Alaska Highway travel advisory issued

first_imgMotorists are being advised of poor weather conditions on the Alaska Highway.A travel advisory has been issued for the highway between kilometre 340 to kilometre 589, due to poor visibility.The travel advisory states that it is currently snowing heavily in that area.- Advertisement -An update on road conditions will be given at Tuesday morning at 9am.For more updates call 250-774-6956last_img

Continue reading

Iranian-American in line to be Beverly Hills mayor

first_img“I’m very happy for Jimmy,” Webb said. “He’s been a friend of mine the past four years, so I have mixed feelings about today’s results. I’m sure he’ll do a fine job as mayor.” Beverly Hills mayors are not directly elected by voters. Rather, the five members of the City Council choose the mayor from among themselves to serve a one-year term. Delshad, first elected to the council in 2003, is next in line by seniority. BEVERLY HILLS – An Iranian-American claimed victory Friday in his run for re-election to the City Council, placing him in line to become the first Persian-born mayor of a community that for decades has been a hub for exiles of Iran’s 1979 revolution. “The mayor’s job in Beverly Hills is very important, very visible, and I think I’m up to it,” said Jimmy Delshad, 66, who received hugs from his wife and adult children when ballot tallies were announced. With the vote count still not official, Delshad had the second-highest number of votes, or 21.8 percent, which would give him one of the two at-large council seats up for grabs in Tuesday’s election. Councilman Steve Webb was third with 21 percent as of Friday evening and conceded. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Continue reading

Video: Never mind fat Ronaldo, here’s fake Ronaldo!

first_imgHave a look at this fella who invaded the pitch during Real Madrid’s friendly with Fiorentinalast_img

Continue reading

TRANSFER FIGHT! Villarreal ready to rival Everton for Man United’s Juan Mata

first_img1 Juan Mata in action for Manchester United Villarreal have emerged as contenders with Everton to sign Manchester United playmaker Juan Mata.The Spaniard is expected to leave Old Trafford this summer due to his frosty relationship with new manager Jose Mourinho, stretching back to their time together at Chelsea.Everton are keen on splashing the cash on the 28-year-old, with new boss Ronald Koeman aiming to revamp the current squad at Goodison Park.But, according to Super deporte, Villarreal are ready to offer Mata a chance to return to his native Spain and the La Liga club are expected to lodge a bid.Mata joined United from Chelsea in 2014 when David Moyes was in charge and is approaching 100 appearances for the Red Devils.However, he may not reach that landmark with Mourinho now at the helm, with the Portuguese having already brought in Henrikh Mkhitaryan to take Mata’s role.last_img read more

Continue reading

Every Premier League manager ranked on their playing career – worst to best!

first_img 20 16. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) – Howe is rightfully considered a legend for Bournemouth, seeing as his managerial wonders with the club come following a playing career spent largely with the same employers. A defender, he started his career with the Cherries, making over 200 appearances, before signing for Portsmouth. He later returned to Dean Court, on loan and then on a permanent deal. He was sadly forced to retire at age 30 due to recurring injury problems. (Playing honours – none). getty 20 20 6. Slaven Bilic (West Ham United) – Key to Bilic being hired by West Ham as manager in 2015 was his previous affiliation with the club and fans, having starred for the Hammers in 1996 and 1997. His performances at Upton Park were impressive enough to persuade Everton to cough up a then world record fee for a defender. Injuries and a poor Toffees team meant he struggled to recapture his Hammers form, but in the summer of 1998 Bilic was the cornerstone of the Croatia team that finished third at the World Cup. It was a golden era for Croatian football, but Bilic was a late bloomer among a team of stars that included Boban, Prosinecki and Suker. He started and finished his career with hometown club Hadjuk Split, also making 54 appearances for German side Karlsruhe, where he was voted best centre-back in the Bundesliga and became the first foreign captain in the German top flight. He won 44 caps for Croatia. (Playing honours – Yugoslav Cup: 1990/91; Prva HNL: 1992; Croatian Cup: 1992/93, 1999/2000). 4. Antonio Conte (Chelsea) – The Chelsea manager wasn’t hugely gifted technically as a footballer, but he is one of the most decorated and influential players in the history of Juventus. A tenacious midfielder, Conte started his career with Lecce, before joining Juve and captaining the team to Champions League triumph and five Serie A titles. He also won 20 caps for Italy, making the squads when the Azzuri finished runners up in the 1994 World Cup and Euro 2000, though he was a peripheral player with the national team. (Playing honours – Serie A: 1994/95, 1996/97, 1997/98, 2001/02, 2002/03; UEFA Champions League: 1995/96; Coppa Italia: 1994/95; Supercoppa Italiana: 1995, 1997, 2002, 2003; UEFA Cup: 1992/93; UEFA Super Cup: 1996; UEFA Intertoto Cup: 1999; Intercontinental Cup: 1996). 12. Sean Dyche (Burnley) – Dyche almost helped Chesterfield to surprise FA Cup glory 20 20 20 10. David Wagner (Huddersfield Town) – Wagner had a 15-year professional playing career in Germany, where his friendship with Jurgen Klopp began. The Huddersfield manager spent four years playing with Klopp for Mainz between 1990 and 1995. Wagner, a striker, was the more talented of the two and in 1995 earned a move to Schalke, where he won the UEFA Cup. He also made a handful of appearances on the international stage for both Germany and the United States. (Playing honours – UEFA Cup: 1996/97). 20 2. Mark Hughes (Stoke City) – One of the few current Premier League managers to have enjoyed top level playing success in England, Hughes won a host of trophies with Manchester United, Chelsea and Blackburn Rovers, as well as spending time with Barcelona, Bayern Munich, Southampton and Everton. A powerful striker, capped 72 times by Wales, his greatest success was with the Red Devils. He started his career at Old Trafford in 1980, and went on to win the Premier League, FA Cup, League Cup and Cup Winners’ Cup, before winning a fourth FA Cup with Chelsea. (Playing honours – Premier League: 1992/93, 1993/94; FA Cup: 1984/85, 1989/90, 1993/94, 1996/97; Football League Cup: 1991/92, 1997/98, 2001/02; Charity Shield: 1990, 1993, 1994; UEFA Cup Winners’ Cup: 1990/91, 1997/98; UEFA Super Cup: 1991). 14. Arsene Wenger (Arsenal) – A playing career of just 80 professional games, Wenger spent much of his time in the lower divisions of French football. He did, however, enjoy a run out in Ligue 1 for three seasons after signing for RC Strasbourg in 1978; he registered 11 top flight appearances before retiring from playing in 1981. A midfielder, who occasionally played as a sweeper, Wenger was praised for his leadership and coaching abilities – managing FC Duttlenheim after breaking into the first team as a 16-year-old. (Playing honours – Ligue 1: 1978/79). 3. Pep Guardiola (Manchester City) – The Barcelona legend started his career in La Masia, going on to make over 250 first team appearances for the Catalan club in an 11-year spell, from 1990 to 2001. A technical midfielder, Guardiola played as the pivot in Johan Cruyff’s ‘Dream Team’, and captained the side between 1997 and 2001. He later spent time in Italy with Roma and Brescia, as well as Al-Ahli and Dorados de Sinaloa in Qatar and Mexico, respectively. (Playing honours – La Liga: 1990/91, 1991/92, 1992/93, 1993/94, 1997/98, 1998/99; Copa del Rey: 1996/97, 1997/98; Supercopa de Espana: 1991, 1992, 1994, 1996; European Cup: 1991/92; UEFA Cup Winners’ Cup: 1996/97; UEFA Super Cup: 1992, 1997). 15. Tony Pulis (West Bromwich Albion) – A nomadic playing career as a defender saw Pulis take in four different British clubs across six separate spells. He also played 13 games for Hong Kong club Happy Valley AA, and was signed by Harry Redknapp when he was Bournemouth manager, going on to win his only trophy in his playing career. Despite never being considered a big talent, Pulis was often seen as a future manager due to his natural leadership skills. (Playing honours – Football League Third Division winner: 1986/87). 20 20 20. Jose Mourinho (Manchester United) – click the arrow above to take a look at our full ranking of Premier League managers based on their playing career – A legendary manager, maybe, but Mourinho’s playing career wasn’t quite so successful. He spent time with Portuguese club Belenenses (coached by his dad) and second division side Sesimbra, without turning pro, as well as playing under his father at Rio Ave. A midfielder and defender, Mourinho managed just 27 appearances for his final club, amateurs Comércio e Indústria, before retiring as a player aged only 24. (Playing honours – none). 5. Frank de Boer (Crystal Palace) – The most capped outfield player for the Netherlands, De Boer enjoyed a glittering 18-year professional career. With Ajax, the Dutch legend lifted five league titles, a Champions League and a UEFA Cup, and later he added a La Liga title with Barcelona to his personal trophy cabinet. His career ended in Qatar following spells with Galatasaray and Rangers. (Playing honours – Eredivisie: 1989/90, 1993/94, 1994/95, 1995/96, 1997/98; KNVB Cup: 1992/93, 1997/98; Johan Cruijff Shield: 1993, 1994, 1995; UEFA Champions League: 1994/95; UEFA Cup: 1991/92; UEFA Super Cup: 1995; Intercontinental Cup: 1995). The English Premier League is home to a selection of the world’s finest managers, but were they as successful as players?With a whole host of names having joined the top flight last season and throughout this summer, we’ve decided to compare each manager on how successful their career as a football player was.Scroll through the gallery above to find out where your Premier League club’s boss ranks on his ability on the field.center_img 20 13. Jurgen Klopp (Liverpool) – The Liverpool manager (above, right) was a one-club man as a player with Mainz 05. After a nomadic amateur career, the German joined Mainz in 1990, staying until 2001. He started his playing career as a striker, before moving to defence midway through his career. He played over 300 games with a reputation as a hard-working, but limited, lower-league player. (Playing honours – none). 20 9. Chris Hughton (Brighton and Hove Albion) – Hughton played 398 games for Tottenham in all competitions between 1977 and 1990, featuring with a number of Spurs’ greatest players. It would be easy to underestimate his ability given he took to the field with the likes of Glenn Hoddle, Chris Waddle and Paul Gascoigne. But Hughton was an important player and one of the club’s greatest full-backs, coming through from the youth academy to cement his place in the first team. He was an integral part of the team that won FA Cups in 1981 and 1982, as well the 1984 UEFA Cup. Hughton spent 13 years with Spurs before ending his career with short spells at West Ham and Brentford. He also won 53 caps for the Republic of Ireland, featuring in their memorable 1988 European Championship side, where they beat England. (Playing honours – FA Cup: 1981 and 1982; UEFA Cup: 1984; Charity Shield: 1981; Football League Division Three: 1991/92). 19. Paul Clement (Swansea City) – A playing career wasn’t a priority for Clement. The Swansea boss never emerged from non-league football, spending a few years apiece with Banstead Athletic and Corinthian-Casuals between 1988 and 1994. Football coaching was his priority from the age of 24 and he made a name for himself at the Chelsea centre of excellence. (Playing honours – none). 20 11. Craig Shakespeare (Leicester City) – Shakespeare is the best of the Premier League managers who built a career in the lower leagues. An attacking midfielder, he turned professional in 1981 at Walsall, where he helped the club to promotion to Division Two, via the playoffs, in the 1987/88 season. A year later he earned a move to then top flight Sheffield Wednesday, which didn’t quite work out, making only 17 appearances before leaving in 1990, but he went on to enjoy spells with West Bromwich Albion and Grimsby Town. (Playing honours – Third Division play-off winner: 1988). 18. Marco Silva (Watford) – Silva spent his entire playing career in Portugal but despite 15 years of experience on the pitch, he never built a career in Primeira Liga, the top division of Portuguese football. A right-back, he played only two games in the top flight, plying his trade between the second and third divisions, representing Trofense, Rio Ave, Braga B, S.C. Salgueiros and Odivelas. He ended his career at Estoril, amassing 105 appearances from 2005 to 2011. (Playing honours – none). 20 20 20 20 20 20 17. Rafael Benitez (Newcastle United) – Injuries blocked Benitez from becoming renowned for his footballing ability. A midfielder, the Newcastle manager earned a place in the Real Madrid C team in 1978 before making the step up to Real Madrid Castilla, Los Blancos’ reserve team, in 1979. His career was firmly heading in the right direction when he was called up to Spain’s Under-19 side that same year, but a serious injury while on international duty halted his progress. He later joined lower-league sides Parla and Linares, but in 1986 he was forced to retire due to injury problems. (Playing honours – Tercera División: 1981/82). 20 8. Mauricio Pochettino (Tottenham Hotspur) – The impressive Tottenham manager started his career with Newell’s Old Boys in his homeland, Argentina, playing 153 times before linking up with La Liga side Espanyol in 1994. It was there that he made his name as a strong centre-back, winning the Copa del Rey in 2000, and a year later completed a move to Paris Saint-Germain. A return to Espanyol beckoned after four years in France – including a spell with Bordeaux – and he retired there in 2006. Pochettino also won 20 caps for Argentina, playing all three group games in the 2002 World Cup. (Playing honours – Argentine Primera Division: 1990/91; Clausura: 1992; Copa del Rey: 1999/2000, 2005/06). 20 7. Mauricio Pellegrino (Southampton) – When Southampton announced Pellegrino as their new manager, there were plenty who didn’t know too much about the Argentine, but he’s got quite the playing career on his CV. His career began in his homeland with Velez Sarsfield in 1990, where he played for eight seasons before moving to Barcelona on loan to help the club win the La Liga title in 1998/99. Two more Spanish titles and a UEFA Cup followed with a switch to Valencia, and he played in two Champions League finals. Short spells with Liverpool (2005) and Alaves (2005 to 2006) came prior to his move into coaching. Despite his club success, Pellegrino won just three Argentina caps. (Playing honours – Argentine Primera División: 1993 Clausura, 1995 Apertura, 1996 Clausura, 1998 Clausura; Copa Libertadores: 1994; Intercontinental Cup: 1994; Supercopa Sudamericana: 1996; Copa Interamericana: 1994; Recopa Sudamericana: 1997; La Liga: 1998/99 (Barcelona) 2001/02, 2003/04 (Valencia); UEFA Cup: 2003/04). 1. Ronald Koeman (Everton) – One of the best ball-playing defenders of all-time, the Dutchman enjoyed a glorious 17-year playing career, winning a host of trophies across Europe. Starting his career with Groningen, Koeman went on to win the Eredivisie with Ajax and PSV Eindhoven, as well as the European Cup with the latter. He then moved to Barcelona, and as part of Johan Cruyff’s ‘Dream Team’ won four successive La Liga titles, and scored the winning goal in Barca’s first ever European Cup win. He scored 14 goals in 78 games for the Netherlands, too, playing the full game as Rinus Michels’s men beat the Soviet Union in the Euro 1988 final. Few footballers possessed his passing range. (Playing honours – Eredivisie: 1984/85, 1986/87, 1987/88, 1988/89; KNVB Cup: 1985/86, 1987/88, 1988/89; European Cup: 1987/88, 1991/92; La Liga: 1990/91, 1991/92, 1992/93, 1993/94; UEFA Super Cup: 1992; Copa del Rey: 1989/90; Supercopa de Espana: 1991, 1992, 1994; UEFA European Championship: 1988).last_img read more

Continue reading

Ten-man Burnley lose to Olympiakos in Europa League play-off first leg

first_img Best clips, calls and talkSPORT moments of 2019, feat Hearn, McCoist and more MONEY 1 Forbes list reveals how much Mayweather, Ronaldo and Messi earned this decade And they also encountered a pretty hostile atmosphere at the 32,000-capacity Georgios Karaiskakis Stadium, which had around 1,000 of their fans in attendance.Sean Dyche’s men looked comfortable enough in the early stages as they made a lively start, winning a couple of corners.But they fell behind in the 19th minute when play was allowed to continue after a collision between Jeff Hendrick and Lazaros Christodoulopoulos and Phil Bardsley brought down Daniel Podence just outside the visitors’ box, with Fortounis curling the resulting fee-kick past Heaton in fine style.Gibson and Wood then sent efforts off target, before Slovenian referee Slavko Vincic waved away Olympiakos penalty appeals after Podence went down in the box under the attention of Kevin Long. Every current Premier League club’s best kit from the past decade smart causal Summer signing Joe Hart was left on the bench for Burnley England’s most successful clubs of the past decade, according to trophies won Nerves of steel from @officialcwood to level from the spot pic.twitter.com/7kVaovun0E— Burnley FC (@BurnleyOfficial) August 23, 2018And Fortounis then converted a penalty of his own on the hour mark to extend the Olympiakos’ advantage.That spot-kick had been given for a handball by Gibson, who was shown a second yellow card – having also been booked for giving away the free-kick that led to Bouchalakis’ goal.Burnley – wearing black armbands as a mark of respect for club great Jimmy McIlroy, who died on Monday aged 86 – had a starting line-up featuring six changes from Sunday’s 3-1 Premier League home loss to Watford.Goalkeeper Tom Heaton was among those coming into the first XI, making his first appearance in just under a year, as Joe Hart dropped to the bench.The Clarets were playing on a poor surface that they had not had a training session on ahead of the game, using Panionios’ ground instead after Olympiakos were granted special dispensation by UEFA. gameday possible standings Tottenham v Brighton LIVE: talkSPORT commentary and team news for Boxing Day opener Tottenham predicted XI to face Brighton with Mourinho expected to make big changes Latest Football News How the Premier League table could change after the Boxing Day fixtures impact ALTERED silverware Ben Gibson’s second-half dismissal compounded a bad night for Burnley in Europe after they went down to a 3-1 defeat at Olympiakos in their Europa League play-off first leg.Chris Wood’s first-half penalty initially cancelled out Kostas Fortounis’ free-kick but the hosts turned the screw when Andreas Bouchalakis regained the Greek side’s lead. Every Championship club’s best signing of the decade, including Taarabt and Dack highlights Moments later, Vincic did point to the spot, in the other box, with Wood having gone to ground when challenged by Mohamed Camara. The former Leeds striker kept his cool to convert from 12 yards and Burnley were level.There were more calls from the hosts for a penalty just before the interval as Fortounis’ cross struck Stephen Ward’s arm, but it was not given and Christodoulopoulos was booked for his protests to Vincic’s assistant.Vincic produced another yellow card shortly after the interval after Gibson gave away a free-kick with a foul on Fortounis, whose subsequent delivery was headed in by former Nottingham Forest midfielder Bouchalakis.And a nightmare few minutes for Gibson then continued as Vincic judged he was guilty of a handball in the box and booked him again. Gibson trudged off and Fortounis slotted the penalty past Heaton.Dyche responded to the dismissal by bringing on James Tarkowski for Wood, before Miguel Angel Guerrero shot just wide of Heaton’s goal.Sam Vokes, who had come on for Johnann Berg Gudmudsson, thought he had netted another away goal in the closing stages but after he bundled the ball over the line the flag was raised for offside.The second leg at Turf Moor is next Thursday.last_img read more

Continue reading

Drake releasing two new songs to celebrate Raptors’ victory over the Warriors

first_imgGiven the fervent and sometimes aggravating way Drake rooted for the Toronto Raptors to become NBA champions, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the rapper and Canadian native found a splashy way to celebrate their victory over the Golden State Warriors.After the Raptors defeated the Warriors 114-110 in the NBA Finals on Thursday night, superfan Drake took to Instagram to announce he would release two new songs Friday.The tracks appear to be called “Omertà” and “Money in the Grave,” the …last_img read more

Continue reading

Klay Thompson’s East Bay Times-themed shoes sell out quickly

first_imgKlay Thompson’s new, limited-edition East Bay Times/newspaper-themed shoes sold out fast Sunday, and are quickly being offered on the secondary market for $2,500, or about $2,300 more than they originally cost.With only 150 pairs of Thompson’s KT4 newspaper-inspired available, about 200 people lined up at the Oaklandish store on Broadway in Oakland Sunday, waiting hours before the launch of the special deal between Thompson, his shoe sponsor Anta and the Bay Area News Group.The shoes were …last_img read more

Continue reading

Celebrate Whole Grains Month with sweet corn and other favorites

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest September is Whole Grains Month. Paul asked me why is it Whole Grains Month? I told him it is because the Whole Grains Council wants to promote whole grains. He says it can’t be as important as Dairy Month. It is just as important. However, in today’s crazy food label world it just adds to the confusing food label lingo. Who knows what a whole grain is and how is it different than whole wheat? What does enriched mean? And the list goes on…The Whole Grains Council states that “Whole grains or foods made from them contain all the essential parts and naturally-occurring nutrients of the entire grain seed. If the grain has been processed (e.g., cracked, crushed, rolled, extruded, and/or cooked), the food product should deliver approximately the same rich balance of nutrients that are found in the original grain seed.” Basically that means that whole grains are whole grains but even when a grain has been processed and all the parts are still in a product, it can claim it’s a whole grain. Some common whole grains include Amaranth, Barley, Buckwheat, Corn, including whole cornmeal and popcorn, millet, oats, including oatmeal, quinoa, rice, both brown rice and colored rice, Rye, Teff, Triticale, Wheat, including varieties such as spelt, emmer, farro, einkorn, Kamut, durum and forms such as bulgur, cracked wheat and wheatberries and wild rice. To answer the whole wheat question, think of it like this: whole wheat is to whole grains like green beans are to vegetables.Recently during a wellness talk to Union County employees about whole grains, another great question came up. What is enriched? Enriched has nothing to do with whole grains and is a term from the FDA that states a product has added at least 10% more of the daily value of a single nutrient — typically vitamins and/or minerals — than the product had to begin with. For example enriched flour has been enriched with folic acid, iron and other minerals.It takes time to learn all the label lingo and to be able to decipher the truth. But why must we include whole grains you ask? The Mayo Clinic states: “Whole grains are better sources of fiber and other important nutrients, such as selenium, potassium and magnesium. So whenever you can, choose whole grains over refined grains.” Basically the more processed grains you eat, the more the nutrients have been greatly reduced.Did you notice corn in the whole grain list? How many kernels does the “average” ear of corn have? 800 arranged in 16 rows. What did one ear of corn say to the other ear of corn? Don’t look now but I think someone is stalking us. Corny jokes aside, corn is probably the all-time favorite whole grain in the Detwiler family. We love corn in most any form — sweet corn and popcorn being our favorite. Sweet corn is great side dish and can be included in a healthy diet. One medium ear has 90 calories, 18 grams of carbs, four grams of protein, 2.5 grams of fat, and two grams of fiber. Corn is the best dietary source of two antioxidants called Lutein and zeaxanthin. These yellow pigments play a significant role in good eye health. Everyone seems to have their favorite way to cook it boil it, grill it and recently I even tried microwaving it. It’s all yummy. The best tips are to eat it the day it’s picked. If you can’t, chilling it helps keep the sugar content up. We started growing popcorn just to support Paul’s popcorn habit, which exceeds three gallons a week! Ruby Red is his favorite, which is a smaller kernel with less hull packed with more flavor. Popcorn is a great snack if you can skip all the butter on it. Three cups has only 90 calories, one gram of fat, 18 grams of carbs, and three grams of fiber.Celebrate whole grains month by including some of these great tasting “whole grain” corn recipes.Two-corn polenta with tomatoes, basil and cheese www.cookinglight.com 2 teaspoons olive oil 2 cups chopped onion (2 medium) 4 cups fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth 2 cups fresh corn kernels (about 2 ears) 2 garlic cloves, chopped 1 cup instant dry polenta 1/2 cup (2 ounces) grated fresh Parmesan cheese 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 cup chopped tomato 1/2 cup chopped fresh basil  Heat oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add onion to pan; cook 8 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in broth, corn, and garlic; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 5 minutes. Slowly add polenta, stirring with a whisk until polenta is thick (about 5 minutes). Add cheese, stirring to melt. Stir in salt and pepper. Remove from heat; sprinkle with tomato and basil. Serve immediately. Yield: 7-1 cup servings CALORIES 194 (20% from fat); FAT 4.3g (sat 1.5g,mono 1.8g,poly 0.4g); IRON 1.1mg; CHOLESTEROL 6mg; CALCIUM 134mg; CARBOHYDRATE 31.6g; SODIUM 457mg; PROTEIN 8.9g; FIBER 4.6g Quinoa toss with chickpeas and herbs www.bhg.com  1 c quinoa2 c chicken or vegetable broth2 ears of fresh corn or 1 c frozen, thawed15 oz. can chickpea½ c crumbled feta cheese1/4 cup finely chopped sweet onion3 Tbsp. snipped fresh basil2 Tbsp. snipped fresh Italian (flat-leaf) parsley¼ cup olive oil2 Tbsp. lemon juice1 cup diced, cooked beetsRomaine leaves  Rinse quinoa in a fine mesh sieve under cold running water; drain. In saucepan bring broth to boiling. Add quinoa. Return to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 15 minutes or until broth is absorbed. Remove from heat; set aside to cool.Cut corn from cobs. Rinse and drain chickpeas. In bowl combine quinoa, corn, chickpeas, cheese, onion, and herbs. For dressing, in bowl whisk together oil, lemon juice, 1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper. Add to quinoa mixture; toss to coat.Cover and let stand at least 1 hour, or cover and refrigerate up to 24 hours. Bring to room temperature before serving. Stir in beets just before serving. Serve in bowls lined with romaine leaves. Makes 8 (1-cup) servings. Nutrition Facts: Per serving: 270 cal, 11 g fat, 7 mg chol., 665 mg sodium, 37 g carb, 6 g fiber, 9 g pro Fresh corn salad  8 ears fresh corn (husked and cleaned)¼ cup olive oil¼ cup cider vinegar1 ½ tsp lemon juice¼ cup fresh parsley (chopped)1 tsp sugar¼ tsp salt1 Tbsp. chopped fresh basil1-2 cloves garlic1/8 tsp cayenne pepper2 large tomatoes (seeded and chopped)1/3 cup green pepper (chopped)¼ cup sweet red pepper (chopped)½ cup onion (chopped)  Cook corn for 5-7 minutes or until tender. Drain, cool and set aside. Mix oil, vinegar, lemon juice, parsley, sugar, basil, garlic, salt and pepper. Cut cooled corn off the cob (4 cups). Add corn, tomatoes, onion and peppers to the oil mixture. Cover and chill overnight.Makes 8-1 cup servings. Nutrition information per serving: 162 calories; 8g fat; 20g carbohydrate; 3g protein; 76mg sodium; 3g fiber Corn and bacon dip from Taste of Home   1 package (8 ounces) lite cream cheese, soft1 cup (8 ounces) fat free sour cream1/4 cup lite mayonnaise2 garlic cloves, minced1/4 teaspoon hot pepper sauce1 can (15-1/4 ounces) whole kernel corn, drainedOr 2 cups fresh cut cooked corn6 bacon strips, cooked and crumbledAssorted raw vegetables and/or crackers  In a bowl, combine the first five ingredients. Stir in corn and bacon. Cover and refrigerate for several hours. Serve with vegetables and/or crackers.Yield: 3 cups. 24-2Tbsp Servings: Snickerdoodle popcorn2/3 to ¾ c popcorn kernels4 Tbsp. butter ¼ c powdered sugar2 Tbsp. sugar 2 tsp. cinnamon Mix sugars & cinnamon. Pop popcorn. Melt butter and drizzle over popcorn. Stir to coat evenly. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar mixture. Enjoy! Easy caramel popcorn1/2 c popcorn kernels 1c brown sugar 1/2 c butter                  ½-1 tsp salt1/4 c light corn syrup ½ tsp baking soda Pop popcorn kernels & pour into a large bowl. Melt butter, brown sugar, corn syrup and ½ tsp salt together over medium heat. Bring to boil. Boil for 4 minutes without stirring. Stir in baking soda & let foam. Pour caramel mixture over popcorn and stir to coat completely. Pour on wax or parchment. Sprinkle remaining salt on top for a salty caramel taste. Bake for 30 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes.last_img read more

Continue reading

Beyond The Glitz

first_imgTo an outsider, or to a rational student of media and democracy, this is a land of wonders. The world is burning. The United States is immersed in two wars. Russia is redrawing the map of the region. Pakistan’s President Pervez Musharraf has resigned with no reliable replacement in sight. Healthcare is going to control the economic woes in the coming years, at least for the salaried class. The infrastructure of the country is collapsing. The educational system is a sham, easily overtaken by several others in the world. Globalization is making all the achievements of the country look pale. The world is not flat at all. And, everyone is waiting for the Olympics to be over before the “public” can take seriously the matter of choosing the next President.There is only so much excitement television stations can hold. And for the public, it is easy to ignore the real pain and watch the athletes and their overrated activities called sports. The candidates do not have the courage to re-shape the public debate by simply jumping into it. They take carefully publicized vacations and hold off on their announcements of their vice presidential nominee. There is no room in our minds for two events, the great feats of Michael Phelps and a VP candidate together. It has to be one at a time. It is an astonishingly dismal achievement of this age that we have given in to the dictates of the world of showbiz. Television dictates how we think and indeed when we do that.It is not a surprise that the schedule of events for the Olympics was commandeered by NBC, which was broadcasting them according to its own demands of revenue, ratings and audiences.It should not be a surprise that the Conventions are also organized around the prime time schedules of networks. The great arrangements on the totem pole of importance are made according to who gets a chance to speak when. There are hundreds of lesser known speakers before prime time begins and a dozen or so score the high points for later. Prime time makes our political leaders. We know them because they get a chance to speak during this precious time. It is time to find substance behind the glitz and control. Related Itemslast_img read more

Continue reading