Another CFB Game Has Been Moved Due To Hurricane Florence

first_imgFootball's with South Carolina's logo on them.(Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)Hurricane Florence is set to hit the Carolinas in the coming days. The Category 4 storm looks like it could have a devastating impact.College football is a minor concern compared to the safety of those in the path of the storm. There have already been a number of games cancelled or rescheduled because of the impending hurricane.Another game time has just been changed. Old Dominion and Charlotte will play tomorrow instead of Saturday as previously scheduled.The game is set for 4 p.m. ET tomorrow at Jerry Richardson Stadium in Charlotte.The @Charlotte49ers football game with Old Dominion has been moved to Thursday at 4 p.m.https://t.co/szv4nwAfHf pic.twitter.com/VE9wHPylE2— Charlotte Football (@CharlotteFTBL) September 12, 2018ODU arrived in Charlotte on Tuesday, and as the two schools monitored the track of the storm, a decision was made to move the game up.“We appreciate everyone’s patience as we worked closely with Old Dominion Athletics Director Wood Selig and the conference office to make this decision,” said 49ers Director of Athletics Mike Hill. “Our primary goal in playing this game is to ensure the safety of student-athletes, coaches, staff and fans, and do so without creating an undue burden on our community and its emergency services. I also want to acknowledge the incredible cooperation of Coach Bobby Wilder, Coach Brad Lambert, emergency management officials and our campus partners in this difficult process.”Expect some more games to either be cancelled or postponed in the coming days.We will keep you posted on any changes.last_img read more

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Putting Health Care Back Into Hands of Nova Scotians Oped

first_img -30- In Nova Scotia, we are passionate about how our health care is delivered, accessed and managed. Yet, until recently, the fax machine has been the most common way for doctors to share information with each other, and patients still keep pieces of paper to keep track of important health information. In the meantime, text and email has become second nature in how we communicate with family and friends and online banking has become routine. It’s time to look at new ways of working in the health system too. We are ready to innovate and have taken that first step. We have introduced MyHealthNS, a secure online tool that connects doctors and patients. In doing that, we will increase access and convenience for patients, and put health care back into the hands of Nova Scotians. We are the first in Canada to offer this online tool provincewide. Right now, Nova Scotians can sign up at MyHealthNS.ca to keep track of personal health information like immunizations, blood pressure, medications and allergies. Feedback from patients is that this is an easy and convenient place to keep their health information organized, secure and accessible anytime from anywhere. Once you are registered online you will be ready for new features as they become available. The first major feature that will be available across Nova Scotia in early 2017 is eResults. This will allow family doctors registered with MyHealthNS to send their patients lab and diagnostic imaging results electronically. Patients who are also registered will be able to review the results online any time they need to, saving them a trip to the clinic to get the results. This will give people more control over their own health information and greater convenience overall. If the doctor feels that a test result is best shared in person, the clinic will call to ask the patient to come in for an appointment. The health information systems at the QEII Health Sciences Centre, the IWK Health Centre, and other hospitals in the Halifax, Eastern Shore and West Hants areas are now set up to provide electronic results on MyHealthNS. From young families with busy lives, to seniors who are now on the go more than ever, MyHealthNS is a convenient alternative to a doctor’s visit. It is simple and easy to use. Thirty-five doctors and more than 6000 patients took part in the three year evaluation. Patients say you don’t have to be tech savvy to manage your account. Doctors see the benefits as well. Those involved in the pilot said sharing test results electronically is valuable or extremely valuable to their patients. Ninety-eight per cent of the patients who took part said they wanted to keep receiving their results online. I am excited to see Nova Scotia taking the lead on e-health in this way, and I am pleased this will help Nova Scotians manage their own health care on their own time, and on their own terms. As we continue to roll the system out across the province, I encourage all Nova Scotians to register for this exciting new tool. You can do so by visiting http://myhealthns.calast_img read more

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Amsterdam pays alcoholics in beer to clean streets

first_imgThey’re no longer in the park, they drink less, they eat better and they have something to keep them busy during the day.“Heroin addicts can go to shooting galleries, so why shouldn’t we also give people beer?” she said.Project participants also say they are happy to be there, all taking part voluntarily.“It gives our lives some structure,” said one alcoholic who asked not to be named.“Lots of us haven’t had any structure in our lives for years, we just don’t know what it is, and so this is good for us,” said Frank.Opinions differPeople living in the neighbourhood also seem happy, greeting the cleaners as they work.“They’re doing something useful instead of hanging out in the park,” said a woman stood on her doorstep, declining to give her name.Opinions however differ about how much the work affects the group’s drinking habits.“When I get home, I’ve already had a busy day and I don’t necessarily want to drink,” said Vincent, 48, a former baker.“We also feel satisfied, a job well done, contributing to society despite the fact that we drink,” he said.“What’s also good is that the beer they give us is light, 5 per cent, not 11 per cent or 12 per cent like I used to drink,” he said.Frank is more sceptical. He said:Of course we drink in a more structured way, but I don’t think that we drink less. When we leave here, we go to the supermarket and transform the 10 euro we earned into beers…And when the group isn’t working, the old habits return.“When the supermarket opens at 8am, we’re the first there so we can get some drinks,” he said.- © AFP, 2013Dutch test new system to tackle traffic bans>Irish people are drinking 700 times more than we should> AT NINE O’CLOCK in the morning in a garden shed behind a house in Amsterdam, a handful of alcoholics are getting ready to clean the surrounding streets, beer and cigarette in hand.For a day’s work, the men receive €10, a half-packet of rolling tobacco and, most importantly, five cans of beer: two to start the day, two at lunch and one for after work.“This group of chronic alcoholics was causing a nuisance in Amsterdam’s Oosterpark: fights, noise, disagreeable comments to women,” said Gerrie Holterman, who heads the Rainbow Foundation project, financed by the Dutch state and donations.“The aim is to keep them occupied, to get them doing something so they no longer cause trouble at the park,” she told AFP.The alcoholics are split into two groups of around 10 people, with each group working three days a week.Shocking or pragmatic?This approach to the problem of anti-social behaviour demonstrates typical Dutch pragmatism which could be found shocking in other countries, but not here.The day begins at around 9am, with the workers drinking two beers and some coffee, if desired, before going to clean the streets.Sat at a large table, Gerrie carefully notes each person’s beer consumption, but there is an atmosphere of trust: if she gets called away, the alcoholics themselves record how much they have drunk.“I think I can speak for the group and say that if they didn’t give us beers then we wouldn’t come,” said Frank, wearing a fluorescent street cleaner’s bib and carrying a bin bag and litter-grabber.“We need alcohol to function, that’s the disadvantage of chronic alcoholism,” said the 45-year-old.Frank says he has been jailed for violence, has never worked for anyone and has no fixed abode.‘Gives our lives structure’For lunch, the team returns to the shed where they get two beers and a warm meal, before heading off again for the afternoon shift.The working day ends with a final beer at around 3.30pm.“You have to see things like this: everyone benefits,” said Gerrie.last_img read more

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