Its looking tough Holder glum after WI World Cup loss

first_imgTaunton: Jason Holder says the West Indies face a tough task to reach the World Cup semi-finals after their dismal seven-wicket defeat against Bangladesh on Monday. Holder’s side fell victim to the second highest run chase in World Cup history as Bangladesh reached 322-3 with 8.3 overs to spare at Taunton. It was a bitter pill to swallow for Holder after they had posted a solid 321-8, only to implode with a combination of woeful fielding and sloppy bowling. Also Read – Djokovic heaps praise on ‘very complete’ MedvedevThe West Indies have lost three of their five matches and, with four games left, captain Holder conceded there is only a slim chance they can make the semi-finals in the 10-team tournament. “It’s looking tough at this present moment, but it’s not impossible. We have to play every game here now as a final,” Holder said. “We’ve got to win every game left to give ourselves a really good chance.” New Zealand and India, both in fine form, are the West Indies’ next two opponents and they must beat both to remain in contention. Also Read – Mary Kom enters quarterfinals, Saweety Boora bows out of World C’ships”If we want to go through into the semi-finals we’ve got to beat the best teams,” Holder said. “We’ve got to back ourselves and be more clinical with the ball. “A few top edges didn’t go our way, but we didn’t help ourselves as well. “We’ve also got to score more runs because we haven’t got a batsman with a hundred yet. “I thought with the pitch dimensions we could have got 365-375 but we were well short, 40 or 50 runs.” Meanwhile, West Indies assistant coach Roddy Estwick urged his side to stick together and come back stronger after suffering a crushing seven-wicket defeat to Bangladesh in the World Cup here. “Stop looking for excuses and start finding solutions,” he said. “If you look at it, I thought we were 60 runs short on that pitch and on that size field. We then didn’t take the opportunities that came our way. We were always behind Bangladesh once they got through to 70/1,” said Estwick after WI lost its third match on the trot in five games. “The big players didn’t kick on but saying that we made 321 runs and should have been able to defend that. But we can stand here, saying ‘if this’ and ‘if that’ — we didn’t play well, we’ve lost the cricket game and that’s that.”last_img read more

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Turo brings the Airbnb of car rentals to Alberta Ontario and Quebec

TORONTO — A company that has taken the Airbnb model and adapted it to car rentals launched Tuesday in three provinces, its first foray outside the U.S., though it wrestles with the same insurance headaches that other startups in the so-called sharing economy have faced.Turo, which debuted as RelayRides in 2009 and now operates in more than 2,500 cities, facilitates vehicle rentals between car owners and anyone needing a ride.People in Alberta, Ontario and Quebec hoping to make money from their cars register them online to rent them to other Turo members.Why business travellers aren’t sold on Airbnb, but rush to Uber and LyftHow crowdfunding site Klondike Strike is changing the way junior miners raise moneyFive daring disruptors win US$1.25M each to help them change the worldTuro determines the rental cost of available vehicles each day based on data like the car’s market value, location and time of year. The company pockets 25 per cent of the rental fee, which includes a charge for the owner’s insurance coverage during the rental.But provincially regulated insurance rules have made a seamless transition north of the border difficult.The limited launch Tuesday “was the most expedient way for Turo to bring peer-to-peer sharing to Canada,” said Cedric Mathieu, Turo’s director of Canada, in an emailed statement.Turo has partnered with Intact Financial Corp. and Belairdirect to provide insurance for Canadian clients, a move that will make the service more attractive to customers, said CEO Andre Haddad.Anyone living in or visiting Alberta, Ontario and Quebec — and approved by Turo’s verification system, which takes into account driving history — can rent a vehicle. They can choose to opt out of insurance, or add basic or premium coverage when renting — at 15 or 40 per cent of the trip’s price. Any claims that arise from a Turo car rental have no impact on the owner’s personal insurance, said Stephanie Sorensen, director of external communications and corporate social responsibility for Intact.But it’s not so simple for people looking to rent out their cars, as insurance companies grapple with how to provide coverage.Only car owners insured by Intact Insurance and Belairdirect who live in those three provinces can list their vehicles on Turo. The insurers have modified their offerings to allow their customers to rent out their vehicles, said Mathieu.“Moving forward, we are working with other leading Canadian insurers to modify their terms and conditions to enable their customers to also participate in peer-to-peer car sharing,” he said. The company also plans to move to other provinces and is “working with each province’s unique insurance laws and regulatory framework to make this happen,” said Mathieu.The insurance issue is one that has consistently cropped up for companies that have aimed to disrupt more traditional business models.Ride-hailing service Uber recently temporarily suspended operations in Edmonton and Calgary after the Alberta government announced it would not make insurance available to drivers until the summer and require them to hold a commercial licence.Airbnb, which allows people to rent a portion or all of their home to travellers, hit a stumbling block when some homeowners complained their places were trashed. One Calgary family, for example, were left with $75,000 in damage following a raging house party.Airbnb, which offers up to $1 million for property damage in certain situations, said it would pay for the repairs. read more

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British Columbia Premier Christy Clark calls on feds Alberta to resolve feud

LUNENBURG, N.S. – British Columbia Premier Christy Clark used a meeting of the premiers Wednesday to push for talks with Alberta and Ottawa to resolve a dispute over her demand for a greater share of the economic benefits from the Northern Gateway pipeline.Clark said there is considerable environmental risk for her province if the $5.5-billion project is built, and B.C. needs to be properly compensated with a greater slice of the economic benefits from the project.“My basic request is for Alberta and Canada to come to the table and sit down with British Columbia and work to figure out how we can resolve this,” Clark said after a meeting with other premiers, and territorial and aboriginal leaders in Lunenburg, N.S.“If that’s going to cause such a big problem that there are trade barriers, there is a very easy way to solve that — no pipeline.”Her comments have put her at loggerheads with Alberta Premier Alison Redford, who has flatly dismissed Clark’s position as one that would “fundamentally change Confederation” because it would mean new negotiations for projects throughout the country.Clark has called for an unspecified “fair share” of the revenues, but declined to say precisely what amount of money she was seeking from the project.“I don’t have a number for you today and I’m not going to negotiate that in public,” she said.Redford said Wednesday she was open to Clark’s overtures to discuss the matter, but she didn’t believe the dispute would be resolved this week.“There will be lots of time for opportunity and discussion,” Redford said as she walked along Lunenburg’s picturesque waterfront before touring the harbour on a tall ship.“It would be wrong for anyone to characterize that we’re not going to talk, but at this point in time, this isn’t the week for it.”Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird weighed in on the dispute, questioning Clark’s stance and reiterating the federal government’s support for the project.“We can’t have a Canada where we try to toll-gate different goods and services in different parts of the country,” Baird told CBC’s Power and Politics.“Alberta has a great resource, it’s a great resource for Canada, and they obviously have to get that resource to market.”According to research in an application filed by Enbridge, 8.2 per cent of the Northern Gateway’s projected $81 billion tax revenue would flow to B.C. over a 30-year period. That equates to $6.7 billion for B.C., while Ottawa is expected to receive $36 billion and Alberta would earn $32 billion.Saskatchewan is expected to top the remainder of the provinces in terms of tax benefit, receiving about $4 billion.Clark said she hadn’t spoken to Redford on Wednesday, but she expected to over the next couple of days as the Council of the Federation meets in Halifax.The pair appeared to keep their distance at the meeting as they mixed with the public along Lunenburg’s historic waterfront and then boarded the Amistad, sitting away from each other as they chatted with other leaders.Other premiers said they didn’t expect the squabble would overshadow other items on the agenda — namely, health care and economic development — but conceded that drafting a national energy strategy could be a tough prospect.Redford has been championing her vision for a pan-Canadian strategy, but has been light on details on how to forge a common, sustainable approach for an array of different energy sources and competing interests.Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall said it would be unrealistic to think the premiers could quickly craft an energy policy that would address decades-old problems and regional differences. Instead, premiers should work on raising Canada’s profile as an energy player, he said.“Let’s start proactively branding the energy that we have to offer the world, committing to do it in a sustainable way, but promoting the fact that we have it,” he said.“So I think the energy strategy — notwithstanding disagreements in any region of the country — if it does that would be worthwhile.”Premier Robert Ghiz of Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick Premier David Alward said they would push for a west-to-east pipeline that could carry unrefined bitumen to refineries in eastern Canada.“New Brunswick is very open to seeing a pipeline come from Alberta to Saint John and the refinery there,” Alward said, though he refused to offer his take on the tussle between Alberta and B.C.“We’re open for business and we’re looking forward, if there is a business case, to seeing that come here.”Quebec Premier Jean Charest also steered clear from the war of words.“I’ll let Premiers Clark and Redford speak to that,” Charest said.He said he was interested in talks to establish a national energy policy — but not without conditions.“First, that there be a respect of provincial jurisdictions,” he said. “And the second one is that if the federal government is going to be part of this, it should be on invitation-only … not because they impose their presence.”Charest also confirmed that the premiers were planning a trip to China in September for a trade mission, though he said his province would not participate because it has done similar trips recently.Enbridge’s (TSX:ENB) proposed 1,177-kilometre twin line would carry heavy oil from Alberta across a vast swath of pristine B.C. wilderness and First Nations territory to a port at Kitimat, B.C., for shipment to Asia.Last week, the company announced it will shore up another $500 million in safety improvements.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version reported that the B.C. government commissioned a report on Northern Gateway’s projected tax revenue. In fact, Enbridge filed the report. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email British Columbia Premier Christy Clark calls on feds, Alberta to resolve feud by Alison Auld, The Canadian Press Posted Jul 25, 2012 7:51 pm MDT read more

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