Finding the ‘Formula of a South African’

first_img22 November 2011Brand South Africa has launched an ambitious interactive project aimed at co-creating – with the help of as many South Africans as possible – “the formula of a South African”, a recipe for how we ought to behave as a people.“When the New South Africa was created, and Madiba was in charge, we were like young children,” Brand SA says on the website created to drive the initiative, www.formulasa.co.za.“We had the feeling that the world was a great place, and that we were on the right path. Now the New South Africa is a teenager, and like most teenagers, it isn’t sure of who and what it is, and neither are we as a people.”To help solve this, while placing societal accountability firmly in the hearts and minds of South Africans, Brand SA has commissioned change consultancy Bluprints to facilitate the collective formulation of the “DNA” of a South African.What should we do more of – and less of?The process will involve giving all citizens, across all demographics, the opportunity through NGOs, community initiatives and social media to have their say in defining what it is that makes us uniquely South African.This will begin simply with getting people’s intuitive opinions on “what we need to do more of and less of to be more successful as South Africans” – the first phase of the process, which is now open online.People’s suggestions will then be grouped into common behaviours, and – starting in early 2012 – everyone will be given the chance to vote, via their mobile phones, on the behaviours they believe are most important.“The results of this voting will create a formula of what we need to do more of, and less of, to be great South Africans.”How we measure upThe final Formula of a South African will then be expressed in an array of art forms “truly reflecting the cultural diversity of our nation” and unveiled in the second half of 2012.Thereafter, every year, South Africans will be asked to rate how well – or how poorly – we’re behaving according to our own standards, in order to help create a genuine shift towards a more successful society.“No formula of a South African would be complete without YOU,” says Brand SA. “We need your help to discover what it is that makes us great, and what it is that lets us down.“The time for sitting back and pointing fingers at others is over. It’s up to YOU to help us to discover what it is that makes us, us.”SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Busting the 5 biggest myths around the connected car

first_imgIT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A… Break the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and… The connected car market in recent years has shifted into high gear, with the number of connected cars hitting our roadways growing rapidly. Analysts estimate that 94 million connected cars will ship in the year 2021, for a compound annual growth rate of 35 percent from the 21 million connected cars that shipped last year. Globally, it’s estimated there will be a total of 380 million connected cars on the roads by 2020. See also: Are connected cars only as good as your cell network?Clearly, the connected car market is on the cusp of explosive growth and widespread adoption. Automakers, their partners, and third-party developers all recognize this enormous potential business opportunity and are rolling out new technologies, applications, and services at a rapid pace, further adding to the connected car ecosystem. The potential benefits to consumers are many, from improved safety to a more efficient and personalized driving experience, to new everyday conveniences. However, as is often the case with emerging technologies, there exist some misconceptions in the marketplace that are causing concern among consumers. In order to showcase the many benefits of the connected car and put those concerns to rest, let’s dispel some of those myths. Myth #1: Connected cars can’t be made secure enough to be safeFact: Connected cars are extremely complex machines. Higher end vehicles often have 100 or more onboard computers continuously monitoring location, component performance, driving behavior and more, and they can produce up to 4 terabytes of data per day. Fortunately, many of the security best practices developed in enterprise IT throughout other industries can be applied to the connected car, and automakers are working closely with high-tech companies and security experts to do so. For example, the convergence of disparate networks in the vehicle to an IP over Ethernet backbone is one big step toward holistic connected car security. With in-vehicle networking standardized to IP, proven security technologies from encryption and authentication to firewalling and intrusion detection and prevention systems (IDS / IPS) can be deployed to give the connected car its own defense in depth.  Artificial intelligence is also being deployed more frequently to help secure connected vehicles by learning and detecting new patterns of malicious behavior (or even non-malicious anomalies that could be early warnings of the need for maintenance). Connectivity management platforms can automate how and when a vehicle connects and what it does with that connection. Through such a platform, automakers can automatically disable connectivity while a vehicle is being shipped, preventing abuse of the connection during transit, and then have it securely resumed once the car has arrived at the dealership. By creating a secure network architecture in their vehicles, automakers can ease concerns about these vehicles and help cautious consumers focus on all the benefits a connected car has to offer. Myth #2: Automakers are solely responsible for securing connected carsFact: In reality, the automaker is just one player in an entire ecosystem of connected car-related technologies. As new vehicle sensors and parts, highway and municipal infrastructure, and applications emerge every day, the responsibility falls on each member of the ecosystem to keep the connected car, its drivers, its passengers and their data safe. Multiple tiers of suppliers, dealerships, developers of aftermarket devices and services, regulatory bodies and even other industries creating devices and services that interact with connected cars all work together to contribute to the security of the entire ecosystem. It is especially important for third parties that provide after-market applications for connected cars to have secure infrastructures. By working with high-tech companies and applying many of the security best practices that have been developed in other industries with the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT), all players in the connected car ecosystem will be able to strengthen security throughout the entire lifecycle of these vehicles and among the devices and applications connected to them.   Myth #3: Privacy concerns about the data connected cars collect are creating a roadblockFact: Connected cars collect a lot of data, from driving patterns and biometrics of the driver to video, radar and Lidar imaging of the surroundings. They can even collect data on your shopping habits. However, this doesn’t necessarily need to be a cause for concern. As in-vehicle network architectures become more secure as described above, automakers can address consumers’ privacy concerns at a very granular level, allowing consumers to determine what type of data they’re willing to share and seamlessly manage how it is used. Connected vehicle data can even be anonymized and still provide value for everyone in aggregate.The benefit of all this data collection is a much improved and more personalized driving experience. For example, based on data about the driver’s past preferences and behavioral patterns, connected cars can offer personalized recommendations such as a hypermiling package that helps drivers get better mileage or a discount at a nearby restaurant based on the time of day and the fact that the driver has dined there before and complimented the venue on social media. Personalized services can include having your car order ahead at Starbucks so your drink is waiting for you when you pull up or having it offer to start itself in the morning a few minutes before you normally leave for work because the temperature outside turned cold overnight. Data collection is also used to create a safer, more reliable and more efficient driving experience. By applying analytics to telematics data, the need for maintenance and repair services can be predicted, and by analyzing how drivers and passengers use vehicle features, automotive manufacturers can improve future vehicle design.Myth #4: The connected car is all about online infotainmentFact: While many people may be more aware of the “infotainment” features of connected cars, such as the ability to stream music and video or integrate with smartphones, connected vehicles are capable of providing so much more. We’re already beginning to see prototypes of new experiences such as immersive video conferencing and collaboration platforms that allow passengers to conduct business meetings while on the road. Connected cars can also save manufacturers and dealers time and money, eliminating recalls and streamlining warranty and service contracts. Self-parking, driver-assistance, and highly automated driving are all popular features that we will see more of in the near future and that rely heavily on vehicle connectivity to the cloud, other vehicles, and roadside infrastructure. Vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communication help connected cars identify safety hazards and avoid collisions, and even enable faster response from emergency responders. All this is just the beginning. With the evolution toward an IP over Ethernet backbone architecture providing flexibility to connect and orchestrate new in-vehicle sensors and actuators, coupled with cloud-based analytics and artificial intelligence, the range of services that connected cars can deliver will be nearly limitless. Myth #5: Automakers are moving quickly toward more advanced connected car capabilitiesFact: While talk in the industry has reached a fever pitch, the reality is that many of the world’s largest car makers are hamstrung by inflexible in-vehicle architectures.  Advanced features like those discussed above require much greater bandwidth for moving data around in the vehicle, more onboard computing power for making the right split-second decisions, and the agility to install new sensors without radically redesigning the vehicle.  The broader attack surface in connected vehicles also calls for a more holistic approach to security.  Nonetheless, the collection of disparate, siloed heritage networks with restricted bandwidth that exists in the industry today makes it very difficult to integrate new features, let alone secure them. Convergence and migration to Ethernet and IP technologies should not only make integration easier and support virtualization of compute to streamline in-vehicle architecture, but should also give manufacturers the agility they need to accelerate into the connected car era.The connected car market continues to grow, and the potential benefits are enormous. However, to realize the full potential, a standardized, extensible, secure in-vehicle network is required to make good use of all the information connected cars can generate. Fortunately, proven architectures such as IP over Ethernet should provide automakers the capabilities and agility they need to keep the connected car market in the fast lane for continued growth. 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle… Shaun Kirbycenter_img For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… Tags:#Cisco#connected car#driverless cars#featured#Internet of Things#IoT#Self-Driving#top Related Posts last_img read more

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Video: Refs Absolutely Botch Late Call In Syracuse vs. Gonzaga

first_imgA close up of Trevor Cooney not out of bounds.trevor cooney out of boundsSyracuse survived Gonzaga Friday night, but it wasn’t without controversy. The Orange, which rallied to overcome a five-point deficit late, almost lost in heartbreaking fashion. A phantom out-of-bounds call was at the center of the storm.Gonzaga, trailing 61-60, had a chance to take the lead with 20 seconds to play, but an errant pass from Josh Perkins wound up in the hands of SU’s Trevor Cooney. Cooney, upon collecting the ball, did all he could to keep his feet inbounds.Cooney, however, was whistled out of bounds. As you’ll see below, it was a bad call.Channeling Cooney’s Balance @bballbreakdown #MarchMadness @AdamZagoria, @espn, @GregAnthony50 https://t.co/7LvScmvE9P— BBiomechanics (@BBiomechanics) March 26, 2016Yep, he’s in, what a play by Cooney. #Syracuse pic.twitter.com/wG4pfaReio— XFINITY Sports (@XFINITYSports) March 26, 2016Let’s review how much time is left.OK, now let’s make the wrong call.— Darren Rovell (@darrenrovell) March 26, 2016#cooney was #inbounds #Sweet16 #Syracuse wooooooo pic.twitter.com/tZhkMHjAnw— Grove Street (@Grove_Street2x) March 26, 2016Tyler Lydon blocked the Bulldogs’ shot on the ensuing possession, and after two Lydon free throws, the Orange emerged victorious anyway. They’ll next get UVA in an all-ACC Midwest region showdown.last_img read more

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GLOBAL PHENOMENON CARMILLA NAMED BRAND CONTENT OF THE YEAR AT MIPTV 2018

first_imgAdvertisement With over 71 million views, “Carmilla” has been viewed in 193 countries and translated into over 20 languages, with more than half the views coming from outside North America. Viewers of this scripted digital series are 91% female and 9% male, with 48% of those viewers in the 18-24 demo, according to YouTube analytics. Fans of the series, who refer to themselves as “Creampuffs” after a line in the series, have catapulted “Carmilla” leads Elise Bauman and Natasha Negovanlis to international stardom; most recently, Bauman was awarded the Fan’s Choice Award by the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television at the 2018 Canadian Screen Awards, an award that co-star Negovanlis won the year prior.“Carmilla” is created and produced by Toronto-based Shaftesbury, in association with U by Kotex®, A Kimberly-Clark company, as executive producer, and was co-created and written by award-winning playwright Jordan Hall, and directed by Spencer Maybee. The series puts a modern spin on the cult gothic vampire novella by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, meshing the vlog aesthetic with scripted storytelling as it follows the adventures of university student Laura (Bauman), whose world is turned upside-down after a vampire (Negovanlis) moves into her dorm room.Season One launched in August 2014, Season Two in June 2015, and the third and final season in September 2016, for a total of 108 x 5 minute episodes. The series boasts one of the most engaged fandoms in the world, particularly with the global queer community, with nearly 500,000 fans across its official social accounts on YouTube, Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, Facebook, and YouNow.Due to overwhelming fan demand, Shaftesbury announced in 2016 that it would extend the series into a feature-length movie. “The Carmilla Movie” premiered in fall 2017, playing for one night only at Cineplex theatres across Canada, before making its world television premiere on Hollywood Suite.“Carmilla” has been recognized with numerous national and international nominations and awards including the Streamy Awards, the Webby Awards, the Shorty Awards, and the Canadian Screen Awards. Shaftesbury Sales Company holds worldwide distribution rights for the series and film.About MIPTV – MIPTV (9-12 April 2018, Cannes) is the flagship and leading global TV and digital content market. Each April, over 10,000 professionals from across the international TV and digital entertainment ecosystem connect to launch and discover new content, forge partnerships, negotiate financing and distribution agreements, find co-production opportunities and explore the latest trends.MIPTV is preceded by the biggest weekend in unscripted content (7-8 April 2018), comprising MIPDoc, the world’s largest screenings library, conference and co-production marketplace for the factual community, and MIPFormats, the discovery showcase for the global formats community. www.miptv.com​About  Shaftesbury –  Shaftesbury is an award-winning creator and producer of original content for television, film, digital, and brands. Shaftesbury’s current slate includes 11 seasons of Murdoch Mysteries for CBC, UKTV, and ITV STUDIOS Global Entertainment, detective drama Frankie Drake Mysteries for CBC and UKTV, and two seasons of critically acclaimed thriller series Slasher for Netflix. Shaftesbury’s digital arm produces original digital, convergent, and branded entertainment projects including the global phenomenon Carmilla, scripted comedy Upstairs Amy for Walmart and Interac®, supernatural drama Inhuman Condition, and the Slasher VR app for iOS, Android, and Oculus Rift. Shaftesbury’s branded entertainment division drives profitable engagement with millennials using scripted series, turning brands into executive producers. Recent brand partners include Walmart, Interac®, U by Kotex®, and RBC. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Facebook Paris – MIPTV has chosen to give its Brand Content of the Year Award to Kimberly-Clark’s global phenomenon “Carmilla”, a branded entertainment digital series that has evolved to include a feature film, book deal, and primetime series in development, becoming a brand in its own right.The flagship global TV and digital content market, MIPTV takes place in Cannes, France from 9-12 April 2018. The 2018 Brand Content of the Year Award will be presented during the “Carmilla” Keynote Showcase that will take place at noon on Wednesday 11 April in the Auditorium Debussy.The “Carmilla” Showcase presents a new approach to producing original scripted content. Shaftesbury, the producers behind this successful brand, is an award-winning creator of scripted content for TV, film, and digital, and have become leaders in branded entertainment. Shaftesbury CEO Christina Jennings and SVP of Branded Entertainment Kaaren Whitney-Vernon will discuss their successes in partnering with global brands to create scripted series that have garnered both critical acclaim and international fandoms. Kimberly-Clark will accept the Brand Content of the Year award and offer insights into how “Carmilla” has driven engagement with consumers and global sales. Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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One time use of Marijuana could affect teen brains finds study

first_imgBy Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDJan 15 2019A survey from 2018 had found that 2.1 million students from middle and high schools have smoked marijuana at least once. A new study looked at the effects of marijuana or cannabis on the brains of adolescents.The results of the study were published in the latest issue of the Journal of Neuroscience this week. The researchers were alarmed to find that marijuana or cannabis can affect the teenage brains after even a single use.The team of researchers looked at the brains of 46 fourteen year old students from England, Ireland, France and Germany. They noted that those of the participants who had smoked just one or two joints had a higher brain volume compared to the teenagers that did not. The gray matter in these teenagers was larger. This area of the brain is altered with maturity of the brain. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) says that with aging the brain size normally decreases. The researchers have said that this study shows that marijuana could affect the normal aging process of the brain.Hugh Garavan, lead author of the study and a professor of psychiatry at the University of Vermont School of Medicine, explained that the cortical region of the brain of these teenagers were “going through a process of thinning.” He said that the normal maturation and pruning process of the brain was being affected by the marijuana. “So, one possibility is that the cannabis use has disrupted this pruning process, resulting in larger volumes (i.e., a disruption of typical maturation) in the cannabis users. Another possibility is that the cannabis use has led to a growth in neurons and in the connections between them,” he said.Related StoriesPosterior parietal cortex plays crucial role in making decisions, research showsNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskGaravan said in a statement, “Most people would likely assume that one or two uses (joints) would have no impact, so we were curious to study this — and especially to investigate if first uses may actually produce brain changes that affect future behavior like subsequent use.”The team accepts that this is a small study with a small number of participants and thus the results should be interpreted carefully. Larger and long term studies are needed to understand the effects of marijuana on the brain and health. Marijuana contains tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, a psychoactive component that leads to several problems including slowing of the reaction time, raising heart rates and also affects the short term memory of the individual.“As is always the case, more research is needed to replicate these effects, to try to understand the mechanisms, and critically, to unearth what additional factors may identify which cannabis-using kids show these effects and which ones don’t,” said Garavan.Data from the National Institute of Drug Abuse has said that 32.6 percent of the tenth graders have used marijuana at least once. On the flip side, 10 states in the United States and the District of Columbia have legalized the recreational use of marijuana. It is also being studied in disease conditions such as pain, muscle spasms, seizures, nausea seen with cancer chemotherapy etc. Source:http://www.jneurosci.org/content/early/2019/01/14/JNEUROSCI.3375-17.2018last_img read more

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Colon cancer could be made more aggressive by common oral bacteria

first_img Source:Fusobacterium nucleatum promotes colorectal cancer by inducing Wnt/β‐catenin modulator Annexin A1. EMBO. DOI:10.15252/embr.201847638. By Lois Zoppi, BAMar 5 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Findings published by researchers at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine have identified a common oral bacterium that accelerates colon cancer growth. The discovery could make the detection and treatment of aggressive colon cancers easier.Rost9 | ShutterstockColon cancer is the second largest cause of death in the US. The American Cancer society released figures showing that in 2017 over 95,000 new cases of colon cancer were predicted. The figures also showed that colon cancer incidence rates were “fairly equal” between men (47,700) and women (47,280).“Almost 40% of deaths” from rectal cancer are misclassified as colon cancer on death certificates, reliable statistics on deaths from colon cancer, in particular, are difficult to generate.However, the Colorectal Cancer Facts and Figures 2017-2019 report predicted that an estimated 27,150 men and 23,110 women would die from colorectal cancer in 2017.It is well documented that colon cancer is caused by genetic mutations that build up over a period of decades.Now scientists have been able to compose a more detailed picture, and have shown that approximately a third of colorectal cancers are linked to F. nucleatum bacteria, which occurs in tooth decay.Leader of the study Yiping W. Han Ph.D., professor of microbial sciences at Columbia University College of Dental Medicine and Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons said that “mutations are just part of the story,” and that “other factors, including microbes, can also play a role.”Han’s new study builds on previous work by her research team that found that F. nucleatum creates FadA adhesin, a molecule that triggers a signaling pathway in colon cells that has been linked to several cancers.Unusually, the researchers found that FadA adhesion only speeds up the growth of cancerous cells and leaves healthy cells untouched, and colon cancers associated with the bacteria F. nucleatum often become some of the most aggressive.The motivation of this new study was to “find out why F. nucleatum only seemed to interact with the cancerous cells,” Han explained.Using cell cultures, researchers found that protein Annexin A1, responsible for stimulating cancer growth, was not present in noncancerous colon cells. Later tests both in vitro and in mice confirmed that disabling Annexin A1 stopped F. nucleatum bacteria from binding to cancer cells, thus inhibiting their growth.Additionally, it was discovered that F. nucleatum actually increased the production of Annexin A1, which drew in more of the bacteria. We identified a positive feedback loop that worsens the cancer’s progression. […] We propose a two-hit model, where genetic mutations are the first hit. F nucleatum serves as the second hit, accelerating the cancer signaling pathway and speeding tumor growth.”Yiping W. Han, Lead Researchercenter_img The National Center for Biotechnology Information has an RNA-sequencing dataset publicly available, which includes information from 466 patients with primary colon cancer.Researchers studied this dataset and found a positive correlation between higher Annexin A1 expression and poorer prognoses, but made no distinctions between sex, age, or the cancer stage or grade.The researchers are now looking for ways to develop Annexin A1 as a biomarker for more aggressive cancers. They also hope that this research will lead to the development of new treatments for colon cancer, among others, using Annexin A1 as a potential target for the new treatments.last_img read more

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