitutional authority to promulgate rules of practice and procedure for this executive entity. We recede from the decision in In re Florida Workmen’s Compensation Rules of Procedure. . . to the extent that that case and all subsequent cases conclude that this court had jurisdiction to promulgate such rules. We conclude that this court must be removed from this rulemaking process, and the rules this court has adopted must be repealed as unauthorized under the Florida Constitution.”Further, since the OJCC is part of the executive branch, the legislature is without power to give the court authority to write such rules, because that would violate the separation of powers doctrine, the opinion said.“In conclusion, the Workers’ Compensation Rules of Procedure constitute an unconstitutional encroachment on the power of the executive branch to adopt rules of procedure for its own agencies,” the court said, “Accordingly, we hereby repeal this body of rules, effective immediately. In order to ensure that our actions today do not create an upheaval of decades of workers’ compensation law, we hold that our repeal of the Florida Rules of Workers’ Compensation shall operate prospectively, and shall not affect any workers’ compensation proceedings that are final.”The court ruled in Amendments to the Florida Rules of Workers’ Compensation Procedure, case no. SC04-110. The complete text of the opinion can be found at the courts Web site, www.floridasupremecourt.org. The ruling was unanimous, although Justice Fred Lewis concurred in the result only. December 15, 2004 Senior Editor Regular News Court voids its workers’ comp ruleslast_img read more

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Former cricketer Sunnette Viljoen bags silver in javelin at Olympics

first_imgFormer South Africa Women allrounder Sunnette Viljoen, who has played one Test and 17 ODIs, created history on Thursday by bagging a silver medal in the women’s javelin final of the Rio Olympics.Viljoen, 33, finished second behind Croatia’s Sara Kolak, with her best throw of 64.92 metres compared to Kolak’s 66.18 metres. Viljoen’s medal was the ninth for South Africa who are currently placed 34th overall with one gold, six silvers and two bronze medals.She had come agonisingly close to winning a medal at the London 2012 Olympics but finished fourth with a best throw of 64.53 metres, behind Germany’s Linda Stahl, who finished third with 64.91.Viljoen played her only Test against India in March 2002 in Paarl, scoring 17 and 71. She had made her ODI debut in 2000 and finished her ODI career two years later with 198 runs and five wickets.(ESPN Cricinfo)last_img read more

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