Calabar, Camperdown clash in crucial game three

first_imgDefending champions Calabar High and Camperdown High square off today in the decisive game of the ISSA Southern Conference Under-19 best-of-three schools basketball final series at the National Indoor Sports Centre. Tip-off time is 6 p.m.Calabar levelled the series last Friday after they initially won Game One, which was ruled null and void after both teams had problems with their identification cards.Camperdown returned to win the replay and the lead in the series, however, the champions tied the series 1-1, and following that win, coach Ludlow Barker believes his charges are now mentally ready for the challenge.”We had a rough week, but we came back, fought hard, and I am really proud of them … Camperdown did a lot of things right the first game and we did a lot of things wrong. They were better, and we had to really dig deep and come up good Game Two,” he said.He anticipates and an even more testing match from the Oneil Brown-coached Camperdown today.”I expect them to come even harder, but we’ll be ready. We’ll be prepared as the players are more mentally ready to get the job done,” he added..Brown is of the view that Calabar’s talisman Maliek McCarthy was the difference in Game Two and he credited the Calabar star for his “composure and decision making under pressure”. However, he said that his team is fired up for today’s match.”I am 100 per cent confident that we are going to take Game Three. We have everything in place and we have something new to the table as we will be bringing in a new player. He has not played all season long and he should make a big difference to the guard position. So we are very confident we are going to take Game Three,” he said.last_img read more

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Mo and Mo lead Alumni to victory

first_imgMo Charlo said the rims inside Jay Willard Gymnasium felt the same as they did 17 years ago, in 2001, when he last took the floor as a Eureka Logger. On Saturday night, the Nevada Wolf Pack star turned international professional basketball player dropped 14 points including a couple of thunderous dunks as his team of Logger alumni overcame an 18 point halftime deficit to defeat the Loggers varsity team 88-78 Saturday night at Eureka High.“It was fun to come back,” Charlo said. “I haven’t been …last_img read more

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Evolution Is Not Truth-Based Inquiry

first_imgWhen your view has been falsified by evidence but you prohibit other views, you are not engaged in truth-based inquiry.In a book review in Science, Marcos Huerta enjoys a fact-free suggestion about the Cambrian Explosion he found in Wallace Arthur’s new book of sweeping generalities about evolution, Life through Time and Space. Shutting his eyes to fossil data, he switches on his imagination:In the section on biology and evolution, I particularly enjoyed Arthur’s treatment of the evolution and origin of animal life. Here, he uses a metaphor of trees rising from the sea to describe the different branches of evolution that led to the many forms of life on Earth today. One such tree produced animal life, another plant life, and still others led to funguses and brown seaweeds.The same chapter discusses the mystery of the “Cambrian explosion,” which I had before believed to be a burst of evolution and new species. Arthur reveals, however, that it also may have been just an epoch of intense fossilization.Problem solved! They just fossilized more intensely! Wait a minute. We know that cannot be true, because in many places (including China), Precambrian strata continue right into Cambrian strata without evidence of a break in time or conditions. If Precambrian strata could preserve delicate sponge embryos, they could have preserved the ancestors of the Cambrian animals had they existed. Can we get an empirical explanation next time, instead of “it may have”?More disturbing is Huerta’s endorsement of Arthur’s dictatorial stance on scientific inquiry. Arthur “writes passionately and strongly against religious fundamentalism, both past and present, that suppresses truth-based inquiry.” The irony here is rich. First, understand that the Darwinian definition of “religious fundamentalism” is ‘any view that disagrees with materialistic Darwinian evolution’ including intelligent design (which is not religious, but based on following the evidence where it leads). This is how the theistic evolutionists at Biologos escape the dreaded ‘fundamentalist’ label: they take the oath that any view of origins must be materialistic, unguided, and aimless—even if some ‘god’ way out wherever started the universe.To think that intelligent design “suppresses truth-based inquiry” – oh, my goodness. Could a PhD creation biologist submit a response to Science Magazine? How about Nature? How about PNAS? Could we teach public school students about the Cambrian Explosion? Could we encourage them to inquire critically about all the evidence pertaining to Darwinian evolution? Can we take the fake-science icons of evolution out of the textbooks, and encourage truth-based inquiry? Pretty please?(Visited 429 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Boost for SA motor trade

first_imgBus rank in Gandhi Square, Johannesburg.The city’s public bus transport system isundergoing an extensive revamp. (Image:Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClub South Africa.For more photos, visit the image library.)Janine ErasmusTwo major investments into South Africa’s fast-growing motor industry were announced at the end of October. The local operations of Marcopolo and Volkswagen are to pump a total of R3.1-billion ($300-million) into expanding and upgrading their respective manufacturing plants.Bus manufacturer Marcopolo South Africa will invest R97-million ($10-million) into upgrading its manufacturing plant located in Germiston, east of Johannesburg. Managing director of the local operation Fabio Janowski da Cruz made the announcement at the Johannesburg International Motor Show, which ran until 9 November.Cruz said that the expansion would be complete early in 2009. The Brazil-based bus maker opened its local branch in Polokwane in 2000 and moved to Johannesburg the following year. Besides South Africa and its four plants in Brazil, Marcopolo also has operations in Mexico, Portugal, China, and Colombia.The South African branch currently boasts a manufacturing capacity of 700 buses per year but once the upgrade is complete output is expected to increase to 1 800 units annually. The Germiston plant occupies almost 32 000 square metres and produces the Torino, Andare and Viale models.Some of these models, mainly the Torino and Andare, are exported to other African countries such as Tanzania, which is an important market for Marcopolo in South Africa.The expansion will mean the creation of more new jobs. The company’s staff complement currently numbers around 600 but will increase in 2009 to 1 000. Marcopolo has also established a training centre which will help foster the development of specific skills needed to maintain the motor industry’s competitiveness, such as welding, painting, and body building.As part of the ongoing upgrade to South Africa’s public transport system ahead of 2010 and the Fifa World Cup, there are a number of exciting projects in the pipeline around the country. Marcopolo is tendering for Johannesburg’s Rea Vaya bus rapid transport (BRT) project, which is in the initial stages of production.In this case the company will manufacture the 120-passenger articulated Gran Viale bus. A prototype of the popular vehicle has been developed and adapted specifically for the BRT project.Johannesburg is currently served by a bus fleet operated by Metrobus. The fleet consists of 532 single- and double-decker buses, of which about 200 are new models made by Volvo and Marcopolo in 2002.Multibillion investmentVolkswagen South Africa also announced a huge investment of R3-billion over the period up to 2010, mainly into its manufacturing plant in Uitenhage, the largest vehicle factory in Africa. This is in line with the company’s vision and strategy up to 2018.Volkswagen SA is an important link in the group’s global manufacturing chain, having secured a lucrative contract in 2008 to make diesel particulate filters for export to Volkswagen operations around the world.In 2006 the company upgraded its paint shop to the tune of R750-million ($75 000). With a surface area of 45 000 square metres, the new facility offers advanced application systems, materials, environment control and energy recovery systems that are on a par or better than those found elsewhere in the world.Now Volkswagen will continue the improvements with new production technologies in body shop and vehicle assembly operations; a new engine manufacturing strategy to supply both domestic and export markets; and new production systems.The investment is expected to further increase Volkswagen SA’s competitiveness in the domestic and global manufacturing arena, enabling the company to capture more growth opportunities on both fronts.Volkswagen also plans to increase the local content of its South Africa-made vehicles from 40% to 70%. The Marcopolo Gran Viale is also expected to have at least 70% local content.Motor industry gathering speedSouth Africa’s motor industry in both vehicle and component terms is undergoing a period of growth, driven largely by national government, which has implemented several support projects designed to stimulate development of the sector and attract more foreign investment.Among these are the Automotive Supplier Park and the Automotive Industry Development Centre. These initiatives provide the local vehicle manufacturing sector with essential support systems and streamlined supplier chains.The national Department of Trade and Industry and industry representatives are currently finalising the Automotive Industry Programme, which replaces the 1995 Motor Industry Development Programme. Both schemes have been drawn up with the intention of helping the local motor industry reach international competitiveness while remaining affordable at home.The latter programme expires in 2012 and the former will come into effect at that time with a strategy that will cover the period from 2013 to 2020.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.Related storiesRea Vaya gathering speedCape Town’s new bus systemMotor industry to gather speedVW SA wins multibillion contractUseful linksMarcopoloJohannesburg International Motor ShowVolkswagen South AfricaDepartment of Trade and IndustryJohannesburg MetrobusNational Association of Automobile Manufacturers of South Africalast_img read more

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Road trip rewards

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Our family camp-and-fish vacation out West from which we recently returned was a much-needed break and bonding time for me and mine. The trip was a working vacation for me, as I will be featuring it in a future issue of AAA Home & Away magazine, documenting our 18-day drive-and-camp adventure with a rental Airstream trailer in tow. We visited Glacier and Yellowstone national parks, as well as other destinations along the 4,500-mile route. Highlights included watching a grizzly bear cross our path on a hike out of Avalanche Lake in Glacier and watching my son Ethan land two huge cutthroat trout in the Yellowstone River with bison and active thermals venting steam in the background.Unexpected highpoints included feeding trout at the D.C. Booth Historical National Fish Hatchery in downtown Spearfish, South Dakota, the unexpected beauty of Flathead Lake in Montana, and discovering the dramatic geography of the Dells region of Wisconsin. The pre-trip concerns I had about sharing a campground with bikers attending an annual motorcycle rally in nearby Sturgis, SD, were unfounded (they were a reasonably quiet, pleasant bunch), even if the bowfishing trip I had arranged probably was more fun for 16-year-old Ethan and me than for Maria, who spent the 8-to-midnight Wisconsin River excursion taking photos and swatting insects attracted by the halogen lights used to spot the carp, buffalo and quillbacks we targeted.Our first long-distance camping vacation forced us out of our comfort zone in several ways, and more than once I caught gazes lingering on Fairfield Inns we passed along the route. The hikes to mountain lakes we shared in Glacier and Yellowstone were grueling (and wet) at times, but the reward of hooking a cutthroat trout, standing in the chilled spray of a glacier-fed waterfall and watching a wild grizzly bear at eye level more than made up for the effort. And the conversations that ensued between mother, father and son during such off-grid periods were worth gold.last_img read more

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Busting the 5 biggest myths around the connected car

first_imgIT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A… Break the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and… The connected car market in recent years has shifted into high gear, with the number of connected cars hitting our roadways growing rapidly. Analysts estimate that 94 million connected cars will ship in the year 2021, for a compound annual growth rate of 35 percent from the 21 million connected cars that shipped last year. Globally, it’s estimated there will be a total of 380 million connected cars on the roads by 2020. See also: Are connected cars only as good as your cell network?Clearly, the connected car market is on the cusp of explosive growth and widespread adoption. Automakers, their partners, and third-party developers all recognize this enormous potential business opportunity and are rolling out new technologies, applications, and services at a rapid pace, further adding to the connected car ecosystem. The potential benefits to consumers are many, from improved safety to a more efficient and personalized driving experience, to new everyday conveniences. However, as is often the case with emerging technologies, there exist some misconceptions in the marketplace that are causing concern among consumers. In order to showcase the many benefits of the connected car and put those concerns to rest, let’s dispel some of those myths. Myth #1: Connected cars can’t be made secure enough to be safeFact: Connected cars are extremely complex machines. Higher end vehicles often have 100 or more onboard computers continuously monitoring location, component performance, driving behavior and more, and they can produce up to 4 terabytes of data per day. Fortunately, many of the security best practices developed in enterprise IT throughout other industries can be applied to the connected car, and automakers are working closely with high-tech companies and security experts to do so. For example, the convergence of disparate networks in the vehicle to an IP over Ethernet backbone is one big step toward holistic connected car security. With in-vehicle networking standardized to IP, proven security technologies from encryption and authentication to firewalling and intrusion detection and prevention systems (IDS / IPS) can be deployed to give the connected car its own defense in depth.  Artificial intelligence is also being deployed more frequently to help secure connected vehicles by learning and detecting new patterns of malicious behavior (or even non-malicious anomalies that could be early warnings of the need for maintenance). Connectivity management platforms can automate how and when a vehicle connects and what it does with that connection. Through such a platform, automakers can automatically disable connectivity while a vehicle is being shipped, preventing abuse of the connection during transit, and then have it securely resumed once the car has arrived at the dealership. By creating a secure network architecture in their vehicles, automakers can ease concerns about these vehicles and help cautious consumers focus on all the benefits a connected car has to offer. Myth #2: Automakers are solely responsible for securing connected carsFact: In reality, the automaker is just one player in an entire ecosystem of connected car-related technologies. As new vehicle sensors and parts, highway and municipal infrastructure, and applications emerge every day, the responsibility falls on each member of the ecosystem to keep the connected car, its drivers, its passengers and their data safe. Multiple tiers of suppliers, dealerships, developers of aftermarket devices and services, regulatory bodies and even other industries creating devices and services that interact with connected cars all work together to contribute to the security of the entire ecosystem. It is especially important for third parties that provide after-market applications for connected cars to have secure infrastructures. By working with high-tech companies and applying many of the security best practices that have been developed in other industries with the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT), all players in the connected car ecosystem will be able to strengthen security throughout the entire lifecycle of these vehicles and among the devices and applications connected to them.   Myth #3: Privacy concerns about the data connected cars collect are creating a roadblockFact: Connected cars collect a lot of data, from driving patterns and biometrics of the driver to video, radar and Lidar imaging of the surroundings. They can even collect data on your shopping habits. However, this doesn’t necessarily need to be a cause for concern. As in-vehicle network architectures become more secure as described above, automakers can address consumers’ privacy concerns at a very granular level, allowing consumers to determine what type of data they’re willing to share and seamlessly manage how it is used. Connected vehicle data can even be anonymized and still provide value for everyone in aggregate.The benefit of all this data collection is a much improved and more personalized driving experience. For example, based on data about the driver’s past preferences and behavioral patterns, connected cars can offer personalized recommendations such as a hypermiling package that helps drivers get better mileage or a discount at a nearby restaurant based on the time of day and the fact that the driver has dined there before and complimented the venue on social media. Personalized services can include having your car order ahead at Starbucks so your drink is waiting for you when you pull up or having it offer to start itself in the morning a few minutes before you normally leave for work because the temperature outside turned cold overnight. Data collection is also used to create a safer, more reliable and more efficient driving experience. By applying analytics to telematics data, the need for maintenance and repair services can be predicted, and by analyzing how drivers and passengers use vehicle features, automotive manufacturers can improve future vehicle design.Myth #4: The connected car is all about online infotainmentFact: While many people may be more aware of the “infotainment” features of connected cars, such as the ability to stream music and video or integrate with smartphones, connected vehicles are capable of providing so much more. We’re already beginning to see prototypes of new experiences such as immersive video conferencing and collaboration platforms that allow passengers to conduct business meetings while on the road. Connected cars can also save manufacturers and dealers time and money, eliminating recalls and streamlining warranty and service contracts. Self-parking, driver-assistance, and highly automated driving are all popular features that we will see more of in the near future and that rely heavily on vehicle connectivity to the cloud, other vehicles, and roadside infrastructure. Vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communication help connected cars identify safety hazards and avoid collisions, and even enable faster response from emergency responders. All this is just the beginning. With the evolution toward an IP over Ethernet backbone architecture providing flexibility to connect and orchestrate new in-vehicle sensors and actuators, coupled with cloud-based analytics and artificial intelligence, the range of services that connected cars can deliver will be nearly limitless. Myth #5: Automakers are moving quickly toward more advanced connected car capabilitiesFact: While talk in the industry has reached a fever pitch, the reality is that many of the world’s largest car makers are hamstrung by inflexible in-vehicle architectures.  Advanced features like those discussed above require much greater bandwidth for moving data around in the vehicle, more onboard computing power for making the right split-second decisions, and the agility to install new sensors without radically redesigning the vehicle.  The broader attack surface in connected vehicles also calls for a more holistic approach to security.  Nonetheless, the collection of disparate, siloed heritage networks with restricted bandwidth that exists in the industry today makes it very difficult to integrate new features, let alone secure them. Convergence and migration to Ethernet and IP technologies should not only make integration easier and support virtualization of compute to streamline in-vehicle architecture, but should also give manufacturers the agility they need to accelerate into the connected car era.The connected car market continues to grow, and the potential benefits are enormous. However, to realize the full potential, a standardized, extensible, secure in-vehicle network is required to make good use of all the information connected cars can generate. Fortunately, proven architectures such as IP over Ethernet should provide automakers the capabilities and agility they need to keep the connected car market in the fast lane for continued growth. 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle… Shaun Kirbycenter_img For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… Tags:#Cisco#connected car#driverless cars#featured#Internet of Things#IoT#Self-Driving#top Related Posts last_img read more

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How to Care, Create Trust, and Create Greater Value

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now Caring is at the heart of consultative selling. Transactional selling models are built on not caring. This is why they often unwittingly destroy trust. Here is how you can care more, create more trust, and by doing so, create greater value.Be Client-Focused: The more focused you are on yourself, the less focused you are on your client. The more you let go of what you believe you need and focus on helping your dream client get what they need, the easier it is to sell. Being client-focused means you care more about their outcome than serving yourself. This caring creates trust. And it moves you up levels as a value creator.Be Collaborative: If you want your dream client to really open up in discovery, ask them to share their ideas. You aren’t building a solution for people who don’t already have ideas and opinions of their own. In a lot of cases, they may have more experience than you do—especially the experience of working within the four walls of their company. The more you make anything you propose “ours,” the more you prove you care about your client’s ideas and outcomes.Make and Keep Commitments: When you care, you keep the commitments you make, large and small. You ask your prospective clients to make and keep commitments as you move together through the sales process. You also make lots of commitments, some so small you believe that they are meaningless. But your dream client is keeping score. When you care about the details, you create greater trust.Have a Presence: Nothing proves you care more than having a presence at your prospect’s or client’s location. It proves you care enough to show up and keep showing up. When your client has a major issue and you show up to help, you are building your relationship on a foundation of trust.Ask for Commitments You’ve Earned: You want to prove you don’t care, destroy trust, and slip down levels of value? One of the fastest ways to do so is to ask for commitments that you haven’t earned. If you haven’t created enough value or built enough trust to ask for a commitment, go back and do the work first. Equally, if you have done the work, you owe it to your client to help them move forward, and this means you have to ask for the next commitment. In fact, doing less is to prove you don’t care and can’t be trusted.These five behaviors are within your control. All five prove you care, build trust, and move you up the levels of value creation. The opposite behaviors move you down levels as a value creator.QuestionsWhat behaviors do you sometimes engage in that make you something less than client-focused?How do you ensure you are collaborative?What are the commitments you make but sometimes overlook?Presence? You got one, bro?Do you ever ask for commitments you haven’t earned? Do you always ask for the ones you have?last_img read more

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