Tony Becca: Cricket’s dwindling reputation

first_img The latest problem surrounds the colour of sightscreens used by some teams in the limited over matches and particularly the use of blue sightscreens, instead of black sightscreens, as called for by the conditions of play. Melbourne used a blue sightscreen at Melbourne Oval in the match against St Thomas some weeks ago and won the match comfortably. Then, St Thomas protested the match. They claimed they lost the match because of the colour of the sightscreen and claimed they had complained about it to the umpires. Melbourne said that the sightscreen had nothing to do with the result, that they had used it before, including last season, and no other team had complained. The disciplinary committee of the JCA threw out the protest. St Thomas, however, appealed the decision and the committee ruled that the match must be replayed. Apart from saying that it was difficult to get the black cloth to make the sightscreen, Melbourne also claimed that other clubs had used a blue sightscreen this season, had used a blue sightscreen last season and there was no complaint on any occasion that the blue sightscreen was used when it should not have been used. They also argued that St Thomas’ protest came after the match had started. According to reports, Melbourne argued also that the fact that a blue sightscreen was used by them during last season, that it was used by other clubs during last season and again this season, and that the JCA, who knew about it but did nothing about it, had by their silence agreed with its use. On top of that, Melbourne argued that in playing with the blue sightscreen during the match, they and the two umpires, like all the other umpires in all the other matches in which the blue sightscreens were used, believed that the blue sightscreen was quite in order. If the blue sightscreen, however, was not in order and if Melbourne were found guilty of using it despite the JCA’s lack of action, then St Thomas should have been awarded the match. The question, however, is this: did Melbourne deserve to be penalised for using a blue sightscreen instead of a black sightscreen? In the circumstances, the answer is ‘no’ and it is no for the following reasons: although Melbourne at the time had been working on installing a sightscreen, which can be easily switched from white to black and vice versa, and had acquired a black sightscreen after the St Thomas protest, because of its silence on the use of the blue sightscreen during last season and again this season, the JCA had set a precedence. On top of that, the umpires, in that match or in other matches, had no objection to the use of the blue sightscreen, and the blue sightscreen had no effect whatsoever on the outcome of the match. The appeals committee has said that it dealt with the Melbourne case because it was reported to them and also that they could not have dealt with others simply because no one else reported the matter to them. That, to me, should not be the case. The JCA knew about the use of blue sightscreens and as a national association, as the body running the competition, they had a right to deal with the entire issue. They had a responsibility to rule on the matter when it first surfaced and by not doing so they reneged on their responsibility. The replay of the match, however, was scheduled for last Saturday. It was changed on Thursday to the Sunday and Melbourne protested. What unfolded was bad for the game, no doubt about that. The situation at Melbourne Oval was that Melbourne prepared the ground, prepared lunch and turned up on Saturday for the match; and St Thomas and the umpires turned up on Sunday for the match. The JCA has since ruled against Melbourne for their behaviour. colour of sightscreens Once upon a time, and not too long ago, cricket was known as a gentleman’s game, so much so that whenever anyone did something wrong he was told loud and clear for all to hear “that’s not cricket”. While the game remains a good game to many, however, cricket has changed, probably for the worse, especially in Jamaica and because of a weak governing body. Cricket, national and international cricket, has rules, but in Jamaica they seldom mean anything to anyone any more. They are, most times, meaningless to administrators, players, or spectators, excepting those times whenever something is at stake. In Jamaica, anything and everything goes. Administrators, and members of the Jamaica Cricket Association (JCA) are mostly selfish people; they are concerned only about themselves and their own clubs or parishes. Everything, important or not, urgent or not, is done at their own pace and mostly at a slow pace, unless things are really urgent. The JCA does not operate with the seriousness of a national association, but rather, as Jamaicans tend to say, like a ‘fry fish shop’. The JCA usually turns a blind eye to most things until those things become a problem for everybody. Melbourne will not be in action in today’s quarter-finals and they have been summoned to a meeting by the JCA. As far as Melbourne’s part in the competition is concerned, therefore, it is over. The association, however, needs to answer some questions. What would have happened had the teams who lost matches while playing before a blue sightscreen protested and is it that Melbourne will be the only team to suffer when other teams committed the same breach in the same competition run by the same JCA? St Thomas were within their right to protest, no doubt about that. Melbourne, however, were harshly treated by the JCA in the first instance. A replay should not have been ordered. The blame rested entirely with the JCA for sitting by and twiddling their thumbs. They should have found a way to appease St Thomas. The whole affair is simply not cricket. Melbourne summonedlast_img read more

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DD HEALTH: GOOD FOOD CHOICES FOR GOOD CHOLESTEROL

first_imgDD HEALTH: Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that occurs naturally in the body. It plays a vital role in how every cell works – but having too much cholesterol in the blood is one of the risk factors in the development of coronary heart disease.One in two Irish people over 50 have high cholesterol and heart disease is still the biggest killer in this country.It is possible for many people to reduce their cholesterol by 10% – 15% just by eating healthily. Making small but significant changes to the diet is really worth the effort. In Ireland and Europe generally, it is recommended that levels of cholesterol in the blood should not be above 5.0mmol/l ( about 190mg/dl).For example, the total amount in the body of a person weighing 70 kilograms (10 stones) is around 140 grams, and the amount present in the blood is 3.6 to 7.8 m.mol per litre or 150 to 250 milligrams per 100 millilitres.A blood-cholesterol level above 6 m.mol per litre (238 mg per 100 ml) is considered high, depending on age.A huge number of factors such as genetics, nutrition, exercise and other lifestyle factors can influence the type and amount of cholesterol in the body There are two kinds that are particularly important.LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein)-cholesterol, is often called “bad cholesterol”, since it contains a relatively high amount of cholesterol that can build up in the arterial walls. However, HDL (High Density Lipoprotein)-cholesterol is able to remove and carry cholesterol from the arteries and take it to the liver, where it is eliminated – which is why it is often called “good cholesterol”.Our livers make a lot of our body’s cholesterol, but what we eat also affects our cholesterol levels too. Making the right food choices can really help you to manage your cholesterol and reduce your risk of heart disease as well as other health problems.Good Cholesterol foods:. Piece of red meat. Salmon. Some eggs. Lentils. Garlic bulb. Unsalted nuts. Mixed Herbs Bad Cholesterol Foods:. Processed meat – Salami. Bacon. Block of butter. Pate. Biscuits. SaltFats and protein rich foodsEat less cakes, biscuits, pastries, confectionary, fried foods and take aways as this will help to reduce some of the bad fats in your diet such as trans fats and saturated fats.Reduce the amount of processed meats you eat (bacon, salami, burgers etc) and limit your red meat to 3 six ounce servings of lean red meat a week.If you like eggs and your cholesterol is high, you can eat between 4 to 6 eggs per week, unless your doctor advises you to reduce further. Fish and fish oilsEating oily fish (such as salmon, trout, fresh tuna, sardines, herring and mackerel) twice a week can help to reduce the risk of heart disease.Soluble fibreEat porridge or unsweetened muesli, fruits and pulses (peas, beans and lentils).Fruit and vegetablesEating at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day can help to reduce your risk of heart disease.Irish men, especially in the younger age group only eat about half the recommended portions of fruit and vegetables, according to the Irish Heart Foundation. In general, we eat less fruit and vegetables than other EU countries. However, it is important to eat at least five portions every day, including:• Fresh vegetables, cooked or raw.• Salads.• Potatoes eaten in their jackets, without added fat.SaltReducing the amount of salt you eat will also help keep your blood pressure down. Look out for hidden salt in certain breads, breakfast cereals, processed meats and cheese, dried soups and sauces, salty crisps and nuts.AlcoholToo much alcohol can damage the heart muscle, increase blood pressure and also lead to weight gain. However, moderate drinking (between 1 and 2 units of alcohol a day) can help protect the heart in men aged over 40 and women who have gone through the menopause.Also try to exercise regularly.DD HEALTH: GOOD FOOD CHOICES FOR GOOD CHOLESTEROL was last modified: May 28th, 2016 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:(Low Density Lipoproteinbad cholesteroldonegal daily healthgood cholesterolHigh Density Lipoproteinhow to lower cholesterol levelslast_img read more

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