Jonathan Groff, Frankie Alvarez & Murray Bartlett Reveal What They’re Looking For On New HBO Series

first_img Jonathan Groff Star Files Broadway fave Jonathan Groff will soon reach a whole new level of stardom when the new HBO series Looking debuts on January 19. Much more than a gay-themed Girls or Sex and the City retread, Looking follows a trio of friends—Groff as awkward but adorable Patrick, Murray Bartlett as about-to-turn-forty Dom and Frankie J. Alvarez as struggling artist Augustín—grappling with gay life in San Francisco. So, why should we care about these guys? Luckily, HBO released a video of the three stars chatting about why everyone—not just gay men—will relate to these characters. Check out the clip below and meet your new favorite TV buds.center_img View Commentslast_img read more

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Fat fuel

first_imgBy Sharon DowdyUniversity of GeorgiaWhen the cost of diesel skyrocketed to more than $4 a gallon, Travis Sweat fought back. Using knowledge from the Internet and recycled oil from fast-food restaurants, he made his own fuel for $1 a gallon.“I’d heard of other people (making their own fuel), and I knew there were several different ways to do it,” said Sweat, who has run his 1997 Ford F250 on a blend of waste vegetable oil for seven months. Free oil is the baseSweat, a game warden from Griffin, Ga., gets free used liquid fryer oil from a friend who owns a restaurant. He uses vegetable, peanut and soybean oils. Hydrogenated oil can’t be used. Sweat filters the oil twice and puts it through a water separator. It takes 30 minutes to process a 55-gallon batch of fuel. “Basically, I just pour a few things in a drum, filter it and I’m ready to go,” he said. Sweat’s recipe is 80 percent oil, 15 percent to 20 percent diesel and 5 percent gasoline.His fuel isn’t biodiesel, which is “harder to make and requires more chemicals,” he said. WVO fuel blend can only run in certain types of engines and injection systems, Sweat said. It won’t work at all in newer trucks.A smooth rideWhen Sweat switches his truck from diesel to his WVO blend, he likes the difference. “The engine gets really quiet and smooth, and it runs a lot better,” he said. “There used to be a rough idle at stop signs, and now there isn’t.”Sweat’s wife, Stephanie, has faith in her husband’s homemade fuel. She must. She drives the truck to work and to run errands around town. Sweat admits, though, his greatest concern is engine failure. “It was a little scary at first,” he said. “If you blow a diesel engine, you’re looking at $5,000 to $10,000 to replace it.”A matter of timeSweat should be careful, said Dan Geller, a researcher with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. From an engineering standpoint, the fuels he’s burning won’t work for long.“The engineer in me says this is a bad idea because of the potential for disaster,” Geller said. “But the practical, environmental side of me says it’s great. It’s just not for the faint of heart.”With WVO, not all the oil combusts, he said, and over time carbon builds up in the engine and will damage it.The problem is chemical not physical. “The molecules in the oil are big molecules, relatively speaking, compared to diesel molecules,” Geller said. “You can thin it all you want, but you aren’t changing the molecule structure.” Do you feel lucky?Geller has met hundreds of people who have used WVO in their vehicles for up to five years with no problems. He also knows some who have had unsuccessful ventures with WVO and other homemade fuel recipes.“If you’re mindful of what you’re doing and are very mechanically inclined, go ahead and try it,” he said. “I wouldn’t personally do it.”Geller has conducted numerous experiments with biodiesel, he said, and would use it in his own vehicle. “With biodiesel, you go to the pump, you put it in and you don’t have to think about it.”WVO blended fuel is better for the environment, runs much cleaner than petroleum, is a renewable resource and relieves some of our dependence on foreign oil, he said. “But you can get all the same advantages from biodiesel, and you don’t have to make it yourself.”last_img read more

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On the blogs: APS coal strategy bad news for customers

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Energy and Policy Institute:Arizona’s largest electric utility, Arizona Public Service, is back in front of regulators asking for its second rate increase in just over a year. In early September, Arizona Corporation Commissioners, the elected officials that regulates power companies in the state, heard testimony from APS and intervenors in a case regarding recently installed pollution control equipment at the Four Corners coal power plant. APS’s share of the total bill for the equipment and installation came to $400 million; the utility wants to have its customers pick up the tab. If the latest increase is approved, the plant will provide APS investors with not only a repayment of that expenditure, but also a tidy profit, while customers continue to foot the bill for an investment that environmentalists and consumer advocates warned would be unwise years ago. Those warnings have come true.At a time when utilities around the country were beginning to ditch their coal plants for economic reasons, APS wanted to invest. The utility convinced regulators to allow it to purchase a California utility’s interest in a coal plant. It was a decision that David Schlissel, now the director of resource planning analysis for the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA), called “the only instance that I can recall where a utility is seeking to replace retired coal capacity with another aging coal facility.” Schlissel was testifying for the Sierra Club at the time, and is planning to release a report later this year about the power plant and its impact on customers’ bills.Six years later, it has become clear that APS ignored the warnings about its uneconomic investment. The company made the decision knowing full well that investors would be able receive a profit. “Adding to rate base is a way for utilities to increase their profits. Buying the additional interest in Four Corners made no sense. It was uneconomical for ratepayers. Adding the pollution control equipment is also uneconomical,” Schlissel said in an interview with the Energy and Policy Institute (EPI). “Four Corners has had no benefit. It’s a very expensive plant that is just going to become more expensive.”The purchase of Southern California Edison’s interest in the Four Corners plant was a result of lawmakers in California enacting legislation to limit global warming pollution from their electricity sector. After the enactment of Senate Bill 1368, California regulators at the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) ruled that Southern California Edison could not recover any money spent on the Four Corners plant from its customers if the investments would increase the life of the plant. The utility knew that it needed to invest in equipment at the plant to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions. Breathing air with high concentration of nitrogen oxide can lead to lung problems and can contribute to the development of asthma and other respiratory infections.APS was carefully watching the proceeding in California, and since Arizona didn’t have a global warming law, APS could take more ownership in the coal plant and force its customers to pay for any investments at the plant. That would generate a profit for APS investors. Indeed, only months after Southern California Edison agreed to sell to APS, in February 2011 an executive for the Arizona utility told a Goldman Sachs analyst that if the acquisition closes in the fourth quarter of 2012, then investors would get recovery in 2013; and, “it would be a matter of getting into service the following year or sometime after that” to get the profit for the pollution control equipment. James Hatfield, Chief Financial Officer for APS, estimated that return to arrive sometime after 2013.Immediately after the California PUC ruling, on November 8, 2010, Southern California Edison agreed to sell all of its 48% interest in units 4 and 5 of the Four Corners power plant to APS. The decision would make APS the majority owner of the two coal units that had opened in 1969 and 1970. Two weeks later, on November 22, APS opened a docket with the ACC to win their approval of the purchase. The docket lasted a year and a half, giving intervenors ample time to raise red flags about the project.More: Replacing coal with more coal: how Arizona Public Service’s Four Corners coal plant hurt customers, but earned investors profits On the blogs: APS coal strategy bad news for customerslast_img read more

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How to survive Google’s Mobilegeddon

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr If your website design is not optimized to be viewed on a mobile phone, it should be. A comScore report says smartphones and tablets combined now account for 60% of all online traffic. And now, Google’s found a way to reinforce the message that mobile-friendly matters.This past February, Google released a statement warning business owners of an impending change that would forever alter the game of mobile SEO – a new page-ranking algorithm that actually penalizes non mobile-friendly websites. It has since been nicknamed “mobilegeddon,” referring to how “apocalyptic” this change is for millions of websites. So what does this mean for your credit union?To put it simply, Google intends on rewarding websites with mobile-friendly designs by providing positive search engine rankings. It also means that websites who already have high search engine rankings could lose their position, and ultimately thousands of site visits per day, if they’re not optimized for mobile devices. But how do you know whether or not your website is “mobile friendly?”Conveniently enough, there’s a Mobile-Friendly Test tool to test the mobile readiness of your website. According to a report conducted by BBC, sections of several large name websites have failed this test including Wikipedia, the European Union and BBC itself – meaning your credit union is not immune. continue reading »last_img read more

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America’s credit unions: Dreams thrive here

first_img 42SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Dennis Zuehlke Dennis is Compliance Manager for Ascensus. Mr. Zuehlke provides clients with technical support on tax-advantaged accounts (including individual retirement accounts, health savings accounts, simplified employee pension plans, and Coverdell education … Web: www.ascensus.com Details As credit unions celebrate International Credit Union Day on October 19, 2017, this year’s theme, “Dreams Thrive Here,” speaks volumes to the relationships that credit unions have with their members. For decades, credit unions have helped their members save for their first car and their first home, turning dreams into reality.Saving money is not easy, but credit unions help their members achieve their savings goals with fair-priced loans and tools, such as payroll deduction, to make saving easy. As a trusted financial partner, credit unions have an opportunity to help their members save for three of the most important things in life: retirement, college, and healthcare. And members need help saving for all three.Consider the following statistics.Twenty-eight percent of non-retired adults indicate that they currently have no retirement savings or pension whatsoever, according to the Report of the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2016, published by the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. The average amount parents have saved for college is $16,380, according to How America Saves for College 2016, Sallie Mae’s national study of parents with children under age 18. This amount would not even cover the average cost of one full year of tuition, fees, and room and board at a public four-year in-state school.More than half of the consumers who said that they were contacted about debt in collection noted that it was related to a medical debt, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Survey of Consumer Views on Debt.Over the years, Congress has created a host of tax-advantaged savings plans, which includes IRAs, simplified employee pension (SEP) plans, savings incentive match plan for employees of small employers (SIMPLE) IRA plans, Coverdell education savings accounts (ESA), and health savings accounts (HSAs), to encourage saving for retirement, college, and healthcare. These plans provide members with generous tax savings—especially HSAs—which provide for both tax deductible contributions and tax-free withdrawals. Many credit unions offer some or all of these savings plans to their members, yet many members who need help to achieve their financial goals do not take advantage of these plans and their benefits. As credit unions celebrate International Credit Union Day, they may reflect on how they help their members achieve financial goals. The following are tips to help members save for retirement, college, and healthcare.Educate members about the many tax-advantaged savings plans—IRAs, SEP plans, SIMPLE IRA plans, ESAs, and HSAs—and how these plans can help them save for retirement, college, and retirement. Small business owners often cannot afford to offer a retirement plan to their employees but they may not be aware of the tax benefits of a SEP plan or SIMPLE IRA. Grandparents who want to help their grandchildren may not be aware of the ESA and its benefits. HSA owners who receive employer contributions may not be aware of the added tax benefits that they would receive by also making contributions to their HSA. As a trusted source of financial information, credit unions can provide members with the information they need to reach their savings goals. Promote low-cost credit union IRAs, ESAs, and HSAs. Studies consistently show that credit unions charge lower fees and pay higher deposit rates than their competitors. Many credit unions offer IRAs, ESAs, and HSAs with no annual fees and low- or no-minimum balance requirements. And, if fees are assessed, they are usually lower than the fees charged by competitors. This makes it easy for members to start saving for retirement, college, or healthcare, by setting aside modest amounts on a regular basis without the worry of high fees eroding their savings.Offer payroll deduction or automatic transfers to make saving easy. More important than saving for retirement, college, or healthcare is saving for these events on a regular basis, but members need help to keep their commitment. Encouraging payroll deduction as a way to save for retirement, college, or healthcare makes it easy and ensures that members commit to achieving their saving goals.For decades, credit unions have helped members achieve their financial dreams. As the credit union movement celebrates International Credit Union Day, credit unions have an opportunity to help members save for three of the most important things in life: retirement, college, and healthcare. Dreams thrive here because members know that they can count on their credit unions to help them achieve their financial goals. Ascensus has a long history of serving the credit union market. We wish all of our credit union clients a happy International Credit Union Day.last_img read more

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Don’t wait for the SAFE Banking Act

first_imgWhile marijuana has been legalized to varying degrees in 33 states (as well as the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico), many financial institutions remain hesitant to offer banking services to marijuana-related businesses (MRBs) because marijuana remains federally illegal.To address this FinCEN issued guidance in 2014 (BSA Expectations Regarding Marijuana-Related Businesses) that “clarifies how financial institutions can provide services to marijuana-related businesses consistent with their BSA obligations,” so as to “enhance the availability of financial services for, and the financial transparency of, marijuana-related businesses.” However, FinCEN stops short of officially sanctioning marijuana banking, so many banks and credit unions continue to withhold basic depository and lending services from MRBs.In response, the House of Representatives passed the Secure And Fair Enforcement Banking Act of 2019 (SAFE Banking Act) at the end of last year. The SAFE Banking Act’s intention is to “increase public safety by ensuring access to financial services to cannabis-related legitimate businesses and service providers and reducing the amount of cash at such businesses.” If signed into law it would provide that safe harbor missing from FinCEN’s guidance, thereby encouraging banks and credit unions to open their doors to MRBs. Because the SAFE Banking Act enjoyed strong bipartisan support in the House, many financial institutions have adopted a “wait and see” approach to banking MRBs: “We want to bank marijuana but we’re going to wait until the SAFE Banking Act passes.”While this seems prudent, I encourage you to reconsider because right now credit unions have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to get ahead of the big national banks against which they so often struggle to compete in all other areas.None of these banks currently offer services to MRBs, but I don’t think it’s because they’re afraid that they would be unable to build a compliant marijuana banking program based on FinCEN’s guidance. Consider that the legal marijuana industry generated upwards of $13 billion dollars in medical and adult-use (recreational) sales in 2019 according to Marijuana Business Daily. The impact that access to that $13 billion market would have on a credit union is very different than it would be for a big national bank. To put this into perspective, according to the NCUA the Q1 2020 total assets held by all federally-insured credit unions combined were $1.64 trillion while JP Morgan alone boasted Q1 2020 total assets of approximately $2.7 trillion per their most recent FFIEC call report. For a national bank there’s not necessarily a compelling reason to assume any additional risk exposure by offering services to MRBs because the risk isn’t worth the reward. They’re content to sit back and wait.However, I think it’s a safe bet to assume that these banks have programs ready to come off the shelf as soon as the SAFE Banking Act is passed. With their brand recognition, large existing customer base, and geographic reach they’ll be able to dominate the market on day one. So while the big banks sit and wait, credit unions have a chance to get ahead of them by bringing marijuana banking programs to the market. But how can a credit union do this confidently if they feel that the FinCEN guidance alone isn’t enough?Before this coronavirus pandemic deeply wounded the economy, credit unions were often reluctant to engage with the marijuana industry because there was a fear that MRBs weren’t stable businesses because they could presumably be shut down by the federal government at any time. However, throughout this crisis MRBs have been surprisingly resilient, being officially recognized by state governments as essential businesses that were allowed to stay open while so many other small businesses were forced to close and furlough employees. We’re learning that what many had hoped would be purely temporary closures of those small businesses might well become permanent. In June, MarketWatch drew on Yelp data to estimate that in Los Angeles alone over 11,000 small businesses like restaurants, bars, and shops might never open their doors again. Recent experience shows that MRBs will not only survive, but in some cases thrive, contributing tax revenue, providing employment opportunities, and supporting the work of service providers like plumbers, accountants, and lawyers.At the same time, states are losing significant tax revenues engaged in the fight against coronavirus at a time when they’re rapidly losing the businesses that would otherwise contribute to replenishing those coffers. However, having designated MRBs as essential they are keenly aware that the businesses have continued to contribute their share throughout this crisis. This has led to a commonly-held assumption that states are going to take advantage of this opportunity and expand their marijuana programs to bring in the one of the few new potential sources of tax revenue. Take for example, John Fetterman, the Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania, who was recently quoted as saying “There’s already a thriving marijuana market in Pa. Why not make it legal, why not make it safe and why not make it taxable to help Pa. get back on its feet?” Marijuana businesses will be essential to our economic recovery.This all comes along at a time that American attitudes towards marijiuana are overwhelmingly positive and politicians that are otherwise bitter partisan rivals on seemingly every other major policy point are ready to work together to expand, or at the very least protect, legal marijuana programs. A 2019 study by the Pew Research Center found that two thirds of Americans were in favor of the legalization of marijuana, and this is the case (to varying degrees) regardless of political party, race, sex, or educational experience. To put it plainly, marijuana is no longer terribly controversial.There are a lot of reasons to bank the marijuana industry, all of which exist without the SAFE Banking Act. I absolutely understand that it would be ideal for the federal government to offer legal protections for financial institutions that want to bank the cannabis industry, but any credit union that waits until then will have to go toe-to-toe with the big national banks that are going to be ready to hit the ground running. If you want to bank marijuana you cannot afford to wait. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Paul Dunford Paul is a co-founder & director of program development. Paul oversees the development and management of compliance programs for Green Check’s clients, with a focus on state-level compliance as … Web: https://www.greencheckverified.com Detailslast_img read more

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Ever-changing scenery is the top selling point at opulent abode

first_imgStretch out across three levels of living, and that’s just what’s on the inside.“It’s 30 minutes from the city, it’s 30 minutes from the Gold Coast, for me it was 5 minutes from the kids’ school (John Paul College) and everything surrounding it is just so nice and peaceful.” The understated street entrance ensures privacy.She said an electric gate meant the house was very private, but still so close to everything you need. FOR SALE: 427 Springwood Rd, Daisy Hill will go to auction on Saturday, May 12 at 2pm.AFTER 11 years of making memories, Con and Linda Athans have made the “heartbreaking” decision to sell their home at auction this month.Mrs Athans said now their two children were at university it was time to move.“My two little children are now teenagers and they’re going to university down the Gold Coast, so we’re moving closer to the Gold Coast,” she said.She said when they first purchased 427 Springwood Rd, Daisy Hill they were attracted to its individuality and amazing views, despite its need for renovation. The current owners fell in love with the amazing view.“It was pretty run down, so we renovated the whole house,” she said.“We put in a big entertainment centre, with a flat roof, so we have an entertaining venue up there with a barbecue and shade sail.“We put in a theatre room, we’ve added a three-car lock-up garage, a tennis court and totally renovated the swimming pool.” There is a view from every room of the house.“You have a view from every window of the house.” Anyone for tennis?More from newsNew apartments released at idyllic retirement community Samford Grove Presented by Parks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus19 hours agoShe said her family’s time in the house had been “amazing”.“It’s just so safe and close to everything,” she said.“We could walk to the Daisy Hill forest, and ride bikes and the house is big enough to have lots of family and friends over.” This house is big enough to have “lots” of family and friends over.She said the thing she’d miss the most was the same thing appealing buyers – the view.“You wake up in the morning and you see hot air balloons and then at night you’ve got the beautiful lights, it’s just amazing.last_img read more

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Freshwater dream home’s long history in Cairns

first_img AGENT: Debbie North, Cairns Property Office Cairns, 0412 770 953 PRICE: Contact agent A CHANCE visit to a friend’s place more than 25 years ago set in motion a range events that would see Josie and Russell Beer settle in Freshwater.Siting high in Freshwater with sweeping views of the surrounding rural land, the home at 18A Duffy St has undergone a remarkable transformation over the past two decades.Originally in McLeod St, Cairns North, the house was moved in the early 1990s and underwent renovations with the addition of the large wraparound deck on the upper story.Which is when the Beers first saw the home. 18A Duffy Street, Freshwater, QLDAlong with knocking down a wall or two upstairs to create a more open and inviting ambience, they updated the kitchen, moved the original bathroom to make room for a study and created an ensuite and walk-in robe off the main bedroom.Downstairs, the home has been built-in to know include three bedrooms, bathroom, toilet, kitchenette and living room.Then nine years later more significant renovations were made, with the installation of a 12.5m lap pool, the backyard was levelled to create a play area, and the sizeable cellar was upgraded. 18A Duffy St, Freshwater when it was in McLeod St. It was moved from McLeod St in 1993 and over the last 25 years completely renovated it. “I love entertaining and having people around,” Mrs Beer said.“We have had parties for 120 people on the deck, we’ve had 21st birthdays, we have had a conference here.“I love having people around and sharing the space and the views – it seems to create a lovely area for conservations.”Selling agent Debbie North from Cairns Property Office said it is one of the “loveliest Queenslanders I’ve seen” .“What I love about the house are the incredible decks (about 95 sqm),” she said.“I love the traditional views across the cane fields with very few rooftops, the way they’ve preserved the character of the home, but you have wonderful modern things like a lap pool, ensuite and guest accommodation. “Also, despite the fact that it is so elevated that they’ve carefully created a decent sized usable area for kids to kick a ball around. “The placement of the kitchen where it services the deck is also great. “It’s so unusual for someone to be able to bring up a family from young children to adults in the same house and the house itself is absolutely timeless.”The Beers say it’s “reluctantly time to downsize” from what’s been their “dream home” and they’ve enjoyed it so much they’re “almost jealous of the next owners”. The polished and bright master bedroom.Despite the alterations, the original character of the home has been preserved. More from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms2 days agoTen auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns2 days ago“I think it is a real welcoming home, it creates a certain atmosphere when you have people around,” Mrs Beer observed.Surrounded by greenery, the home oozes a sense of privacy in a natural environment, while the magnificent rural view from the deck remains a feature of the home.“I think people get quite surprised when they walk through the front door, they go ‘Oh wow’ as they see the view,” Mrs Beer said.“You get the brown fields (of cane) at times, and then just before they are harvesting, the cane arrows and it gets this silvery look; it is like a sea in the way it changes all the time.”While the house with its four bedrooms and fenced lawn area, certainly suits a family, it is equally at home as an entertainer’s retreat.Serious cooking has been done from the kitchen with the direct servery windows servicing both indoor and outdoor dining. 18A Duffy St, Freshwater Siting high in Freshwater with sweeping views of the surrounding rural land, the home at 18A Duffy St has undergone a remarkable transformation over the past two decades.“We were going their place for dinner, we must have drove past and Russell said: ‘That looks good, I’m going to buy you that house one day,”, Mrs Beer recalled.“Our friends down the street said to us, ‘Those people will never sell, it’s been a labour of love’.”But, the house did go to auction just a few years later.“We came just to have a look, we didn’t bid or anything, but then a few weeks later the (real estate) agent contacted us to see if we were interested.“We couldn’t really afford to buy, but we decided to it.“We’d just had three cubic meters of mulch dumped at our home in Stratford, so we quickly got that cleaned up and sold and bought this place.”After taking ownership of the home the Beers made further modifications and renovations to suit their growing family. OPEN: Saturday 11am-noonlast_img read more

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Lundin picks TechnipFMC to deliver subsea equipment for North Sea project

first_imgOilfield services provider TechnipFMC has been awarded a substantial integrated engineering, procurement, construction and installation (iEPCITM) contract from Lundin Norway for the Luno II and Rolvsnes development, located in the North Sea at a water depth of 110 meters.Edvard Grieg platform. Source: LundinFor TechnipFMC, a substantial contract ranges between $250 million and $500 million.The company said on Wednesday that the contract covers the delivery and installation of subsea equipment including umbilicals, rigid flowlines, flexible jumpers, and subsea production systems.Arnaud Piéton, President Subsea at TechnipFMC, commented: “We are honored that Lundin Norway is embracing our innovative and comprehensive solutions, engaging with us early through iFEEDTM (integrated FEED) studies and realizing the full scope through an integrated EPCI, finding within TechnipFMC all the architects, the competencies, the equipment and services necessary to support this project.”Rolvsnes is located 3 km south of the Lundin Norway-operated Edvard Grieg platform on the Utsira High and has a gross estimated resource range of between 14 and 78 million barrels of oil equivalent (MMboe). It is worth mentioning that Lundin recently signed a deal to buy Lime Petroleum’s acreage in the Rolvsnes discovery and Goddo prospect for up to $45 million. The agreement will see Lundin increase its working interest in the Rolvsnes oil discovery in PL338C and in the recently awarded, nearby license PL338E1 from 50 to 80 percent and the Goddo prospect in PL815 from 40 to 60 percent.During 2019, Lundin plans to conduct an extended well test (EWT) at the Rolvsnes discovery via a subsea tie-back of the suspended appraisal well to the Edvard Grieg platform. It is expected that the extended well test will be sanctioned in the first quarter of 2019 and implementation will be in parallel with the Luno II development project. EWT first oil is planned for 2021.When it comes to Luno II, back in October 2018, Lundin entered into an agreement with Equinor to acquire Equinor’s entire 15 percent working interest in the license PL359, containing the Luno II oil discovery.Luno II is situated approximately 15 km south of the Edvard Grieg platform and has a gross resource range of between 40 and 100 million barrels of oil equivalent (MMboe). The development concept for Luno II is a subsea tie back to the Edvard Grieg platform and the objective is to submit a plan for development and sanction the project in early 2019. First oil is planned for early 2021.Offshore Energy Today Staff Subsea tie-back to Edvard Grieg last_img read more

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FPSO Alvheim Wired to Tampnet Subsea Fibre Optic Network

first_imgTampnet and Aker BP have finished the deployment of fibre optic cable to the Aker BP operated FPSO Alvheim. The FPSO is now connected to Tampnet’s subsea fibre optic network providing high redundancy and capacity, preparing Alvheim for the digital transition.Alvheim was already connected to Tampnet’s network, but this was via a lower capacity radio link from the Heimdal platform, which will be de-commissioned in 2021.Lead Engineer OCT at Aker BP, Ingve Guttorm Lode explains that the deployment will enable Alvheim to particpiate in the digital transition which is driven by the Aker BP EUREKA program for digitalization.“This is a very stable connection with high redundancy that will secure the best possible up-time for our operations. With the fibre optic cable’s massive capacity and low latency, we can now explore and test various applications to optimize production onboard”, Lode said.Tampnet’s Project Manager, Eivind Sangesland has been onboard the installation vessel for the past week to supervise the finishing touches of the installation. He points out that it is a special solution that Tampnet has delivered in this project in close cooperation with Aker BP and Subsea7 through their alliance.Sangesland explains that Tampnet and Aker BP started the project last year with divers from DSV Seven Falcon installing subsea connectors to provide Alvheim with an optimal interface for the fibre cable connection. This summer, a cable tail installed on Tampnet’s existing system between Heimdal and Mariner was picked up and a new 8 km long cable was laid to Alvheim where it was connected to a CEM (Cable End Module) and deployed to the seabed below Alvheim by the CLV Seaway Aimery.ROV pilots made the final connection to the Alvheim FPSO topside by connecting the previously installed subsea connectors with the CEM. From Alvheim to shore, the telecommunications signals will flow through approximately 450 km of high quality fibre optic cables before arriving at the Aker BP offices in Stavanger.In preparation for the offshore campaign, Tampnet’s NOC (Network Operations Centre) prepared the installation vessel with equipment to allow 4G LTE coverage while working out in the field. From the cable lay vessel Seaway Aimery, the 4G LTE coverage enabled the crew and project team onboard to communicate seamlessly through services demanding high bandwith such as video conferencing and screen sharing, and proved beneficial from an operational perspective in planning vessel and testing operations in proximity to the Alvheim FPSO.last_img read more

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