The “Epic Week in Croatia” campaign reached 50 million people

first_imgThe third continuation of the “Epic Week in Croatia” campaign, launched by the Croatian National Tourist Board (CNTB) on the social networks Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest, has ended.The third continuation of the “Epic Week in Croatia” campaign included a prize game through which potential tourists could create their ideal vacation through the campaign website through 218 offered activities that they could experience in Croatia. The concept of the campaign and the prize game included choosing the top seven activities that make up a dream vacation, and participants could choose locations, sights, cities, but also flavors that they want to try and taste during their stay in Croatia.The campaign has reached more than 50 million people and more than 60 new fans on social networks, according to the CNTB. This year, over 12 fans took part in the prize draw, which shared the selected top seven activities on their social media profiles. The grand finalists were those participants whose posts collected the largest number likes, and the main prize was won by the person who had the best argumentative description of why she deserves an ideal vacation in Croatia.She was the most creative Sophia from the UK which created the original video post. Sophia will experience exactly the seven activities she has chosen in Croatia, such as kayaking on Karlovac rivers, paragliding in Istria, ziplining in Omis or a tour of the Krka waterfalls, and she has already shown that she is ready for her vacation with enviable knowledge of Croatian regions and culture. , food, and she even learned the words of the Croatian anthem.”This is a promotional campaign launched with the aim of encouraging fans and tourists to create their dream vacation, which they will spend in Croatia. As part of the campaign, a prize game was created through a list of activities that tourists can experience in Croatia. Our goal is to present Croatia as a country with a rich and wide offer in which everyone can find interesting things for themselves. The excellent results of this creative and interactive campaign, as well as the prize games, especially in Austria, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands, Poland, the Czech Republic and Scandinavia, confirm Croatia’s popularity on the international market. ” said the director of the Croatian Tourist Board Kristjan Staničić.This promotional campaign in its first version, conducted last spring when it defeated Ewa from Poland, reached a reach of 13 million people and attracted more than 10 thousand new fans on the social networks of the Croatian National Tourist Board. The second sequel was launched in the fall of 2017 and achieved even better results, ie a reach of 40 million people and more than 50 thousand new fans on social networks, and in Croatia Ilaria from Italy spent her dream vacation.See more about the “Epic Week in Croatia” campaign herelast_img read more

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Japan set to extend virus emergency to May 31

first_imgHe is to explain the government decision at a press conference later Monday.Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike said she had asked Abe’s minister responsible for the virus outbreak Yasutoshi Nishimura about the government’s plan for an extension.”The minister told me they were putting it together for an extension to May 31,” Koike said in a video message to residents late Sunday.As experts met Monday, Nishimura warned the battle against the virus was far from over. Topics : Japan’s government prepared Monday to extend its nationwide state of emergency to the end of May as it braces for a lengthy battle against the coronavirus pandemic.Prime Minister Shinzo Abe declared an initial month-long state of emergency for Tokyo and six other regions on April 7, later expanding it to cover the entire country.It is to expire on Wednesday, but Abe is expected to announce an extension to May 31 after consulting infectious diseases experts.center_img “Preparing for the fact that it will take a long time to deal with this infectious disease, I’d like you to propose concrete examples of a new way of life that would enable people to prevent infections while maintaining social and economic activities,” he told a gathering of experts.Japan’s state of emergency is significantly less restrictive than measures seen in parts of Europe and the United States. It allows governors to urge people stay at home and call on businesses to stay shut.But officials cannot compel citizens to comply, and there are no punishments for those who fail to do so.Local reports said the government would continue to urge residents in 13 high-risk prefectures, including Japan’s biggest cities, to cut person-to-person contact by 80 percent and exercise other strict social distancing rules.But museums, libraries and some other facilities are likely to be allowed to reopen so long as they take anti-virus measures.For the rest of Japan, prefectures will be allowed to loosen restrictions on business closures and small gatherings but residents will still be asked not to travel outside their home regions. Bars and nightclubs will be asked to remain shut.Japan has reported a comparatively small scale outbreak, with more than 15,000 infections and 510 deaths so far.But there have been persistent fears about a spike in infections that could quickly overwhelm the country’s healthcare system.Doctors’ associations have warned that hospitals are already stretched thin, with officials in Osaka even calling for donations of raincoats to serve as protective equipment for health workers stuck using trash bags.Measures have been implemented to try to ease the pressure, including sending coronavirus patients with mild symptoms to hotels for quarantine rather than keeping them in overcrowded hospitals.The government has also said it is increasing testing capacity but continues to face criticism for the relatively low numbers of tests being carried out, in part because of stringent criteria.last_img read more

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Sunday a reminder of Carroll’s greatness

first_imgEuno Lee is a senior majoring in English literature. He is also the managing editor of the Daily Trojan. His column, “Euno What Time it is,” runs Wednesdays. The Super Bowl is finally over: The media circus has subsided, the game has been played, snacks were devoured, Tim Tebow got a contract to talk about how he didn’t need a contract and, oh yeah, the Seahawks won. They didn’t just win: They made the game boring. At halftime it was 22-0 with an unbearable number of close-ups of Peyton Manning looking more uncomfortable than John Boehner during the State of the Union Address.The mastermind behind the victory, of course, was none other than former USC head coach Pete Carroll. So when time expired, as a USC football fan above all things, I was a bit conflicted. Do I cheer? Am I happy for Pete Carroll?To rub salt on my imaginary wound, in his post-Super Bowl press conference, Carroll likened the Seahawk’s 43-8 victory to the Trojans’ 55-19 swamping of the Oklahoma Sooners in the 2005 BCS National Championship game. It’s a strange sentiment coming from someone who, most Trojans believe, hightailed it out of Los Angeles in the face of NCAA sanctions.The argument against Carroll is this: He left at an inopportune time. He didn’t embrace the Trojan spirit — he didn’t “Fight On.” As the saying goes, when the going got tough, Pete got going. It seemed that he left almost as quickly as he enamored himself to the USC faithful.On the morning of National Signing Day, the impact of the sanctions from the Carroll era linger: The Trojans are in the last year of their scholarship reduction, and will once again roll out a thinner roster than their competitors. The finger-pointing involving NCAA sanctions could last forever, but here’s why we can’t blame Carroll: The coach of the Super Bowl-winning Seattle Seahawks was, more or less, the same coach who recruited players at the college level for USC.But really, Pete Carroll did fight on — if you only consider his NFL career. He faltered in his first try at the helm of the New York Jets (6-10) and had a pair of playoff appearances but fell short of massive expectations in New England (27-21) before he was fired. In April of 2009, NFL Films named him one of the top 10 “Coaches Who Belonged in College” when weighing his NFL failures against his success at USC.With last Sunday’s Super Bowl win, Carroll went from a coach who “belonged in college” to the hottest coach in American sports.The Seahawks’ coach knows how to generate excitement — whether it’s bringing in Will Ferrell and Snoop Dogg on the sidelines at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, or Macklemore and Ryan Lewis to the Seahawk locker room. Above all things, Carroll is the consummate optimist. In an interview with former 49ers quarterback and ESPN analyst Steve Young, Carroll revealed his coaching philosophy that was developed in his years at USC.“Really what we did at ’SC, we tried to take care of the whole person and love these guys up and figure out what they could possibly become and then help them get there,” Carroll said. “You’ve got to create a vision for that kid. You’ve got to get them to buy in and then you coach them with that thought in mind. You do that with every person in the program. You treat everybody with great respect in that regard … You don’t have to worry about the games. That’s not even part of our thinking. We’re just trying to do the best we can do, knowing when we do that, we’re really hard to beat.”It’s impossible to hate Carroll as a person, and it’s tough to speak ill of his character when it’s amply evident that his positive attitude has led him to coaching success. Something about the culture in Carroll’s programs gives players a sense of calm in times of high duress, especially considering the Seahawks’ seemingly calculated dismantling of the Broncos in the Super Bowl.The argument for the Trojans supporting Carroll’s newfound professional football success is this: He was a Trojan once. He brought a culture of positivity to the Trojan locker room, a sense of brotherhood in the football program that echoed with Ed Orgeron’s “One Team, One Heartbeat” mantra last season. And as the saying goes: Once a Trojan, always a Trojan. Pete Carroll is a Trojan, in every sense of the word. It’s time we give him credit for representing USC.last_img read more

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