A unique attraction opened in Croatia: Skywalk

first_imgThe lookout point can be reached by the Biokovo road, which leads from the entrance reception of the Biokovo Nature Park, approximately 6 km east of Makarska, to the highest Biokovo peak, Sv. It runs at an altitude of 1762 meters, which makes it the highest paved road in Croatia. The total value of this project is approximately HRK 31 million, of which grants from the European Structural and Investment Funds amount to around HRK 27 million. The rest is financed by the Fund for Environmental Protection and Energy Efficiency and own funds of users and partners – Makarska Development Agency MARA and the Croatian Mountain Rescue Service – HGSS. Landscaping of the Skywalk Biokovo is part of the project ‘New Adrion – Promoting sustainable use of natural heritage PP Biokovo, which is funded by the European Regional Development Fund under the Operational Program Competitiveness and Cohesion 2014-2020, and is the largest and most demanding financially project in the history of the Public Institution “Biokovo Nature Park”. From the Heavenly Promenade, the view is of Tučepi, Podgora and Makarska, the Dalmatian islands of Hvar, Brač, Vis, Korčula, Pelješac, and in particularly nice weather, after the famous Biokovo bora clears the horizon, the view reaches Cape Monte Gargano in Italy. The lookout is located at an altitude of 1228 meters above sea level, on the 13th kilometer of the Biokovo road, next to the info – center. It is a horseshoe-shaped lookout, with a glass base for walking, which in the most convex point in the length of 12 meters covers the cliffs of Ravna Vlaška. The most impressive and complex part of this EU project is the construction of a horseshoe-shaped belvedere outside the cliff with a glass surface for walking called the Skywalk Biokovo. Approximately eight million kuna was invested in the construction of this building and the reconstruction of the existing lookout. The lookout is open to all visitors from Thursday, July 02nd.center_img Photo: For Biokovo Nature Park Plamenko Cvitić Photo: For Biokovo Nature Park – Plamenko Cvitić As part of the lookout, a geological pillar was built – a three-dimensional view of the cross-section of the rocks that formed the area of ​​Biokovo from its inception until today with a geological table of time and a description of the age and type of rocks. The Skywalk, a unique visitor attraction in Croatia, opened in the Biokovo Nature Park. Skywalk Biokovo is located in the southwestern part of the Biokovo Nature Park, in the area of ​​Ravna Vlaška, at an altitude of 1228 meters above sea level, on the 13th km of the Biokovo road and next to the info – center. last_img read more

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Put America first: Free innocent U.S. citizens from foreign jails

first_imgIn the case of Turkey, Trump has tried and failed.Both he and Vice President Mike Pence asked Erdogan for the release of an imprisoned American pastor, Andrew Brunson, and were rebuffed.But Turkey, like Egypt, is an ally, and the administration has stopped short of using tools that might create more leverage.How about suspending U.S. military aid and sales to Egypt and Turkey until innocent Americans are released?That would show that Trump really does put America first.Jackson Diehl is deputy editorial page editor of The Washington Post.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen? Categories: Editorial, OpinionDuring the Christmas season, it’s worth sparing a thought for a shamefully neglected group of Americans — those unjustly locked up in foreign prisons on political grounds.There are at least 40 of them, in five countries, held as trophies or as de facto hostages and bargaining chips by authoritarian regimes seeking leverage over Washington. In many cases, their only offense was to be a U.S. citizen.About 20 of the Americans — the number is hard to pin down — are held by Egypt, a nominal U.S. ally that receives more than $1 billion in aid annually.Several have been held for years without trial. Turkey, a NATO ally, holds another dozen; strongman Recep Tayyip Erdogan has spoken openly of using them to force the extradition of a Turkish cleric living in Pennsylvania.Venezuela this month brought trumped-up weapons charges against Josh Holt, a Mormon missionary arrested 17 months ago — the same week two relatives of President Nicolas Maduro’s wife were sentenced on drug charges in New York. At least three U.S. citizens and a permanent resident are held by Iran — which, along with North Korea, pioneered the practice of seizing Americans on bogus pretexts and then using them to leverage political and economic favors from Washington.Pyongyang, for its part, still holds three Americans months after its release of college student Otto Warmbier, who died days after he was returned to his family. At one time it appeared that the Trump administration might make the aggressive defense of these citizens a signature of its foreign policy.There was plenty of opportunity: The Obama administration often neglected and played down U.S. prisoners in the name of brokering bigger deals and defending larger interests.Fighting for Americans fits well with President Donald Trump’s stated priority of putting America first.In April, Trump pushed Egyptian ruler Abdel Fatah el-Sissi to free Aya Hijazi, who with her husband had spent three years in prison for setting up a nongovernmental organization to help Cairo street children.Hijazi was released several weeks later and flown home on a U.S. government plane for a showy meeting with Trump.Since then, however, Trump and his staff have appeared to lose interest, with some exceptions.Last month the president took credit for getting three UCLA basketball players out of shoplifting charges in China by appealing to President Xi Jinping.center_img Trump then turned on them when they appeared insufficiently grateful. Meanwhile, appeals for White House action on behalf of other prisoners in Egypt — by family members, lawyers and members of Congress — have failed to stir any response.Take the cases of Mostafa Kassem and Ahmed Etiwy, two of the U.S. citizens held by Egypt. Both have been imprisoned since 2013 after being swept up in crackdowns against protests in which they did not participate.Praveen Madhiraju of the Washington-based group Pretrial Rights International said he and two other advocates had contacted officials at the White House and National Security Council a dozen times about the cases but received no response.A letter from Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., to Trump in August prompted no visible action.But an Irish citizen arrested in the same mosque crackdown that swept up Etiwy was freed in October after intensive lobbying by the Irish government. The Trump administration did recently launch an effort to free the Americans held in Tehran.But so far there’s been no result — and if Trump carries out his threat to reimpose U.S. sanctions on Iran next month, the initiative will be stillborn.last_img read more

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Breaking the monopoly

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Real Madrid planning swoop for Kylian Mbappe’s brother Ethan

first_imgMADRID: Real Madrid are interested in Paris Saint-Germain superstar Kylian Mbappe’s younger brother Ethan.Kylian has long been linked with a move to Los Blancos and boss Zinedine Zidane has not been shy in expressing his interest in the Frenchman.Ethan, 13, is being tipped to follow in the footsteps of his older brother, who at the age of just 21 has already become a phenomenal forward.Ethan impressed at the International Champions Cup Futures tournament last month, playing for PSG’s youth side in front of scouts from the Real Madrid set-up, say Diario AS.Real have long coveted older brother Kylian, and are reportedly lining up a summer move worth a staggering £254m.Mbappe has scored 78 goals in 106 games for PSG and was the French league’s top scorer last campaign, netting 32 times. He also won the player of the season award.The striker joined the French giants from Monaco in 2017 for a total fee of roughly £166m – making him the second most expensive player in history. He has also won the World Cup with France. PSG team-mate Neymar is still the most expensive player in the world at £198m – but if Kylian is lured to Real he would surely smash the current transfer fee record.Like Kylian, Ethan is a forward, and should he go on to fulfil even some of his older brother’s potential then Real would save a fortune by signing him now. His presence at the club would also only serve to make Real a more attractive destination should Kylian be tempted away from Paris. (Agencies) Also Read: Real Madrid frustrated by Athletic and fall behind BarcelonaAlso Watch: Habitat Loss leads to rise in Man-Elephant Conflict in West Karbi Anglong’s Kheronilast_img read more

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Coliseum regular continues to sell programs

first_imgSometimes the shrewdest businessman in the room is the one wearing a Goofy cap.Seventy-two-year-old Charles Franklin has been selling souvenir football programs at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum for nearly six decades now.Constant presence · Charles Franklin, 72, has been selling souvenir football programs at the Coliseum for the last 60 years. – Tim Tran | Daily TrojanIn those six decades, Franklin has been consistent in both his location and his headwear.Franklin, who always sets up in front of Tunnel 21, has worn his signature Goofy hat to every home USC football game since he got it eight years ago. And while the floppy ears dangling over his temples and the brown pom-pon nose don’t appear to be all that relevant to his job selling programs, he says he knows what he’s doing.“I wear [the hat] all the time,” Franklin said, “because it draws the crowd. They like it, and all the customers enjoy seeing the Goofy cap.”Despite suffering severe brain trauma in his youth and being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 1968, Franklin has carved out a satisfying life for himself, working a series of odd jobs throughout Los Angeles.A Beverlywood native now living just outside of Downtown, Franklin began selling programs at the Coliseum in 1952, at the age of 15. Over the years, he’s seen multiple teams pass through the famed stadium. Most of them — including UCLA and the since-relocated Los Angeles Rams NFL franchise — spent less time at the Coliseum than Franklin has.His consistent attendance has made him a fixture at the Coliseum.“He can only remember one time when he was sick,” said John Heil, a close friend who lived with Franklin in a boarding house in the mid-Wilshire district in 1971.Despite his age and his illness, Franklin is able to function well almost on his own, though he does need help with certain things.“He doesn’t drive and he doesn’t cook meals in his own apartment,” Heil said.Sometimes the hand tremors associated with his Parkinson’s disease prove to be an impediment to his program distribution, but it’s rarely enough to keep him out of work.Franklin seems more than aware of his status as a game day staple at the Coliseum.He has met USC coach Pete Carroll (“Yeah, he seemed nice and everything,” Franklin said) and, according to Heil, was once made an honorary Trojan Knight.When asked if he thought people would be disappointed if he were not at a game, Franklin answered only “yes.”Come two hours before kick-off on any given game day, Franklin can be found picking up the 125 programs he’s allotted, stationing himself in front of Tunnel 21 and situating himself to project his voice to any fans within earshot.While Tunnel 21 isn’t actually part of the Coliseum’s designated student section seating, generations of Trojans have become acquainted with the high-voiced pitchman hollering from his place just outside the breezeway.Jeff Michel, a USC alumnus who lives in Long Beach, was one of those students. He said he knew of Franklin while in school, but only now feels as if he knows the man beneath the hat.“I was a freshman in ’71, and then we’d be walking over to the Coliseum for the games, and I’d see him,” Michel, now a regular customer of Franklin’s, said.Several years later, in 1997, Michel tried to reach out to Franklin by offering him some extra work.“I was in the tunnel and I started talking to him and I gave him my business card,” Michel said. “By Monday morning … I had [received] three pages from him within a five-minute period. And I go, ‘Oh boy, he’s a very, very persistent fellow.’”According to Michel, Franklin has an affinity for collecting business cards and forging contacts.“He’s an incredible networker,” Michel said.Franklin acts as if he’s in a current state of unemployment, never withdrawing from the job hunt for even a second. He’s also not above using transparent marketing ploys, like the popular hat, to turn a profit, Michel said.To keep busy, Franklin also holds a five-day-a-week job Downtown.“He does odd jobs over in the Cal Mart building down in the Garment District, including picking up the company’s mail and delivering their mail,” Michel said. “His favorite job is stuffing envelopes.”Though many Franklin’s age would be considering retirement, Franklin says he has no plans of stopping. While he cites the turkey sandwiches and grilled chicken at the International House of Pancakes and Denny’s as one of his favorite ways to spend his earnings, he isn’t holding onto his jobs strictly as a means to finance his diner habit.More than his need for money, Franklin needs work to fill his days.“With Charles, it’s more of a self-image building thing: Always stay busy,” Michel said. “He’s got an incredible work ethic.”No matter what else the future may hold for Franklin, it’s likely going to involve shouting the words “souvenir program” to USC football fans. As long as there are programs to be sold to adoring patrons, he’ll be there.“He’s a lovable character,” Michel said. “He’s a real survivor.”last_img read more

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