Calabar, Camperdown clash in crucial game three

first_imgDefending champions Calabar High and Camperdown High square off today in the decisive game of the ISSA Southern Conference Under-19 best-of-three schools basketball final series at the National Indoor Sports Centre. Tip-off time is 6 p.m.Calabar levelled the series last Friday after they initially won Game One, which was ruled null and void after both teams had problems with their identification cards.Camperdown returned to win the replay and the lead in the series, however, the champions tied the series 1-1, and following that win, coach Ludlow Barker believes his charges are now mentally ready for the challenge.”We had a rough week, but we came back, fought hard, and I am really proud of them … Camperdown did a lot of things right the first game and we did a lot of things wrong. They were better, and we had to really dig deep and come up good Game Two,” he said.He anticipates and an even more testing match from the Oneil Brown-coached Camperdown today.”I expect them to come even harder, but we’ll be ready. We’ll be prepared as the players are more mentally ready to get the job done,” he added..Brown is of the view that Calabar’s talisman Maliek McCarthy was the difference in Game Two and he credited the Calabar star for his “composure and decision making under pressure”. However, he said that his team is fired up for today’s match.”I am 100 per cent confident that we are going to take Game Three. We have everything in place and we have something new to the table as we will be bringing in a new player. He has not played all season long and he should make a big difference to the guard position. So we are very confident we are going to take Game Three,” he said.last_img read more

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SA scientist wins US research grant

first_img3 October 2012 The University of Cape Town’s Professor Valerie Mizrahi was one of only 13 science researchers in the world to receive a Senior International Research Scholar (SIRS) award from American non-profit organisation Howard Hughes Medical Institute last week. The opportunity to mentor young scientists falls under the institute’s new initiative, the International Early Career Scientist Programme, which provides funding for a select group of scientists who are in the early stages of their careers and working outside the United States. It was launched earlier this year. “What inspired me is the focus on mentoring early career scientists,” Mizrahi said. “That’s where my passion is and that’s what I want to throw my energy into.” Mizrahi has won numerous other awards through the course of her work, including the 2000 UNESCO-L’Oreal for Women in Science, the 2006 Distinguished Woman Scientist Award from the Science and Technology Department and the Order of the Mapungubwe: Silver for contributions to biochemistry and molecular biology in the country. She was also elected into the Fellowship of the American Academy of Microbiology and given an ‘A’ rating by the National Rearch Foundation in 2009. SAinfo reportercenter_img Mizrahi is the director of the Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine at UCT and is studying the organism that causes human tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The institute looks to understand metabolic flexibility and identify vulnerabilities within the disease in order to discover new drugs to combat the disease.Furthering biomedical research The Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s (HHMI) International Programme supports scientists working in countries outside the United States where further basic biomedical research can be furthered. The SIRS programme is the latest of the institute’s policies to assist scientists around the world and aims to strengthen the global network of biomedical researchers. Each senior research scholar will receive an annual grant of US$100 000 for five years and will get the opportunity to present their research at HHMI, which will facilitate the exchange of new ideas, stimulate research and allow for collaboration. “These senior international research scholars are world leaders in their research areas. They will complement our efforts to support international early career scientists in a positive way,” HHMI’s vice president and chief scientific officer, Jack Dixon, said in a statement.Mentoring the next generation of scientists “Scientific research is a global endeavour, and these grants will provide an opportunity for these highly creative and accomplished scientists to explore new avenues of biomedical research and to mentor promising early career scientists across the world,” said HHMI president, Robert Tjian.last_img read more

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To Improve Wind and Solar Power, Bring Them Together

first_imgBy BEN JERVEYWhat’s keeping solar and wind power from fully taking over the electric grid? For starters, the sun only shines during the day. Wind blows intermittently, is seasonally variable, and is not always blowing when the energy is needed. But what if solar and wind work together?“Wind resource tends to complement solar resource,” says Sarah Kurtz of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory. “Here in Colorado, for instance, the windiest time is during the winter and spring months. In winter, we don’t have as much sunshine, but we tend to get more wind and stronger wind.”A handful of enterprising renewable energy developers are now exploring how solar and wind might better work together, developing hybrid solar–wind projects to take advantage of the power-generating strengths of each — with the two technologies in tandem serving as a better replacement for climate-warming fossil fuels than either could be alone. Ben Jervey is a writer and editor covering climate, energy and the environment. This post originally appeared at the website Ensia. RELATED ARTICLES Tacking on solarOn the rolling plains just west of Australia’s Great Dividing Range, construction is expected to begin on a 10-megawatt solar farm adjacent to 73 wind turbines that are already online. The Australian Renewable Energy Agency — ARENA, a governmental agency tasked with increasing deployment of renewable energy — has invested A$9.9 million in the project, located a few hours southwest of Sydney. Combining solar and wind provides more continuous energy generation than having either technology working alone.But that’s not the only benefit. Co-locating wind and solar plants can save money on grid connections, site development and approvals, says ARENA CEO Ivor Frischknecht. By building the Gullen Solar Farm adjacent to the existing wind project, Frischknecht estimates savings as high as A$6 million — reducing the cost of the project by a full 20%.Frischknecht hopes that the Gullen Range project will serve as a model for how tacking solar onto existing wind farms can boost its application. “Scale isn’t as important for competitiveness when plants are co-located, meaning the approach could also unlock new markets for medium-scale solar PV projects,” he says. And just how big could these new markets be? Frischknecht points to an ARENA-funded study that found an estimated 1,000 MW of solar generating potential at existing wind farms in Australia — enough, ARENA calculates, to power 700,000 homes.“The lessons learned at Gullen Range will be invaluable, as this is the first project of its type in Australia,” Frischknecht says. “It has the potential to cement industry confidence in the approach and provide a blueprint for similar projects to follow.” Renewable Portfolio Standards Produce Big SavingsNew York Utility Finds Big Payoff in New IdeasWhy a Vermont Utility Welcomes Solar A California Utility Looks for New Answers in Solar Integration PuzzleDoes Cheaper Solar Mean We Can Forget Efficiency?Solar Energy Can Make the Grid More Resilient Battery boostersExpanding power production and saving money on installation aren’t the only benefits that can come from combining wind and solar. When applied to microgrid systems — local energy grids that can disconnect from the traditional grid and operate autonomously — combined solar and wind can help cut battery costs as well, says NREL’s Kurtz.According to Kurtz, microgrids are finding application in places like Hawaii and India where utility prices are exorbitantly high or where communities are too remote to be tied into the macrogrid.Microgrids powered by photovoltaics require battery storage, since people need power when the sun isn’t shining. The problem is, batteries are still quite expensive. Adding wind can help cut the battery costs, since the wind can (and often does) blow when the sun doesn’t shine.“If you’re in a location where the wind does blow, and especially where the wind complements solar, until the batteries get cheaper than the wind power itself, you’re going to be better off adding wind [than batteries],” Kurtz says.The microgrid will still need some form of storage, “because there will always be a night when the wind isn’t blowing,” she adds. But the solar and wind combination “can make battery demand much smaller.”As these types of hybrid systems are just now coming online — ARENA hopes that the Gullen Solar Farm will start producing power in July 2017 — there isn’t yet a lot of empirical data about how well they actually perform. But solar developers have been wary that the shadows cast by wind turbines could potentially stunt the production of solar power.Research, however, is allaying some of those fears. Simulations conducted in 2013 by the Reiner Lemoine Institut and Solarpraxis AG, both in Germany, showed that shading losses would be as low as 1% to 2% on average. They also suggested that combining photovoltaics and wind turbines at the same location can actually yield up to twice the amount of electricity as having either system working alone in the same land area. The Gullen Range project, for its part, avoids shading losses altogether by locating the photovoltaics on a northern facing slope beyond the range of any turbines’ shadows. Virtual hybridsIn Texas, the Defense Logistics Agency of the U.S. Department of Defense is getting around any potential downsides of co-locating the two technologies another way — by taking a more “virtual” approach to hybrid wind and solar. The agency is working with developer Apex Clean Energy to meet 100% of Fort Hood’s electricity needs with onsite solar PV panels that are complemented by additional energy wired in from a wind farm in Floyd County, more than 300 miles northwest of the facility.Apex put the solar onsite because the Army wanted the grid security provided by local generation that isn’t vulnerable to power outages and other transmission constraints, Apex director of public affairs Dahvi Wilson explains. But Apex and the Army chose to site the turbines where the wind resource was the strongest. The setup illustrates the point that “[a] hybrid project does not necessary have to be co-located,” Wilson says.Wilson is enthusiastic about how the projects helps make these renewables make sense from an economic as well as environmental standpoint.“Wind energy offers the cheapest option for new energy construction currently available in the U.S., while solar energy can be more expensive to develop and install,” Wilson explains. “By combining the costs into one product, the blended cost is competitive with other new sources of energy.”last_img read more

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Apple in talks with suppliers to build augmented reality glasses

first_imgApple has reportedly been in talks with suppliers to test prototype augmented reality glasses, according to Bloomberg.Citing sources familiar with the matter, the report states that the executive team are “weighing an expansion” into digital glasses.See Also: Apple picks Blackberry talent for driverless car OSThe prototype device connects to an iPhone wirelessly and shows snippets of information from the smartphone in the wearer’s field of vision. We assume it would be similar to Google Glass, but with less clutter on the screen.The firm has not made a decision on the glasses, but CEO Tim Cook has been hinting at an entry into the market in interviews over the past six months.The augmented reality glasses could be an extension of the iPhone experience, similar to how the Apple Watch provides quick access to notifications and more access to fitness details.Google Glass muddied the waters of augmented reality (AR) for a few years, but startups like Magic Leap are making AR sound cool again.The earliest Apple will enter the market is 2018, according to Bloomberg, but there doesn’t seem to be any manufacturer contracts at the present time.Apple not always in a hurryApple often takes a step back and lets the market stew before entering, as they did with the iPhone and Watch. It may be different this time, as most augmented reality projects are still in alpha or beta.That’s assuming they launch in 2018, which has not been confirmed. It may take a few more years before entering they enter the AR space, especially if it gets bogged down in its self-driving car project.Augmented reality has many applicable fields, Magic Leap appears to be aiming for the gaming market, while Microsoft has sent its HoloLens AR headset to NASA for testing on the International Space Station.We expect Apple’s augmented reality headset to target the consumer space, picking on the same customers that are likely to purchase iPhones and iPads. Tags:#Apple#AR#Augmented Reality#Google Glass#Internet of Things#IoT#Magic Leap David Curry Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You…center_img Follow the Puck Related Posts Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to…last_img read more

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