A unique attraction opened in Croatia: Skywalk

first_imgThe lookout point can be reached by the Biokovo road, which leads from the entrance reception of the Biokovo Nature Park, approximately 6 km east of Makarska, to the highest Biokovo peak, Sv. It runs at an altitude of 1762 meters, which makes it the highest paved road in Croatia. The total value of this project is approximately HRK 31 million, of which grants from the European Structural and Investment Funds amount to around HRK 27 million. The rest is financed by the Fund for Environmental Protection and Energy Efficiency and own funds of users and partners – Makarska Development Agency MARA and the Croatian Mountain Rescue Service – HGSS. Landscaping of the Skywalk Biokovo is part of the project ‘New Adrion – Promoting sustainable use of natural heritage PP Biokovo, which is funded by the European Regional Development Fund under the Operational Program Competitiveness and Cohesion 2014-2020, and is the largest and most demanding financially project in the history of the Public Institution “Biokovo Nature Park”. From the Heavenly Promenade, the view is of Tučepi, Podgora and Makarska, the Dalmatian islands of Hvar, Brač, Vis, Korčula, Pelješac, and in particularly nice weather, after the famous Biokovo bora clears the horizon, the view reaches Cape Monte Gargano in Italy. The lookout is located at an altitude of 1228 meters above sea level, on the 13th kilometer of the Biokovo road, next to the info – center. It is a horseshoe-shaped lookout, with a glass base for walking, which in the most convex point in the length of 12 meters covers the cliffs of Ravna Vlaška. The most impressive and complex part of this EU project is the construction of a horseshoe-shaped belvedere outside the cliff with a glass surface for walking called the Skywalk Biokovo. Approximately eight million kuna was invested in the construction of this building and the reconstruction of the existing lookout. The lookout is open to all visitors from Thursday, July 02nd.center_img Photo: For Biokovo Nature Park Plamenko Cvitić Photo: For Biokovo Nature Park – Plamenko Cvitić As part of the lookout, a geological pillar was built – a three-dimensional view of the cross-section of the rocks that formed the area of ​​Biokovo from its inception until today with a geological table of time and a description of the age and type of rocks. The Skywalk, a unique visitor attraction in Croatia, opened in the Biokovo Nature Park. Skywalk Biokovo is located in the southwestern part of the Biokovo Nature Park, in the area of ​​Ravna Vlaška, at an altitude of 1228 meters above sea level, on the 13th km of the Biokovo road and next to the info – center. last_img read more

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Hand sanitizer and fireworks could make for a dangerous combo, experts say

first_imgFourth of July will look a little different this year due to the pandemic.Many will be lighting fireworks, and now that hand sanitizer has become an essential for nearly everyone around the globe, it could make for a painful combination this Fourth of July when it comes to lighting fireworks.The NSC shared firework safety tips on nsc.org which include; leaving fireworks to the professionals,  understand your state’s laws because each state is different, adults should never use fireworks while impaired by drugs or alcohol, never allow young children to handle fireworks.Because fireworks are apart of the celebration for Fourth of July, and now hand sanitizer is apart of people’s daily routines, experts warn people that hand sanitizer contains alcohol which is highly flammable. “Alcohol and fire do not mix,” National Safety Council (NSC) spokeswoman Maureen Vogel told CNN. “You shouldn’t pair flammable items; it’s the proverbial recipe for disaster.”Stay safe everyone, and Happy Fourth of July!last_img read more

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County To Cultivate Local Farm Businesses And Products

first_imgBy Joseph SapiaIn an effort to bring attention to the farming in Monmouth County, the county government is kicking off a “Grown in Monmouth” promotion of farm products.Farmers and farm-related business owners are invited to the first “Grown in Monmouth” meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 26, at the Rutgers University Research Center, 283 Route 539, in Upper Freehold.“We need more marketing of American produce,” said Monmouth County Agricultural Agent William J. Sciarappa. “We’re getting overwhelmed with imports – Mexico, South America, Europe.”The county is hoping farmers – along with large consumers of food such as restaurants and schools, agricultural money-lenders, municipal officials and other interested – show up.“We have some of the best produce in the world right here in Monmouth County and endorsing these products on a larger scale is long overdue,” said Lillian G. Burry, a member of the county Board of Freeholders and its farming liaison.“An important part of this project will be to conduct research to gain a comprehensive understanding of not only the needs of the county’s agricultural industry, but also the needs of local and regional buyers in order to develop a strategy to foster successful business relationships,” said Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone.At the meeting, those involved will explain the idea of the program, seek feedback from attendees and distribute a survey – gathering information on what farmers are producing and related data, along with who is willing to participate in the program, said John Ciufo, Economic Development’s executive director.Cows sun themselves at W.H. Potter Farm in Holmdel Tuesday. Photo: Joseph SapiaThe county says it also wants to learn how the home-grown products are distributed and the challenges of distribution, then following up by developing strategies to overcome the challenges.Longer-term goals would include marketing county-grown items, according to the county. The program would not interfere with county-grown products being sold out of county, said Laura Kirkpatrick, director of the county Department of Public Information and Tourism.For now, farmers are waiting for the meeting to hear what is said.“I’ve got to find out a little bit more about it,” said William Potter III of the W.H. Potter and Son farm and home and garden center on Red Hill Road in Holmdel.Potter said he plans to attend the meeting because he is a farmer – who raises cows, sheep and goats and because he is on the county Agriculture Development Board, of which he is chairman.Grown in Monmouth is an idea originated in county government and began taking shape about 18 months ago, Ciufo said. The county took the idea to the federal Department of Agriculture and was awarded an $80,000 Rural Business Enterprise Grant in November.With another $80,000 of in-kind services, the Grown in Monmouth initiative is beginning, the latest program of Grow Monmouth.“This is another way the county aims to help local and small businesses,” Arnone said.Grown in Monmouth will be a joint project of the freeholders, Economic Development, Public Information and Tourism, county Division of Planning, and the Rutgers University Cooperative Extension.Grow Monmouth dates back about six years, Arnone said. It is “an initiative of going to and giving information to municipalities, chambers of commerce, to know the county is behind economic development,” Arnone said.“Not only to bring business in, but retention (of business) in the county,” Arnone said.One of Grow Monmouth’s programs dates back to 2012: Made in Monmouth is a free event at Monmouth University for local vendors to sell products – such as food, furniture, jewelry, and clothes – manufactured in the county. About 2,500 people have visited each event and more than 200 sellers are expected at this year’s event on April 9, according to county officials.Grown in Monmouth has hired Spinelli and Pinto Consulting of Chester – in a contract not to exceed $68,173 – to analyze Monmouth County farming, Arnone said. An initial study should be wrapped up in a year, Ciufo said.The county also has been developing a logo for Grown in Monmouth.“We want to brand this,” Ciufo said.The grant’s focus will be on 13 county municipalities considered all or partly rural by the federal agriculture department:  Allentown, Colts Neck, Englishtown, Farmingdale, Freehold Township, Holmdel, Howell, Manalapan, Marlboro, Millstone, Roosevelt, Upper Freehold and Wall. But county officials emphasized all 53 county municipalities are welcome to take advantage of the program.Although the program applies to all-Monmouth grown, it likely has more practical application to “high-value, human food crops, Christmas trees, and nursery stock,” Sciarappa said. Field crops, such as soybeans and feed corn, normally do not go directly to the consumer.Some farmers may have farm markets and have websites to connect directly to consumers, but they may not be able to afford advertising, he said. “It’s mostly word-of-mouth. So, we’re just trying to get the promotion out for Monmouth-grown.”The county consistently ranks in the top 3 of New Jersey’s 21 counties in agricultural production, Sciarappa said. He added the county has another thing going for it.“We’re the most diverse (growing) county in New Jersey,” Sciarappa said. “We grow everything from asparagus to zucchini.”“The agricultural groups are very excited about (now) being recognized,” Burry said. “They feel they may be somewhat overlooked.”“If we could make this successful, this could spread,” Sciarappa said. “The more brains get involved, we could really create a template for the whole state.”There is no pre-registration for the meeting, but more information is available from the county Division of Economic Development by calling 732-431-7470.last_img read more

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Murphy Gives OK For In-Person Classes

first_imgAs of Wednesday, June 16, the total number of positive COVID-19 cases state-wide reached 167,703, an increase of 330 overnight. Of that total, there have been 12,769 deaths, an increase of 47 overnight. In Monmouth County specifically, that includes Atlantic Highlands, 34; Colts Neck, 83; Fair Haven, 28; Highlands, 33; Holmdel, 305; Little Silver, 37; Middletown, 742; Monmouth Beach, 21; Ocean- port, 63; Red Bank, 236; Rumson, 40; Sea Bright, 12; Shrewsbury Borough, 54; and Tinton Falls, 216. NEW JERSEY – When students and staff return to college campuses this year, things will look much different than they have in years past, said secretary of higher education Zakia Smith Ellis Wednesday in a press conference. In-person instructionwill be limited to in-personclinical, lab and hands-onprogramming. Instructioncan also occur completelyoutdoors as long as theyabide by outdoor occupancyrestrictions established bythe state. “This is a crucial step that allows schools to plan summer learning programs and special education services that will provide assistance to those students who need it the most,” said Education Commissioner Lamont O. Repollet in a press release. “We’ve heard from countless parents and educators about the importance of summer learning and ESY, especially now that so many students and families have faced unexpected obstacles with remote learning over the past three months. We believe schools can provide the necessary summer instruction while ensuring the safety of students and teachers, and their families.” On the 100th day since the first death of COVID-19 in New Jersey, the state released guidelines for colleges and universities to reopen for in-person instruction this summer and fall, effective July 1. However, institutions will be required to develop restart plans and have them reviewed by the Department of Health at least 14 days before in-person instruction can resume. The article originally appeared in the June 18-24, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. Some students will be permitted to return to residential facilities, but there must be quarantine and isolation spaces on campus and common spaces must be closed. Campus dining will be adjusted to follow statewide restrictions in place currently, as will transportation and athletic operations. Career and training schools may also reopen July 1 in accordance with proper safety and health protocols. “We know that many students prefer in-person learning, particularly those who are experiencing hardship,” or for those whose home environment isn’t favorable for educational purposes, said Ellis. Individuals on campus will be required to wear face masks or coverings in indoor spaces and are recommended to do the same outdoors, especially when others are present. Institutions will be responsible for creating testing protocols and accommodating anyone with positive diagnoses or symptoms of the virus. Social distancing will be mandated and equipment must be sanitized regularly, Ellis said. All in-person programs must be conducted with proper health and safety protocols, according to the state, and remote learning may still proceed for students after July 6. Programs may include traditional summer school, ESY programming with appropriate instruction for special needs students, credit recovery programs and more. Earlier in the week, the Department of Education released guidelines for summer education programs to be conducted in-person, including extended school year (ESY), according to the governor’s office. It will take effect July 6. “As we move forward in our restart and recovery, these institutions will play a huge role. They are where our future workforce is being created and where many advances in the life sciences and engineering and in other areas that will have a tremendous impact on our larger economy, are taking shape,” said Murphy Wednesday. “Their health and the health of everyone on campus is critical to the overall public health of our state.” By Allison Perrine last_img read more

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