Two imprisoned TV journalists consigned to oblivion in runup to elections

first_img Organisation March 15, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two imprisoned TV journalists consigned to oblivion in runup to elections Reporters Without Borders voiced “great concern” today that, although general elections are due in exactly two months (on 15 May), two journalists with the Oromo-language service of the state-owned Ethiopian Television (ETV), Shiferraw Insermu and Dhabassa Wakjira, continue to be subjected to prolonged detention on suspicion of links with an Oromo separatist group. News Receive email alerts News RSF condemns NYT reporter’s unprecedented expulsion from Ethiopia News Journalist attacked, threatened in her Addis Ababa home RSF_en May 21, 2021 Find out more to go further February 10, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders voiced “great concern” today that, although general elections are due in exactly two months (on 15 May), two journalists with the Oromo-language service of the state-owned Ethiopian Television (ETV), Shiferraw Insermu and Dhabassa Wakjira, continue to be subjected to prolonged detention on suspicion of links with an Oromo separatist group.”As Ethiopians get ready to vote, two journalists continue to languish in a prison where cases of torture and mistreatment are regularly reported by international organizations,” Reporters Without Borders said.”Ethiopia is violating the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights just a few kilometres away from the Addis Ababa headquarters of the African Union,” the press freedom organization continued. “Whatever the charges against them, these two journalists have rights, and these have been clearly flouted by authorities who have defied the decisions of the federal high court. Insermu and Wakjira should have been released immediately under Ethiopian law. Reporters Without Borders added: “The circumstances in which they were thrown in prison leads us to suspect that there is absolutely no basis for the charge of terrorism that has been brought against them.”Insermu and Wakjira were initially arrested at home in Addis Ababa on 22 April 2004. The federal high court ordered their release on bail on 9 August but only Insermu was freed. He was re-arrested eight days later and released again on the federal high court’s orders in mid-October. As ETV refused to rehire him, he was seeking work as a journalist elsewhere when he was arrested for the third time on 11 January.Wakjira has meanwhile been held without interruption for nearly a year as the prison authorities ignored the various court orders to free him. According to the information obtained in Addis Ababa by Reporters Without Borders, both journalists were taken before a court on 2 March but the hearing was postponed. They are both currently held in the main Addis Ababa prison, known as Kerchiele.According to our information, they are charged under articles 32, 252 and 522 of the criminal code with passing government information to the leadership of the Oromo Liberation Front (OLF), planning attacks, criminal association of a terrorist nature and raising funds with a view to carrying out acts of terrorism. Insermu, in particular, is accused of sending government information to the OLF’s radio station Sagalee Bilisummaa Oromoo (the Voice of Oromo Liberation – SBO) “by e-mail or other means.”A former colleague now living in exile said Insermu and Wakjira were detained along with other Oromo employees of ETV who have since been released. Their arrests followed the broadcasting of a report about the use of violence by police to disperse an Oromo student demonstration on the Addis Ababa university campus on 4 January. The police arrested many demonstrators, especially members of the Macha Tulema social aid group who were protesting against the government’s decision to move Oromo regional bodies from Addis Ababa (called Finfinne by the Oromos) to Adama (also known as Nazret), 100 km east of the capital.Founded in 1974, the OLF is an armed movement that is opposed to Amhara and Tigrean dominance in Ethiopia and proposes that the Oromos of southern Ethiopia should form a separate country together with the Oromos of northern Kenya. The OLF is back by Eritrea, the former Ethiopian province where a guerrilla coalition waged an independence war against Addis Ababa from 1962 to 1991. Following Eritrean independence in 1993, the two countries fought a deadly territorial war from 1998 to 2000.Oromo community organizations and Oromo state employees are often the targets of government repression on the accusation of being OLF spies. The human rights report issued on 28 February by the US State Department, which has in the past tended to favour Ethiopia, was very critical of human rights violations “especially against persons suspected of being OLF members.”The difficulties encountered by Reporters Without Borders in obtaining information in Ethiopia about these two journalists indicate how sensitive the issue had become. After cross-checking, the organization has established that at least 12 Oromo journalists have fled to neighbouring countries since the start of 2004 to escape the repression in Ethiopia.Garuma Bekele, the managing editor of the weekly Urji, Tesfaye Deressa, its editor, and Solomon Nemera, one of its reporters, spent nearly four years in prison, from 1997 to 2001, for allegedly “participating in terrorist activities” and “publishing inaccurate news.” They had simply raised questions about an official statement that three men killed by the security forces were OLF members. EthiopiaAfrica Follow the news on Ethiopia Help by sharing this information May 18, 2021 Find out more News EthiopiaAfrica Ethiopia arbitrarily suspends New York Times reporter’s accreditationlast_img read more

Continue reading

Deputy McHugh says number of capital projects ready to go in Donegal

first_img Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Twitter NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly News Pinterest Twitter WhatsApp Help sought in search for missing 27 year old in Letterkenny Donegal North East Deputy Joe Mc Hugh has told the Dail that more capital projects should be started to boost the economy, and there are several ready to go in Donegal.During questions to Public Expenditure Minister Brendan Howlin, Deputy Mc Hugh quoted the economist John Maynard Keynes, who argued that the best way to tackle recession was to start major infrastructure projects which would create jobs and get money flowing in local communities.Deputy Mc Hugh outlined what could be done in North Donegal…………[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/joemc1pm.mp3[/podcast]Minister Howlin said he would be considering Deputy Mc Hugh’s points, and urged him to get support for his proposals from his Fine Gael colleagues.However, Minister Howlin stressed the key aim of economic policy for the next while will be to ensure a sustainable exit from the bailout…………[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/bhowl1pm.mp3[/podcast]center_img Previous article300 new engineering jobs set to be announced for OmaghNext articleUpdate – Council says start date for Dungloe and Glenties Sewage Schemes is “imminent” News Highland WhatsApp Google+ By News Highland – October 10, 2013 448 new cases of Covid 19 reported today Facebook Deputy McHugh says number of capital projects ready to go in Donegal Facebook Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Google+last_img read more

Continue reading

Historic District Workshop Set for Thursday

first_imgDownload (PDF, 9.68MB) Map shows Ocean City’s local Historic District outlined in red, and the State and National Registers of Historic Places outlined in black. The state map includes a dogleg that encompasses the historic Bellevue Hotel at Eighth Street and Ocean Avenue (which burned to the ground in September 2012). The local map includes an extension drawn to include the historic U.S. Life Saving Station No. 30 at Fourth Street and Atlantic Avenue. City Council invites the public to a workshop to discuss possible changes to the ordinance that governs Ocean City’s Historic District, a surviving collection of century-old homes in a roughly 16-block area bounded by Third Street and Eighth Street between Central and Ocean avenues.The workshop begins at 6 p.m. in City Council Chambers on the third floor of City Hall at Ninth Street and Asbury Avenue.Representatives from the State of New Jersey Historic Preservation office (who toured the local district in the spring)  and the Ocean City Historic Preservation Commission will be present to explain recommended changes. No formal action will be taken at the workshop meetingThe ordinance can be found in the PDF document below (with proposed changes in red).Most of the changes could be considered “housekeeping” updates to clarify and update language in the ordinance.But any change to the ordinance can be perceived by some as a burden to property owners. By a more than 2-to-1 margin among 76 respondents to a recent City Council survey, property owners said they would opt out of the district if they could.A 2007 inventory of historically designated properties lists 79 of 311 (about 25 percent) properties that are “noncontributing” (not historic), but all properties within the district must follow the same rules._________Sign up for free news updates from Ocean City__________District property owners were notified by certified mail of Thursday’s meeting. Council members had said they want to communicate the proposed revisions and solicit feedback before making any permanent changes to the ordinance.The proposed changes stem from an effort to preserve more historic homes in a slowly dwindling inventory. Ocean City’s district surrounds the Ocean City Tabernacle, the hub of the community at the time of Ocean City’s founding in the late 19th century.The draft ordinance includes no proposed changes to the Historic District map.If the district refuses to grant permission for a property owner to demolish a historic home, the period the property must be marketed for sale remains at six months.The Historic Preservation Commission had originally proposed a change to one year in an effort to make sure the property for sale could be seen in the summer.The Commission later compromised and proposed six months, as long as two of them were summer months. But a further suggestion that the peak times for real estate searches are in the shoulder seasons led the proposed amendment back to six months.If the peak real estate season were defined as March through October, any six-month stretch would include two peak months.Read moreHistoric? Or Just Old? Ocean City Considers Changes to Historic Districtlast_img read more

Continue reading

The Road To Rooster Walk: Lyle Divinsky Of The Motet Talks Songwriting

first_img“All of a sudden there’s a song – there in your hotel room playing your guitar – and you write it, and two or three years later it will come true. It keeps you on your toes.”These words, spoken by Townes Van Zandt, support a popular notion of the songwriter in American popular culture: A rambling man, on the road with a band, playing venues both squalid and splendid, creating songs from thin air with little more than a beat up guitar, bottle of booze and hotel notepad. And there’s no doubt that countless great tunes have been written in such a manner. But there’s another question worth asking: In 2017, are most songs written that way?To find out, we spoke with six songwriters who will be at the ninth annual Rooster Walk Music & Arts Festival over Memorial Day weekend (May 25-28) in Martinsville, Va. These six artists: Paul Hoffman (Greensky Bluegrass), Anders Osborne, Andrew Marlin (Mandolin Orange), Lyle Divinksy (The Motet), Marcus King, and Wood Robinson (Mipso) bring different backgrounds, hometowns, experience levels and genres to the craft of songwriting. Perhaps unsurprisingly, they write songs in different manners.Read on to learn about the unique process that Colorado-based band The Motet uses to create the songs you know and love. You can also catch Lyle with the Motet when they hit Fool’s Paradise this weekend!Editor’s Note: This is the first story in a six-part “Road to Rooster Walk” series about the craft and process of songwriting. When lead vocalist and hype-man-extraordinaire Lyle Divinsky got approached about joining The Motet a year and a half ago, his audition had little to do with stage presence or singing ability. Those were skills the band had already verified. Instead, Divinky’s tryout was largely about putting lyrics to a pair of instrumental songs the band had already demoed . . . before he’d met a single member of the group.“It was kind of a fun challenge to know that this was my audition for the band, to write for them, and to know that and to just get excited about how much fun their music was,” Divinsky said. “The Truth’ was the first song that I wrote and that one, I wrote most of it in three hours of sitting down. And then took, I think, a day or two to just kind of sit with it, make sure it was exactly what I wanted and just kind of fine tune a couple things. And then, ‘Fool No More’ was the second song that I wrote, and that one was pretty quick, as well. That one might have even been just a day.”When possible, Divinsky prefers to write from his in-home studio, where he’ll set up shop at his computer (which features basic recording software), a notepad, pen, and his phone. He’ll set the phone’s timer for three hours and then toss it across the room, “because I feel like three hours is about the amount of time that I can work productively without needing a full-on break.”When things are flowing freely, it can be a speedy process.“My favorite times are the ones where I sit down with a song, and like an hour-and-a-half later, the whole song’s written down, and I’m already recording the background harmonies to it,” he said.Like Anders Osborne, Divinsky is adamant in his goal to write something every day, even if that something isn’t a fully realized song or concept. He uses the voice recording app on his smartphone, or a small notepad that he carries in his pocket, to capture lyrical snippets or potential song ideas. These get transferred into a larger notebook or computer file, though when he heads into the studio with instrumental tracks waiting, he tries his best not to fall back on the lyrics he’s already started.“I like to go into it with a completely blank slate, because I think that gives me the chance to really interact with the song and see what can come of it,” Divinsky said. “But then if I’m having a hard time catching something, I’ll start going through hook lines, start going through lyrics that I’ve written, little poems and whatnot. You can get turned on by even just a word from one of those, and then that can send you off in the right direction.”Before joining The Motet, he wrote both lyrics and the music to go with them. But now, with a longstanding band of amazing musicians by his side, the job description has changed. And he loves it.“The melodies aren’t necessarily complete (when the song arrives to me). They’ll give me instrumentals and whatnot – drum, guitar, keys – the skeleton demo version of what they’re coming up with. And then I’ll put the song over it,” he said. “They give the foundation, and I kind of paint in the branches and the leaves and everything like that.”Divinksy is equally comfortable writing on the computer or with pen and paper. When he gets stuck on a song, he’s found that switching from computer to paper, or vice versa, can get him back on track. Thanks to his in-home studio, when he sends a potential song back to the band, it’s far more than an email with typed out verses and choruses.“Whenever I send my ideas back to the guys, it’s usually a fully realized (audio track), just so they can kind of hear it in the context that I intend it to be,” he said. “You know, sometimes it works super well, super quick.”Songwriters who influence Lyle: Bill Withers (“I think that he’s able to capture grandiose emotions in very simple words. So he’s a hero of mine for that.”) Lowell George, John Prine, Stevie Wonder.Song: “The Truth”Next Week on the Road to Rooster Walk: Greensky Bluegrasslast_img read more

Continue reading

Marijuana has ‘potentially devastating effects on young people’ – Bennett

first_imgRadio NZ News 23 January 2019Family First Comment: “She said the government’s smokefree goals clashed with its plans to hold the referendum and was contributing to its “ad hoc” and “confused” approach to drug reform.” #SayNopeToDope www.VoteNo.nzNational’s new spokesperson on drug reform says she has a raft of unanswered questions about next year’s referendum on legalising cannabis.A binding referendum on legalising cannabis for personal use will be held at the 2020 general election.Today National Party leader Simon Bridges announced that as part of a minor reshuffle, a new shadow portfolio on drug reform would be led by deputy leader Mrs Bennett.Mrs Bennett told 5 o’clock Report that while she was still weighing up whether she supported the referendum, her main concern was the impact of legalisation on young people.“I honestly worry about our young people and the evidence we’ve seen is that more of them access cannabis when their brains are still developing and it has the potential to have very devastating effects on them and I want to know the answers.”She said the government’s smokefree goals clashed with its plans to hold the referendum and was contributing to its “ad hoc” and “confused” approach to drug reform.She said other uncertainties included the wording of the question in the referendum, what would the administration regime look like, would THC levels be monitored, what would happen to illicit drug use, and the legal age for purchase of marijuana.READ MORE: https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/top/380681/marijuana-has-potentially-devastating-effects-on-young-people-bennettKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Continue reading

London Olympics: Teddy Riner wins gold in men’s 100+ kg judo

first_imgFrench judoka Teddy Riner won an Olympics gold in the men’s 100+ kg category on Friday, beating Russia’s Alexander Mikhaylin in the final. Riner, a bronze medalist in Beijing four years ago and a six-time World champion, won by waza-ari, depriving Russia of its fourth judo gold at the Games.”I have trained for this and I earned this medal,” Riner said, adding that he would now focus on retaining his Olympic title in Rio de Janeiro in four years’ time.”Next for me is Brazil at the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Olympic Games.”Mikhaylin is the reigining European champion and a three-time world champion.Earlier, German judoka Andreas Toelzer and Brazil’s Rafael Silva won the bronze medals. Toelzer beat Belarusian judoka Ihar Makarau by ippon, while Silva beat South Korea’s Sung-Min Kim by ippon in the golden score period.last_img read more

Continue reading

FS1’s Tim Brando: Notre Dame Will Eventually Join ACC Football, Is Key To Conference Launching Network

first_imgA Notre Dame cheerleader holding pompoms with the Notre Dame flag in the background.SOUTH BEND, IN – SEPTEMBER 30: A Notre Dame Fighting Irish cheerleader performs during a game against the Miami (Oh) Redhawks at Notre Dame Stadium on Seotember 30, 2017 in South Bend, Indiana. Notre Dame defeated Miami (OH) 52-17. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)This week, there has been a lot of noise made about the future of a possible ACC Network, which has been long discussed as a possibility for the league with ESPN. In a column on Campus Rush, Sports Illustrated‘s Pete Thamel called the network “imminent.” FOX Sports 1’s Tim Brando, who also calls ACC basketball games for Raycom Sports, doesn’t quite believe that we’ll see an ACC Network all that soon, but he does think it is coming, and the lynchpin to a launch is Notre Dame joining as a full conference member. That, he believes, will happen.Brando previously discussed Notre Dame’s role in the eventuality of the ACC Network on Twitter, and cleared things up a bit on “The Audible” podcast with Bruce Feldman and Stewart Mandel. Notre Dame/ACC talk starts around the 18-minute mark.On the ACC Network:“I do believe it’s going to happen, and I believe it’s going to happen when Notre Dame understands that it’s in their financial best interest to be in a conference, because they cannot command the same dollar from NBC or any other network by simply having seven home games televised. If you look at the revenues generated by both the Big Ten, the SEC, and the ACC without a network, as a conference member full time, they would, not only right now but certainly in the future, do much better than they are doing with their current arrangement. And I think that’s where we sit.”Brando says that if Notre Dame joins a conference in the next 10 years, the ACC is the only option:“No, Notre Dame cannot have a wandering eye. They not only signed a grant of rights with the ACC, but they signed an additional contract, which mandates that if they do become a conference member in football, there is no other place they can do that other than the Atlantic Coast Conference. And that’s through the year 2025. So (ACC commissioner) John Swofford and his people did a remarkable job when they brought Notre Dame in, to secure that when the Irish blue bloods decided ‘you know what, maybe it’s time to join a conference,’ they need to do that.”Perhaps most surprisingly, he predicts that this will unfold in the next three years.“I really believe that as we move forward, it’s a little early to be thinking about starting a linear network now, given the economics… It may not be the time in a year or two years, but in three years I believe you’ll be looking right down the pipe at an ACC Network, and I think the reason will be Notre Dame elected to become a full-time member.”The ACC is often viewed as the weakest of the Power 5 conferences, although with the Big 12’s issues, and the recent success of Clemson and Florida State, as well as a slew of strong hires this year, the league appears to be on solid ground. If it does, in fact, bring Notre Dame into the fold as a full member, it would be a massive coup for Swofford and company.[FOX Sports]last_img read more

Continue reading

Restructuring Will Enhance Work Of Coffee Board – Clarke

first_imgMinister of Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Roger Clarke, says restructuring of the Coffee Industry Board (CIB), now underway, is to improve its effectiveness in addressing the needs of the industry.“We have sought to separate the board in terms of administration from the business aspect of it. Things are changing and we will have to change with the times,” Mr. Clarke said.The Minister was speaking at the CIB long service awards function held on December 19 at the Pollyanna Caterers and Banqueters on Stanton Terrace.Mr. Clarke said that a team has been put in place “to work to see how the industry can be improved.” “It is not just about regulation but how we can do many things to lift the profile of the Jamaican coffee. There are many problems, not the least of these, your problem with roads and we have to deal with that because there are farmers, who probably cannot reach their farms because of the bad roads. As Government, we have to concentrate where we ought to concentrate and those are some of the things we will commit ourselves to,” the Agriculture Minister said.He added that research and development is also important in the development of the industry.Mr. Clarke noted also that the price for coffee has increased on the market, and if the country does not increase its production “we cannot be in the business.”“There are many places trying to copy us and trying to tell the world that they have as good a coffee as we have but they cannot outclass us. The CIB must be there to ensure that the integrity of Jamaica’s coffee remains a top priority,” Mr. Clarke said.“Too many fly by night people like to invade the territory and do all kinds of things,” he added.The CIB principal role is to promote, regulate, monitor and guide the development of the coffee industry and to assure the quality of Jamaican coffee.The board owns the Jamaica Blue Mountain® and Jamaican High Mountain Supreme® coffee trademarks and is responsible for the integrity of the brand.The management of the CIB recognised and awarded 38 employees both past and present who have over the years contributed to the success of the board.last_img read more

Continue reading