Chelsea and Spurs in race for Nick Pope as Mourinho eyes Lloris replacement

first_imgCHELSEA and Tottenham could go head-to-head in the race to sign Nick Pope, according to reports.The Burnley keeper, 27, has attracted admirers across the Premier League and the London rivals are said to be in for him as they look to replace Kepa and Hugo Lloris respectively.5 Chelsea and Tottenham are both interested in signing Burnley keeper Nick PopeAfter some shaky performances from Lloris, 33, before his horror elbow injury earlier in the season, Jose Mourinho is ready to look to Turf Moor to replace the World Cup winner, according to football.london.Lloris has kept just two clean sheets in 18 appearances this season.And after Paulo Gazzaniga failed to set the world alight – also recording just two clean sheets in the 18 Premier League games in which he replaced Lloris – Spurs fans are beginning to feel it is time for a change between the sticks.CHELSEA NEWS LIVE: Follow for the latest Blues newsAt Stamford Bridge, Frank Lampard has grown increasingly frustrated with Spanish stopper Kepa, 25, and will reportedly encourage the Blues’ hierarchy to land the England ace in his place.Before coronavirus put a temporary stop on Premier League action, the Chelsea boss had banished Kepa to the bench and promoted veteran keeper Willy Caballero to the starting XI instead.And in the next transfer window, he will reportedly try to get rid of the Spaniard for good.MOST READ IN FOOTBALLTHROUGH ITRobbie Keane reveals Claudine’s father was ’50-50′ in coronavirus battleTOP SELLERGavin Whelan has gone from League of Ireland to David Beckham’s InstagramPicturedAN EYEFULMeet Playboy model and football agent Anamaria Prodan bidding to buy her own clubI SAW ROORodallega saw Rooney ‘drinking like madman’ & Gerrard ‘on bar dancing shirtless’ExclusiveRIYAD RAIDMan City’s Riyad Mahrez has three luxury watches stolen in £500,000 raidNEXT STEPJonny Hayes set to move to English Championship having been let go by CelticREF RELEASEDChampions League ref Vincic released by cops after arrest in prostitution raidKEANE DEALEx Man United youth ace David Jones says Roy Keane negotiated a contract for himKepa has been linked with a return to Spain two years after his record £71.6million move from Athletic Bilbao.Earlier this month, Graeme Souness urged the West Londoners to replace the under-fire 25-year-old with Atletico Madrid’s Jan Oblak.The club have been linked with several keepers since Kepa’s downfall – mainly Barcelona’s Marc-Andre ter Stegen, Sheffield United stopper Dean Henderson, Ajax’s Andre Onana, and most recently Bayern Munich legend Manuel Neuer.5 The Blues will only act if they can get shot of Kepa5 Huge Lloris has struggled for form this season and could be replaced by Pope5 Jose Mourinho is reportedly willing to sign the England ace5 Chelsea are also said to be interested in signing Manuel Neuer from Bayern MunichPremier League to ‘restart in July’ and could be finished in just four weeks in hectic dash behind closed doorslast_img read more

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We are headed for a very dark period Brazils researchers fear election

first_img Jair Bolsonaro, front-runner for Brazil’s presidency, is a scary prospect for some.  Andre Coelho/Bloomberg/Getty Images Email By Herton EscobarOct. 16, 2018 , 5:10 PM Beset by economic woes and dissatisfied with the left-wing politicians in power for most of the past 15 years, Brazil appears poised to make a hard turn and elect a far-right candidate, Jair Bolsonaro, as its next president. His rapid ascent has unnerved local researchers, who worry about the future of Brazilian science, the protection of the country’s biodiversity, and its role in the global struggle against climate change.“I think we are headed for a very dark period in the history of Brazil,” says Paulo Artaxo, a climate change researcher at the University of São Paulo (USP) in São Paulo, Brazil. “There is no point sugarcoating it. Bolsonaro is the worst thing that could happen for the environment.”Bolsonaro has vowed to withdraw Brazil from the 2015 Paris agreement, which requires nations to reduce greenhouse emissions to combat climate change, and he plans to eliminate the Ministry of the Environment and fold its duties into the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, and Supply. The “Myth”—as his supporters call him—has also said, while campaigning in the Amazon, that Brazil has “too many protected areas” that “stand in the way of development.” ‘We are headed for a very dark period.’ Brazil’s researchers fear election of far-right presidential candidate Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Jair Bolsonaro leads in the polls for Brazil’s presidential election. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The 63-year-old congressman and former army captain fell just short of winning a majority in the primary election earlier this month, and he heads into a 28 October runoff with a large lead in the polls over left-wing scholar Fernando Haddad. The plight of Brazil’s research establishment, which has endured sharp budget cuts in recent years, has had little mention in the campaigning so far. When recently asked about his possible choice for science minister, Bolsonaro named Brazilian astronaut and former air force pilot Marcos Pontes, a member of his party, as his top preference.A draft campaign document focusing on science—first revealed last week by the Brazilian newspaper O Estado de S. Paulo—offers additional insight into his plans. It pledges to more than double the level of R&D investment in the next 4 years, but would focus most of the extra money and attention on applied sciences such as space and robotics, rather than on basic research at universities.Under the slogan “Brazil above everything, God above all,” Bolsonaro’s campaign exalts national pride, military discipline, and a zero-tolerance, iron-fist stance against crime. Famous for inflammatory remarks about women and minorities, Bolsonaro openly cherishes the 21-year military dictatorship that started with a coup in 1964. Historically, Bolsonaro has had little to do with science, and he recently sparred with the academic community, authoring legislation to favor an unproven cancer therapy. A general he picked to craft his science and education plans defended the teaching of creationism this week, telling O Estado de S. Paulo that students need to know that “Darwin existed,” but not necessarily to “agree with him.”Climate change is one scientific issue Bolsonaro has touched on. He hasn’t specifically questioned that humans are driving global warming, but his son, a popular Brazilian congressman, has done so in a video that celebrates the climate policies of U.S. President Donald Trump. And Bolsonaro has indicated that the Paris agreement’s mandate threatens Brazil’s national sovereignty, especially in the Amazon region, where deforestation for farming and cattle ranching has driven most of the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions.Through law enforcement and mechanisms such as incentives for sustainable practices, Brazilian authorities have substantially reduced Amazon deforestation in the past 13 years, and the nation’s commitment to the Paris climate change accord requires it to continue that trend. Bolsonaro’s campaign instead promises to promote agriculture and mining in the region. One of the generals helping develop the candidate’s policies told O Estado de S. Paulo last week that he missed the days when road builders could cut down trees in the Amazon without being bothered by environmental authorities.Unfettered development of the Amazon would be a “grave mistake,” says Eduardo Assad, a climate change and agricultural scientist at the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation in Campinas. He adds that studies show Brazil’s agricultural production could be doubled by exploiting abandoned or degraded pastures and farmland—“without any additional deforestation.”Haddad, a 55-year-old professor of political science at USP, offers more moderate views, focusing on social justice and sustainable development. But corruption scandals that culminated in the impeachment of Brazil’s then-President Dilma Rousseff in August 2016 and the recent imprisonment of former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who is closely associated with Haddad, have darkened his prospects. In a poll out on 15 October, he trailed Bolsonaro 41% to 59%.Haddad’s campaign has pledged to “rebuild the national science, technology, and innovation system” and provide ample public funding to help double the intensity of the country’s R&D expenditure to 2% of gross domestic product (GDP) by the year 2030. In his campaign’s draft science document, Bolsonaro pledges even more R&D investment, 2.5% of GDP by the end of his term, in 2022.Many researchers doubt that either candidate can fulfill such pledges. “I’ve heard this promise many times before,” says Fernando Peregrino, a science policy expert and president of Confies in Brasília, a national network of foundations that support scientific research and higher education. Brazil lacks the economic policies and fiscal stability to provide generous support for R&D, he believes.Bolsonaro plans to rely heavily on the private sector to boost R&D spending, through economic incentives and partnerships. “Our greatest deficit is in innovation,” says economist Marcos Cintra, president of the Brazilian Research and Innovation Agency in Rio de Janeiro, who is helping craft Bolsonaro’s R&D proposals.As for public spending, the campaign document calls for a “greater balance” between “curiosity-oriented research and research directed towards missions and goals.” Brazil’s Ministry of Education now receives 60% of federal R&D funds, compared with the Ministry of Defense’s 1.5%, and Cintra argues defense should get more. “One of the political difficulties is that public research in Brazil still has a strong academic bias, without focus or specific priorities,” Bolsonaro’s campaign document says.Luiz Davidovich, president of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences in Rio de Janeiro, agrees that it’s important to define national priorities and strategic goals, but says academic and intellectual freedom must also be preserved.Whoever wins the election, scientists here are unlikely to see any relief soon. Federal funding for the Ministry of Science, Technology, Innovation, and Communication has fallen by more than half since 2013, and the budget proposal for 2019—drafted by the current administration—predicts another 10% cut below this year’s.“Even for the most optimistic of us, it’s looking bad,” Artaxo says. Victor Moriyama/Stringer/Getty Images last_img read more

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